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ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 1 | P a g e
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN
Centre for Modern Architecture Studies in Southeast Asia (MASSA)
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Foundation in Natural and Built Environments
Module : ELEMENT OF NATURAL BUILT ENVIRONMENTS (ARC30105)
Prerequisite : None
Credit Hours : 5
Instructor : Miss Normah Sulaiman (normah.sulaiman@taylors.edu.my)
Ms. Ida Marlina Mazlan (ida.mazlan@gmail.com)
Module Synopsis
This module aims to expose students to the two major components; the natural and built environments. The
emphasis will be based on establishing a symbiotic relationship between the two environments. Students will be
introducing to observational skills, data compilation, report preparation and presentation skills. Their learning
experience and exposure extend the class walls. They will experience nature and the built environment through
site visit which will enhance their understanding of the two component of this subject.
Module Teaching Objectives
The objectives of this module are to encourage the student:
1. To create awareness of the elements of the natural and built environment
2. To expose the elements of the natural and built environment in their basic unit, form and function
3. To show symbiotic relationship of the elements of the natural and built environment
4. To question, analyse and articulate the impact between natural and built environment
Module Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
1. To recognise and identify the different elements of the natural and built environment
2. To describe the different characteristics of the natural and built environment by exploring the basic elements
such as natural topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure.
3. To differentiate and compare the different development of the built environment by looking at the natural
topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure
4. To analyse and evaluate the different development of the built environment by looking at the natural
topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure
5. Understand how to communicate ideas through observation and using different media/tools/techniques to
present information of the study of natural and built environment
Modes of Delivery
This is a 5 credit hour module conducted over a period of 18 weeks. The modes of delivery will be in the form of
lectures, tutorials, and self-directed study. The breakdown of the contact hours for the module is as follows:
 Lecture: 2 hours per week
 Tutorial: 2 hours per week
 Self-directed study: 7 hours per week
Office Hours
You are encouraged to visit the instructor/lecturer/tutor concerned for assistance during office hours. If the office
hours do not meet your schedule, notify the instructor and set appointment times as needed.
ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 2 | P a g e
TIMeS
Moodle will be used as a communication tool and information portal for students to access module materials,
project briefs, assignments and announcements. Lecturer will also use Padlet for communication and
announcements. iTunes U for the module will be created and is available for students using the iPad and iPhone.
Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities (TGC)
The teaching and learning approach at Taylor’s University is focused on developing the Taylor’s Graduate
Capabilities (TGC) in its students; capabilities that encompass the knowledge, cognitive capabilities and soft
skills of its graduates.
Discipline Specific Knowledge
TGCs Acquired
Through Module
Learning Outcomes
1.0 Discipline Specific Knowledge
1.1
Solid foundational knowledge in relevant subjects.
-
1.2
Understand ethical issues in the context of the field of study.
-
Cognitive Capabilities
2.0 Lifelong Learning
2.1
Locate and extract information effectively.
-
2.2
Relate learned knowledge to everyday life.
-
3.0 Thinking and Problem Solving Skills
3.1
Learn to think critically and creatively.
1,2,3,4
3.2
Define and analyse problems to arrive at effective solutions.
1,2,3,4
Soft Skills
4.0 Communication Skills
4.1 Communicate appropriately in various setting and modes. 1,2,3,4
5.0 Interpersonal Skills
5.1 Understand team dynamics and work with others in a team. -
6.0 Intrapersonal Skills
6.1 Manage one self and be self-reliant. -
6.2 Reflect on one’s actions and learning. -
6.3 Embody Taylor's core values. -
7.0 Citizenship and Global Perspectives
7.1 Be aware and form opinions from diverse perspectives. -
ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 3 | P a g e
General Rules and Regulations
Late Submission Penalty
The School imposes a late submission penalty for work submitted late without a valid reason e.g. a medical
certificate. Any work submitted after the deadline (which may have been extended) shall have the percentage
grade assigned to the work on face value reduced by 10% for the first day and 5% for each subsequent day late.
A weekend counts as one (1) day.
Individual members of staff shall be permitted to grant extensions for assessed work that they have set if they
are satisfied that a student has given good reasons.
Absenteeism at intermediate or final presentation will result in zero mark for that presentation.
The Board of Examiners may overrule any penalty imposed and allow the actual mark achieved to be used if the
late submission was for a good reason.
Attendance, Participation and Submission of Assessment Components
Attendance is compulsory. Any student who arrives late after the first half-hour of class will be considered as
absent. The lectures and tutorials will assist you in expanding your ideas and your assessments. A minimum of
80% attendance is required to pass the module and/or be eligible for the final examination and/or presentation.
Students will be assessed based on their performance throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend
and participate actively in class. Class participation is an important component of every module.
Students must attempt all assessment components. Failure to attempt assessment components worth 20% or
more, the student would be required to resubmit or resit an assessment component, even though the student has
achieved more than 50% in the overall assessment. Failure to attempt all assessment components, including
final exam and final presentation, will result in failing the module irrespective of the marks earned, even though
the student has achieved more than 50% in the overall assessment.
Plagiarism (Excerpt from Taylor’s University Student Handbook 2013, page 59)
Plagiarism, which is an attempt to present another person’s work as your own by not acknowledging the source,
is a serious case of misconduct which is deemed unacceptable by the University.
"Work" includes written materials such as books, journals and magazine articles or other papers and also
includes films and computer programs. The two most common types of plagiarism are from published materials
and other students’ works.
1. Published Materials
In general, whenever anything from someone else’s work is used, whether it is an idea, an opinion or the
results of a study or review, a standard system of referencing should be used. Examples of plagiarism may
include a sentence or two, or a table or a diagram from a book or an article used without acknowledgement.
Serious cases of plagiarism can be seen in cases where the entire paper presented by the student is copied
from another book, with an addition of only a sentence or two by the student.
7.2 Understand the value of civic responsibility and community engagement. -
8.0 Digital Literacy
8.1
Effective use of information and communication (ICT) and related
technologies.
1,2,3,4
ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 4 | P a g e
While the former can be treated as a simple failure to cite references, the latter is likely to be viewed as
cheating in an examination.
Though most assignments require the need for reference to other peoples’ works, in order to avoid
plagiarism, students should keep a detailed record of the sources of ideas and findings and ensure that these
sources are clearly quoted in their assignment. Note that plagiarism also refers to materials obtained from the
Internet too.
2. Other Students’ Work
Circulating relevant articles and discussing ideas before writing an assignment is a common practice.
However, with the exception of group assignments, students should write their own papers. Plagiarising the
work of other students into assignments includes using identical or very similar sentences, paragraphs or
sections. When two students submit papers that are very similar in tone and content, both are likely to be
penalised.
Student Participation
Your participation in the module is encouraged. You have the opportunity to participate in the following ways:
 Your ideas and questions are welcomed, valued and encouraged.
 Your input is sought to understand your perspectives, ideas and needs in planning subject revision.
 You have opportunities to give feedback and issues will be addressed in response to that feedback.
 Do reflect on your performance in Portfolios.
 Student evaluation on your views and experiences about the module are actively sought and used as an
integral part of improvement in teaching and continuous improvement.
Student-centered Learning (SCL)
The module uses the Student-centered Learning (SCL) approach. Utilization of SCL embodies most of the
principles known to improve learning and to encourage student’s participation. SCL requires students to be
active, responsible participants in their own learning and instructors are to facilitate the learning process. Various
teaching and learning strategies such as experiential learning, problem-based learning, site visits, group
discussions, presentations, working in group and etc. can be employed to facilitate the learning process. In SCL,
students are expected to be:
 active in their own learning;
 self-directed to be responsible to enhance their learning abilities;
 able to cultivate skills that are useful in today’s workplace;
 active knowledge seekers;
 active players in a team.
Types of Assessment and Feedback
You will be graded in the form of formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments will provide
information to guide you in the research process. This form of assessment involves participation in discussions
and feedback sessions. Summative assessment will inform you about the level of understanding and
performance capabilities achieved at the end of the module.
Assessment Plan
Assessment
Components
Type
Learning
Outcome/s
Submission Presentation
Assessmen
t Weightage
Project One - Nature
Group 15% +
Individual 15%
1,2,3
Week 9 Week 9 30%
Project Two – B.Env
Group 15% +
Individual 25%
1,2,3,4
Week 17 Week 17 40%
ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 5 | P a g e
The Journal Individual
1,2,3,4 Every 3
Weeks
- 20%
E-Portfolio Individual 1,2,3,4 Week 18 - 10%
100%
Assessment Components
1. Project One (NATURAL) – Interactive Infographic Poster + Booklet (Group + Individual)
This is an introduction project is created for the students to explore, experience and appreciate nature.
Through site visit the students will have to represent their findings and information as an Interactive
Infographic Poster and their experience using photos and short clips. This project will not just benefit the
students in this class, but it will spark awareness and inspiration to others around the world once they share it
online via proper media and on their online TGC Portfolio.
2. Project Two (BUILT) – Better City (Group + Individual)
The aim of Project Two is for the students to plan and propose a better city applying the basic knowledge that
has been delivered through lectures and through their investigation. Students will also need to do a report on
an existing city to help them understand the structure of the city as a case study.
3. The Journal – The ENBE Scrap Book (Individual)
The aim of the “The Journal” is as a medium for students to record ideas, information and their further
investigation and references. Students will also be given a topic base on the two main components. Mind
maps, sketches, scribbles, magazine/paper cuts are examples of items that will be placed in the The Journal.
4. Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities Portfolio (Online Portfolio) – (Individual)
Each student is to develop an e-Portfolio, a web-based portfolio in the form of a personal academic blog. The e-
Portfolio is developed progressively for all modules taken throughout Semesters 1 and 2, and MUST PASS THIS
COMPONENT. The portfolio must encapsulate the acquisition of Module Learning Outcome, Programme
Learning Outcomes and Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities, and showcases the distinctiveness and identity of the
student as a graduate of the programme. Submission of the E-Portfolio is COMPULSORY.
ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 6 | P a g e
Marks and Grading Table (Revised as per Programme Guide 2013)
Assessments and grades will be returned within two weeks of your submission. You will be given grades and
necessary feedback for each submission. The grading system is shown below:
Grade Marks
Grade
Points
Definition Description
A 80 – 100 4.00 Excellent
Evidence of original thinking; demonstrated outstanding
capacity to analyze and synthesize; outstanding grasp of
module matter; evidence of extensive knowledge base.
A- 75 – 79 3.67 Very Good
Evidence of good grasp of module matter; critical capacity
and analytical ability; understanding of relevant issues;
evidence of familiarity with the literature.
B+ 70 – 74 3.33
Good
Evidence of grasp of module matter; critical capacity and
analytical ability, reasonable understanding of relevant
issues; evidence of familiarity with the literature.B 65 – 69 3.00
B- 60 – 64 2.67
Pass
Evidence of some understanding of the module matter;
ability to develop solutions to simple problems; benefitting
from his/her university experience.
C+ 55 – 59 2.33
C 50 – 54 2.00
D+ 47 – 49 1.67
Marginal Fail
Evidence of nearly but not quite acceptable familiarity with
module matter, weak in critical and analytical skills.
D 44 – 46 1.33
D- 40 – 43 1.00
F 0 – 39 0.00 Fail
Insufficient evidence of understanding of the module
matter; weakness in critical and analytical skills; limited or
irrelevant use of the literature.
WD - - Withdrawn
Withdrawn from a module before census date, typically
mid-semester.
F(W) 0 0.00 Fail Withdrawn after census date, typically mid-semester.
IN - - Incomplete
An interim notation given for a module where a student
has not completed certain requirements with valid reason
or it is not possible to finalise the grade by the published
deadline.
P - - Pass Given for satisfactory completion of practicum.
AU - - Audit
Given for a module where attendance is for information
only without earning academic credit.

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Enbemoduleoutline 150615071942-lva1-app6891

  • 1. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 1 | P a g e SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN Centre for Modern Architecture Studies in Southeast Asia (MASSA) _________________________________________________________________________________________ Foundation in Natural and Built Environments Module : ELEMENT OF NATURAL BUILT ENVIRONMENTS (ARC30105) Prerequisite : None Credit Hours : 5 Instructor : Miss Normah Sulaiman (normah.sulaiman@taylors.edu.my) Ms. Ida Marlina Mazlan (ida.mazlan@gmail.com) Module Synopsis This module aims to expose students to the two major components; the natural and built environments. The emphasis will be based on establishing a symbiotic relationship between the two environments. Students will be introducing to observational skills, data compilation, report preparation and presentation skills. Their learning experience and exposure extend the class walls. They will experience nature and the built environment through site visit which will enhance their understanding of the two component of this subject. Module Teaching Objectives The objectives of this module are to encourage the student: 1. To create awareness of the elements of the natural and built environment 2. To expose the elements of the natural and built environment in their basic unit, form and function 3. To show symbiotic relationship of the elements of the natural and built environment 4. To question, analyse and articulate the impact between natural and built environment Module Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to: 1. To recognise and identify the different elements of the natural and built environment 2. To describe the different characteristics of the natural and built environment by exploring the basic elements such as natural topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure. 3. To differentiate and compare the different development of the built environment by looking at the natural topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure 4. To analyse and evaluate the different development of the built environment by looking at the natural topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure 5. Understand how to communicate ideas through observation and using different media/tools/techniques to present information of the study of natural and built environment Modes of Delivery This is a 5 credit hour module conducted over a period of 18 weeks. The modes of delivery will be in the form of lectures, tutorials, and self-directed study. The breakdown of the contact hours for the module is as follows:  Lecture: 2 hours per week  Tutorial: 2 hours per week  Self-directed study: 7 hours per week Office Hours You are encouraged to visit the instructor/lecturer/tutor concerned for assistance during office hours. If the office hours do not meet your schedule, notify the instructor and set appointment times as needed.
  • 2. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 2 | P a g e TIMeS Moodle will be used as a communication tool and information portal for students to access module materials, project briefs, assignments and announcements. Lecturer will also use Padlet for communication and announcements. iTunes U for the module will be created and is available for students using the iPad and iPhone. Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities (TGC) The teaching and learning approach at Taylor’s University is focused on developing the Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities (TGC) in its students; capabilities that encompass the knowledge, cognitive capabilities and soft skills of its graduates. Discipline Specific Knowledge TGCs Acquired Through Module Learning Outcomes 1.0 Discipline Specific Knowledge 1.1 Solid foundational knowledge in relevant subjects. - 1.2 Understand ethical issues in the context of the field of study. - Cognitive Capabilities 2.0 Lifelong Learning 2.1 Locate and extract information effectively. - 2.2 Relate learned knowledge to everyday life. - 3.0 Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 3.1 Learn to think critically and creatively. 1,2,3,4 3.2 Define and analyse problems to arrive at effective solutions. 1,2,3,4 Soft Skills 4.0 Communication Skills 4.1 Communicate appropriately in various setting and modes. 1,2,3,4 5.0 Interpersonal Skills 5.1 Understand team dynamics and work with others in a team. - 6.0 Intrapersonal Skills 6.1 Manage one self and be self-reliant. - 6.2 Reflect on one’s actions and learning. - 6.3 Embody Taylor's core values. - 7.0 Citizenship and Global Perspectives 7.1 Be aware and form opinions from diverse perspectives. -
  • 3. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 3 | P a g e General Rules and Regulations Late Submission Penalty The School imposes a late submission penalty for work submitted late without a valid reason e.g. a medical certificate. Any work submitted after the deadline (which may have been extended) shall have the percentage grade assigned to the work on face value reduced by 10% for the first day and 5% for each subsequent day late. A weekend counts as one (1) day. Individual members of staff shall be permitted to grant extensions for assessed work that they have set if they are satisfied that a student has given good reasons. Absenteeism at intermediate or final presentation will result in zero mark for that presentation. The Board of Examiners may overrule any penalty imposed and allow the actual mark achieved to be used if the late submission was for a good reason. Attendance, Participation and Submission of Assessment Components Attendance is compulsory. Any student who arrives late after the first half-hour of class will be considered as absent. The lectures and tutorials will assist you in expanding your ideas and your assessments. A minimum of 80% attendance is required to pass the module and/or be eligible for the final examination and/or presentation. Students will be assessed based on their performance throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend and participate actively in class. Class participation is an important component of every module. Students must attempt all assessment components. Failure to attempt assessment components worth 20% or more, the student would be required to resubmit or resit an assessment component, even though the student has achieved more than 50% in the overall assessment. Failure to attempt all assessment components, including final exam and final presentation, will result in failing the module irrespective of the marks earned, even though the student has achieved more than 50% in the overall assessment. Plagiarism (Excerpt from Taylor’s University Student Handbook 2013, page 59) Plagiarism, which is an attempt to present another person’s work as your own by not acknowledging the source, is a serious case of misconduct which is deemed unacceptable by the University. "Work" includes written materials such as books, journals and magazine articles or other papers and also includes films and computer programs. The two most common types of plagiarism are from published materials and other students’ works. 1. Published Materials In general, whenever anything from someone else’s work is used, whether it is an idea, an opinion or the results of a study or review, a standard system of referencing should be used. Examples of plagiarism may include a sentence or two, or a table or a diagram from a book or an article used without acknowledgement. Serious cases of plagiarism can be seen in cases where the entire paper presented by the student is copied from another book, with an addition of only a sentence or two by the student. 7.2 Understand the value of civic responsibility and community engagement. - 8.0 Digital Literacy 8.1 Effective use of information and communication (ICT) and related technologies. 1,2,3,4
  • 4. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 4 | P a g e While the former can be treated as a simple failure to cite references, the latter is likely to be viewed as cheating in an examination. Though most assignments require the need for reference to other peoples’ works, in order to avoid plagiarism, students should keep a detailed record of the sources of ideas and findings and ensure that these sources are clearly quoted in their assignment. Note that plagiarism also refers to materials obtained from the Internet too. 2. Other Students’ Work Circulating relevant articles and discussing ideas before writing an assignment is a common practice. However, with the exception of group assignments, students should write their own papers. Plagiarising the work of other students into assignments includes using identical or very similar sentences, paragraphs or sections. When two students submit papers that are very similar in tone and content, both are likely to be penalised. Student Participation Your participation in the module is encouraged. You have the opportunity to participate in the following ways:  Your ideas and questions are welcomed, valued and encouraged.  Your input is sought to understand your perspectives, ideas and needs in planning subject revision.  You have opportunities to give feedback and issues will be addressed in response to that feedback.  Do reflect on your performance in Portfolios.  Student evaluation on your views and experiences about the module are actively sought and used as an integral part of improvement in teaching and continuous improvement. Student-centered Learning (SCL) The module uses the Student-centered Learning (SCL) approach. Utilization of SCL embodies most of the principles known to improve learning and to encourage student’s participation. SCL requires students to be active, responsible participants in their own learning and instructors are to facilitate the learning process. Various teaching and learning strategies such as experiential learning, problem-based learning, site visits, group discussions, presentations, working in group and etc. can be employed to facilitate the learning process. In SCL, students are expected to be:  active in their own learning;  self-directed to be responsible to enhance their learning abilities;  able to cultivate skills that are useful in today’s workplace;  active knowledge seekers;  active players in a team. Types of Assessment and Feedback You will be graded in the form of formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments will provide information to guide you in the research process. This form of assessment involves participation in discussions and feedback sessions. Summative assessment will inform you about the level of understanding and performance capabilities achieved at the end of the module. Assessment Plan Assessment Components Type Learning Outcome/s Submission Presentation Assessmen t Weightage Project One - Nature Group 15% + Individual 15% 1,2,3 Week 9 Week 9 30% Project Two – B.Env Group 15% + Individual 25% 1,2,3,4 Week 17 Week 17 40%
  • 5. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 5 | P a g e The Journal Individual 1,2,3,4 Every 3 Weeks - 20% E-Portfolio Individual 1,2,3,4 Week 18 - 10% 100% Assessment Components 1. Project One (NATURAL) – Interactive Infographic Poster + Booklet (Group + Individual) This is an introduction project is created for the students to explore, experience and appreciate nature. Through site visit the students will have to represent their findings and information as an Interactive Infographic Poster and their experience using photos and short clips. This project will not just benefit the students in this class, but it will spark awareness and inspiration to others around the world once they share it online via proper media and on their online TGC Portfolio. 2. Project Two (BUILT) – Better City (Group + Individual) The aim of Project Two is for the students to plan and propose a better city applying the basic knowledge that has been delivered through lectures and through their investigation. Students will also need to do a report on an existing city to help them understand the structure of the city as a case study. 3. The Journal – The ENBE Scrap Book (Individual) The aim of the “The Journal” is as a medium for students to record ideas, information and their further investigation and references. Students will also be given a topic base on the two main components. Mind maps, sketches, scribbles, magazine/paper cuts are examples of items that will be placed in the The Journal. 4. Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities Portfolio (Online Portfolio) – (Individual) Each student is to develop an e-Portfolio, a web-based portfolio in the form of a personal academic blog. The e- Portfolio is developed progressively for all modules taken throughout Semesters 1 and 2, and MUST PASS THIS COMPONENT. The portfolio must encapsulate the acquisition of Module Learning Outcome, Programme Learning Outcomes and Taylor’s Graduate Capabilities, and showcases the distinctiveness and identity of the student as a graduate of the programme. Submission of the E-Portfolio is COMPULSORY.
  • 6. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 6 | P a g e Marks and Grading Table (Revised as per Programme Guide 2013) Assessments and grades will be returned within two weeks of your submission. You will be given grades and necessary feedback for each submission. The grading system is shown below: Grade Marks Grade Points Definition Description A 80 – 100 4.00 Excellent Evidence of original thinking; demonstrated outstanding capacity to analyze and synthesize; outstanding grasp of module matter; evidence of extensive knowledge base. A- 75 – 79 3.67 Very Good Evidence of good grasp of module matter; critical capacity and analytical ability; understanding of relevant issues; evidence of familiarity with the literature. B+ 70 – 74 3.33 Good Evidence of grasp of module matter; critical capacity and analytical ability, reasonable understanding of relevant issues; evidence of familiarity with the literature.B 65 – 69 3.00 B- 60 – 64 2.67 Pass Evidence of some understanding of the module matter; ability to develop solutions to simple problems; benefitting from his/her university experience. C+ 55 – 59 2.33 C 50 – 54 2.00 D+ 47 – 49 1.67 Marginal Fail Evidence of nearly but not quite acceptable familiarity with module matter, weak in critical and analytical skills. D 44 – 46 1.33 D- 40 – 43 1.00 F 0 – 39 0.00 Fail Insufficient evidence of understanding of the module matter; weakness in critical and analytical skills; limited or irrelevant use of the literature. WD - - Withdrawn Withdrawn from a module before census date, typically mid-semester. F(W) 0 0.00 Fail Withdrawn after census date, typically mid-semester. IN - - Incomplete An interim notation given for a module where a student has not completed certain requirements with valid reason or it is not possible to finalise the grade by the published deadline. P - - Pass Given for satisfactory completion of practicum. AU - - Audit Given for a module where attendance is for information only without earning academic credit.
  • 7. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 7 | P a g e Module Schedule Date Topic Lecture Hours Tutorial Hours Blended Learning W1 23rd-27th March *Orientation Week (No lecture and tutorial session) 2 2 2 Digital upload of Project 21 W2 1st April Introduction ENBE Module W2 8th April Lecture 01: What is the Natural Environment by Miss Normah Sulaiman Project One Brief 2 2 2 W3 15th April Site Visit : Kuala Lumpur Bird Park, Orchid Park and KL Lake Garden. W4 22nd April Lecture 02: Habitat + Ecosystem by Ms. Ida Mazlan 2 2 2 W5 29th April Lecture 03: Natural Resources & Awareness & Conserving Nature by Miss Normah Sulaiman 2 2 2 W6 6th May Progress Presentation 01 : Project One Group Component The Journal Part 1 : Briefing by Miss Normah Sulaiman 2 2 2 W7 13th May Lecture 04: Design Landscapes A relationship between design intervention and natural environment by Miss Normah Sulaiman 2 2 2 Digital upload of TJ01 Semester Break W8 27th May Presentation Day – Project One Group Component 2 2 2 Digital upload of P.1 W9 3rd June Lecture 05: What is the Built Environment? Shelter for inhabitation by Miss Normah Sulaiman Lecture 06: Built Environment – Space and Types of Building by Miss Normah Sulaiman Project Two – Briefing The Journal Part 2 : Briefing by Miss Normah Sulaiman 2 2 2 Digital upload of TJ02 W10 10th June Site Visit – Kuala Lumpur 2 2 2 W11 17th June Lecture 08: Built Environment – Rural and Suburban Context by Ms. Ida Mazlan Lecture 11: Built Environment – Urban Context by Miss Normah Sulaiman 2 2 2
  • 8. ENBE (FNBE 0115) April 2015 8 | P a g e W12 24th June Discussion / Class Activities Related to Final Project 2 2 2 W13 1st July Discussion / Class Activities Related to Final Project 2 2 2 W15 8th July Progress Presentation 01 : Project Two All Component 2 2 2 W16 15th July Discussion / Class Activities Related to E-Portfolio 2 2 2 Hari Raya Break W17 29th July Presentation and Submission of Project Two W18 5th August TGC Portfolio Submission - - 6 W19 EXAM WEEK Final Exam Week (NO EXAM FOR ENBE) Note: The Module Schedule above is subject to change at short notice. References Primary: 1. Ching, Francis D.K., 2002. Architecture: Form, Space and Order, Van Nostrand Reinhold. 2. Ching, Francis D.K., 2000. Drawing: A Creative Process, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, New York. 3. Long, Richard, 1991. Walking in Circles, George Braziller. 4. T.C. Whitmore, 1998. An Introduction to Tropical Rain Forests, Oxford University Press, USA Secondary: 1. Baker, Geoffrey H., 1996. Le Corbusier – An Analysis of Form, Van Nostrand Reihold, 1996. 2. de Sausmarez, F, 1983. Basic Design: the Dynamics of Visual Form, Rev. ed., London, Herbert. 3. Lawson, Bryan, “How Designer Think: The Process Demystified”, Bryan Lawson, Architectural Press, London 1980. 4. Unwin, Simon, “ Analysing Architecture”, Routledge, 1997 5. Lawson, Bryan, “Designing Mind”, Butterworth, Oxford, 1994. 6. Khoolhaas, Rem, 1998. “S,M,L,XL”, Monacelli Press