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Katie Curo - Activities Aren't Relationships

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Presentation by Katie Curo of Befriend Inc. - Activities Aren't Relationships: Supporting relationship outcomes using social identity approaches. Presented at the Western Australian Mental Health Conference 2019.

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Katie Curo - Activities Aren't Relationships

  1. 1. AC TIVITIES A R E N’ T R E L ATIO N SHIP S Katie Curo Relationships & Inclusion Consultant Befriend Inc. SUPPORTING RELATIONSHIP OUTCOMES USING SOCIAL IDENTITY APPROACHES
  2. 2. Overview ■ Evidence supporting the use of social interventions to improve physical & mental health ■ The Social Identity Approach to Health (Groups 4 Health) ■ Social Network Mapping (GENIE) ■ How Befriend have adapted these approaches ■ Case study
  3. 3. Image source: https://www.avivo.org.au
  4. 4. What do we believe is good for our health? We are bombarded with information about what keeps us healthy. Rank the factors that you think are most important for staying healthy. ■ Taking appropriate medication ■ Being socially integrated ■ Not drinking too much alcohol ■ Receiving a lot of social support ■ Avoiding air pollution ■ Flu vaccination ■ Not smoking ■ Quitting Smoking ■ Not being obese ■ Doing exercise ■ Being physically active Haslam, C., et al. (2016). GROUPS 4 HEALTH Workbook (version 3.0). Social Identity and Groups Network (SIGN), University of Queensland, Australia.
  5. 5. Haslam, C., et al. (2016). GROUPS 4 HEALTH Workbook (version 3.0). Social Identity and Groups Network (SIGN), University of Queensland, Australia.
  6. 6. Supporting individuals to improve their health
  7. 7. THE OPTIONS AVAILABL E DON’T TYPICALL Y ADDRESS SOCIAL HEALTH
  8. 8. Yet, the evidence supporting the link between social & physical and mental health is growing. S o c i o l o g y P s y c h o l o g y A n t h r o p o l o g y M e d i c i n eJ o u r n a l i s m
  9. 9. Typical responses to social isolation Q: So what are some more effective approaches for supporting people to improve their social health? Response Problem 1. We do loads of activities Activities ≠ Relationships 2. We fill all of a person’s social needs ourselves Burnout, feelings of abandonment
  10. 10. The Social Identity Approach to Health ■ Evidence-based interventions that emphasise activities that develop, maintain, or bolster the social identities of service users ■ Social Identity Groups Network (www.socialidentitynetwork.com) and University of Queensland
  11. 11. Social Identity ■ Henri Tajfel (1972) ■ Internalised group membership that serves to define a person’s sense of who they are in a given social context ■ Different to the notion of personal identity ■ Can contribute to both good and bad health outcomes
  12. 12. Groups 4 Health Intervention ■ “How can we furnish people with the skills to use social groups as a beneficial psychological resource in their daily lives?” ■ 5 Modules: – Schooling – Scoping – Sourcing – Scaffolding – Sustaining ■ www.groups4health.com
  13. 13. Image source: https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-31/may-2018/scaffolding-stronger-society
  14. 14. Groups 4 Health Intervention ■ “How can we furnish people with the skills to use social groups as a beneficial psychological resource in their daily lives?” ■ 5 Modules: – Schooling – Scoping – Sourcing – Scaffolding – Sustaining ■ www.groups4health.com
  15. 15. Social Network Analysis ■ Use in data-science ■ Roots in Anthropology ■ Mapping and reflecting on the composition of personal networks, eliciting preferences, and considering options for engaging with local and online resources, groups, people and organizations (Kennedy, Vassilev et al. 2016). ■ www.genie.soton.ac.uk Kennedy, A., et al. (2016). "Implementing a social network intervention designed to enhance and diversify support for people with long-term conditions. A qualitative study." Implementation science : IS 11(1): 27.
  16. 16. Social Network Mapping ■ Benefits for the individual ■ Benefits for the Community Mental Health Professional ■ Benefits for the organisation ■ Benefits for the individual ■ Benefits for the Community Mental Health Professional ■ Benefits for the organisation
  17. 17. Who is the person? (Identity Mapping) ■ What are they interested in? ■ What do they care about? ■ Where are their passions/interests not reflected socially? ■ What are the opportunities to support them to enhance their social identities?
  18. 18. Social identity development work ■ Who can they be? ■ What can they do to learn more? ■ Can occur 1:1 or in group contexts ■ Important to have rhythm
  19. 19. Social Network Mapping ■ Outcomes: – Changes to quantity of relationships – Changes to quality of relationships
  20. 20. Meet Sarah… Social Network Mapping (pre) Who is this person? Social Network Mapping (post) Sarah’s end goal - friendship
  21. 21. Concluding questions ■ What frameworks do we currently use when supporting people to improve the quantity and quality of their social relationships? ■ How might the concept of social identity strengthen the way we support social outcomes? ■ What are the risks of waiting until a person has their ducks in a row before addressing social outcomes? ■ How might we furnish people with the skills to use social groups as a resource to enhance their social identity? ■ How might we embed social approaches within our current models of service delivery?
  22. 22. Contact details / T h e B e f rie nd S o c ial N e two rk ka t ie@befrie nd. org .a u / B e f rie ndI n c / B e f rie ndinc r s v p@be friend. o rg. au ( 0 8 ) 9 5 2 0 8 574 w w w. b e frie nd. org . au 0 4 3 4 5 5 9 564

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