Roots of cst tradition

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Roots of cst tradition

  1. 1. Roots ofCatholic Social Teaching from Tradition
  2. 2. Essential Question Why would a Church that is responsible for the “souls” of millions enter the world of economic uncertainty and political strife?
  3. 3. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Review: Three Sources of C.S.T. are . . . ?  Old and New Testaments  History / Tradition of the Church  Life and Social Sciences
  4. 4. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Review Old Testament Roots of C.S.T.  Laws –for benefit of the poor with special emphasis on widows, orphans, and aliens  Prophets – challenged corruption of political and religious leadership and challenged the overall community to a higher moral standard. Review New Testament Roots of C.S.T.  Gospels – examples and teachings of Jesus  Acts of the Apostles– the early Christian Community’s “communism”  Letters – Paul, Peter, James, John, Jude
  5. 5. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition From c. 100 – 1891 A.D.  There was no body of Catholic teaching that would be labeled Social Justice.  “Care for the poor” and “Do unto others” was about as far as it went.  During these centuries religious communities took responsibility for  Building hospitals and caring for the sick  Founding schools and educating the people  Helping immigrants find their way in a new home  Feeding the hungry  Caring for those displaced by war, famine, etc.
  6. 6. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Prior to the 20th Century  It was not common for governments to create and fund programs that were designed to help the poor.  At times, good monarchs may have worked to keep their poor subjects happy, but probably more out of a fear of rebellion than a sense justice.  The role of working for charity and justice was filled by individuals and religious communities and organizations (Catholic & Non-Catholic).
  7. 7. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Two Events of the Late Nineteenth Century forced the Church to Deal with Social Justice in a way it never had to in the past:1. The Industrial Revolution 2. The Rise of Marxist-Communism
  8. 8. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition The Industrial Revolution  Prior to Industrial Revolution, the world was mostly an agrarian / rural based economy.  Industrial Revolution created a manufacturing / urban based economy, with new problems:  Tension existed between capital (managers or owners) and labor (the workers) over better wages and safer working conditions.  Capital: willing to exploit the worker for profit;  Labor: willingness to commit acts of violence for better wages & working conditions.
  9. 9. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition The Rise of Marxist Communism  Given the exploitation of industrial workers, Marxist Communism became an attractive philosophy to workers:  “Workers of the World Unite!” – Workers wanted to join unions, which had communist sympathies.  M.C. saw religion as “opium for the people” – they questioned the notion of enduring suffering with the hope that heaven’s reward will be great.
  10. 10. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition The Catholic Church now had ideological competition which it hadn’t had in the past. These events came to a head in 1891, when Pope Leo XIII wrote an encyclical (a letter) addressing “these new things”.  Rerum Novarum  “Of These New Things”  “On the Condition of Labor”
  11. 11. Rerum Novarum (Translation: Of New Things) Rerum Novarum (Translation: Of New Things)  encyclical issued by Pope Leo XIII on May 15, 1891  an open letter that addressed the condition of the working classes  encyclical is [commonly] entitled, "On the Condition of Labor". It discusses the relationships and mutual duties between labor and capital, as well as government and its citizens.  Of primary concern was the need for some [relief] for "the misery and wretchedness pressing so unjustly on the majority of the working class.” It supports the rights of labor to form unions, rejected communism and unrestricted capitalism, while affirming the right to private property.  (Read : Message, Impact & Class vs. Class)
  12. 12. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Rerum Novarum was the first social justice encyclical defining the Church’s position on a social issue: the relationship between capital and labor. Statements to:  Workers  Employers  Governments
  13. 13. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition  Rerum Novarum to Workers:  you have the right to join unions and strike, but you may not commit acts of violence against your employers.  (Read: On Rights and Responsibilities of Workers)
  14. 14. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition  Rerum Novarum to Employers:  you are serving society by providing jobs and necessary goods, but you need to pay your workers a just wage.  (Read: On Rights and Responsibilities of Employers)
  15. 15. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Rerum Novarum to Governments:  you need to pass laws and build institutions that protect workers and promote the common good.  (Read: On the Rights and Responsibilities of Government)
  16. 16. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Many of the positions in Rerum Novarum were supplemented by later encyclicals, in particular Pius XI’s Quadragesimo Anno / On the Fortieth Anniversary of “Rerum Novarum” (1931); John XXIII’s Mater et Magistra / Mother and Church (1961); and John Paul II’s Centesimus Annus / On the One Hundredth Anniversary of “Rerum Novarum (1991). Vatican Council II Benedict XVI John Paul II Leo XIII John XXIII
  17. 17. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition Other C.S.T. documents written in the 20 th Century were also written in response to what the Church perceives as injustice:  Work  Economics  War  Environment  Life issues
  18. 18. Roots of C.S.T. from Tradition The “nine + two” themes of C.S.T. are themes that are taken from these documents and organized. There’s no official list  Some sources group them as 7 themes  Other sources as 12 themes
  19. 19. Essential Question Why would a Church that is responsible for the “souls” of millions enter the world of economic uncertainty and political strife?

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