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The Innovator #5

5th Issue of The Innovator, Les Echos' anglophone publication on technology, innovation and digital transformation.

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SUPPLÉMENT GRATUIT AU #22643 DU QUOTIDIEN
”LES ÉCHOS” DU 26 FÉVRIER 2018
NE PEUT ÊTRE VENDU SÉPARÉMENT
#5 – February 2018 - Mobile World Congress/4YFN
Distributed in Barcelona and in Les Echos # 22643
CHINA RACES AHEAD
WHY HIGH-SPEED
WIRELESS IS
A HIGH-PRIORITY
NATIONAL STRATEGY
PUTTING AR/VR TO WORK
BUSINESSES
ARE PROVING TO BE
FAST ADOPTERS
A $1 TRILLION TELECOMS
OPPORTUNITY?
Q&A WITH MOBILE WORLD
CONGRESS SPEAKER
BRIAN BEHLENDORF
HOW5G
WILLIMPACT
COUNTRIES
CITIES
AND
COMPANIES
The Innovator #5
Anything is possible
when people work together.
Workplace by Facebook connects people in organisations so they can work smarter, better and faster together.
Not only does it integrate with popular business tools, it uses features that are known and loved by two billion
people around the world.
Share the company news that matters
Keep connected to your team and organisation with your personalised News Feed.
Have important conversations your way
Break the email chain with Workplace Chat for crystal clear voice or HD video calls.
Put your heads together
Create a project Group for effortless teamwork and enjoy secure file sharing with unlimited storage.
Take control of your data
At Workplace we take security seriously and we’re proud to be ISO 27001 certified.
More than just another tool
Make Workplace the heart of your organisation with direct access to files and information
in the business tools you already use.
Businesses like yours are already benefitting from Workplace transformation
When multinational cheese maker Groupe Bel wanted to transform its culture and encourage collaboration,
it turned to Workplace. Groups, Workplace Chat and News Feed all help the company’s workforce share ideas
and stay connected to each other.
• 91% of people at Groupe Bel collaborate on Workplace
• 68% say Workplace helps them be better informed
“We have chosen Workplace to accompany our transformation towards a more digital future. It shows
how much collaboration and innovation are key for us. And it really contributes to make the difference.”
Antoine Fiévet,
CEO, Groupe Bel
You’re in good company
Join over 30,000 organisations already using Workplace to transform their business and embrace
the future of work.
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
EuropeshouldtreatChina’s5Gambitionsasawake-upcall.The
country is determined to gain dominance not just in high-speed wireless technology
but in the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence. Dominance in all three of these
key technologies would potentially make China a tech powerhouse and benefit its in-
dustries over those in other countries.
It will be tough for Europe to compete. But it is not impossible. In the 1980s the French
and Italian governments took a step back and decided that computer chips were crucial
to everything and resolved to merge their respective national semiconductor compa-
nies. Many scoffed at the merger of Italy’s SGSMicroelettronica and France’s Thomson-
CSF’s semiconductor operations. Neither company had succeeded in imposing itself on
the global semiconductor market, by then dominated by the United States and Japan.
SGSMicroelettronica, although profitable, was crippled by a heavydebt load, while the
Thomson-CSF business had long been losing money. Neither companyhad been able to
keep pace with the rapid technological developments of the era, as semiconductor ma-
nufacturers began investing heavily in new random-access memory chip technologies.
Yet both companies were strongly backed by their respective governments, which were
eager to maintain their own – and Europe’s – presence among the world’s semiconduc-
tor industry. Merging the two, in 1987, created a global chip company, which –thanks
to smart investments and good management — rose to as high as the number three po-
sitionamongtheglobaltop10chipmakers.(ThomsonsoldoffitssharesinSGSThomson
in 1998, and the company then changed its name to STMicroelectronics).
If AI is, as Google’s CEO says, more important than the invention of fire and electricity
and 5G is truly a general-purpose technology that will bring about changes as sweeping
asthosebroughtbytheinventionofthesteamengineortheInternet,thensimilarmeasures
arenecessary.By20355Gispoisedtocreate22millionnewjobsglobally,generate$3.5
trillion in economic activity and fuel sustainable long-term growth to global real GDP. It
willunderpinthedevelopmentoftheIndustrialInternetofThingsandartificialintelligence,
two technologies that will be crucial for economic development. It is time for countries
and companies to once again step up. Europe can’t afford to miss out.
ByJenniferL.Schenker
Editor-in-Chief,TheInnovator
CLOSINGTHEDIGITAL
SKILLSGAP
THEBRIEF
COVERSTORY
5G’SIMPACTONCOUNTRIES,
CITIESANDCOMPANIES
WHYCHINAWANTSTOLEAD
THE5GCHARGE
WHYTHEU.S.ANDEUROPE
NEEDTOWININWIRELESS
BARCELONA’SBIDTOBECOME
AGLOBAL5GHUB
TELEFÓNICAISUSING
MOONSHOTSTOREINVENTITSELF
HOWBLOCKCHAIN
COULDTRANSFORM
THETELECOMINDUSTRY
ANDMORE
THE25STARTUPSTOMEET
AT4YFN
CYBERCRIMEISGOINGMOBILE
NEWWAYSOFCOLLABORATING
INTHEWORKPLACE
PUTTINGAR/VRTOWORK
WHYGRAPHENESHOULDBE
ONEVERYEXECUTIVE’SRADAR
HOWUNILEVERFOUNDRY
ALLOWSSTARTUPSTOCONNECT
TOITS400BRANDS
5GANDNEWREGULATIONS
AREEXPECTED
TOHELPDRONESTAKEOFF
P.05
P.06
P.08
P.11
P.14
P.16
P.20
P.22
P.24
P.26
P.30
P.32
P.34
P.38
P.40
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
— P.03
THE IOTA FOUNDATION
IOTA is overseen by the IOTA Foun-
dation, a non-profit organisation
dedicated to building sustainable
ecosystems around IOTA, develo-
ping the DLT technology for real
life applications and maintaining
it license-free for all developers to
work with. The Foundation gathers
a team of world leading experts in
the respective fields and sets up de-
dicated working groups with com-
panies and research institutions in
those sectors to share know-how,
initiate experimentation and proac-
tively engage the startup communi-
ty, innovators and developers.
THE BACKBONE OF THE IOT
IOTA is a revolutionary new transac-
tional settlement and data transfer
layer for the Internet of Things. It’s
based on a new distributed ledger,
the Tangle, which overcomes the
inefficiencies of current Blockchain
designs.
IOTA is also the missing puzzle pie-
ce for the Machine Economy to fully
emerge and reach its desired poten-
tial. It is envisioned to be the pub-
lic, permissionless backbone for the
Internet of Things,that enables true
interoperability between all devices.
ZERO FEES - INFINITELY SCALABLE
Unlike blockchains, which are inhe-
rently limited by the bottleneck of
block size and rigid chain, which
leads to congestion and high fees
when usage goes up, IOTA’s Tangle
gets more efficient the more activity
occurs on the ledger. Perhaps more
importantly, because the Tangle eli-
minates the requirement of miners
and stakers, newly mined units of
currency and transaction fees do
not need to be extracted from the
system to pay validation fees. The
result is that IOTA has zero fees.
DATA INTEGRITY
IOTA’s main features (in its current
form) are feeless micropayments,
secure data transfer and data an-
choring. Combined with IOTA’s sca-
lability and partition tolerance, the-
se two features allow a plethora of
use cases to be derived which are
only possible with IOTA.
The main focus of IOTA is the Inter-
net of Things, with machines pay-
ing each other autonomously for
resources, services and/or access.
INTRODUCING IOTAINTRODUCING IOTA
Tangle
Txs
NetworkCapacity
Blockchain
www.iota.org / info@iota.org

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The Innovator #5

  • 1. SUPPLÉMENT GRATUIT AU #22643 DU QUOTIDIEN ”LES ÉCHOS” DU 26 FÉVRIER 2018 NE PEUT ÊTRE VENDU SÉPARÉMENT #5 – February 2018 - Mobile World Congress/4YFN Distributed in Barcelona and in Les Echos # 22643 CHINA RACES AHEAD WHY HIGH-SPEED WIRELESS IS A HIGH-PRIORITY NATIONAL STRATEGY PUTTING AR/VR TO WORK BUSINESSES ARE PROVING TO BE FAST ADOPTERS A $1 TRILLION TELECOMS OPPORTUNITY? Q&A WITH MOBILE WORLD CONGRESS SPEAKER BRIAN BEHLENDORF HOW5G WILLIMPACT COUNTRIES CITIES AND COMPANIES
  • 3. Anything is possible when people work together. Workplace by Facebook connects people in organisations so they can work smarter, better and faster together. Not only does it integrate with popular business tools, it uses features that are known and loved by two billion people around the world. Share the company news that matters Keep connected to your team and organisation with your personalised News Feed. Have important conversations your way Break the email chain with Workplace Chat for crystal clear voice or HD video calls. Put your heads together Create a project Group for effortless teamwork and enjoy secure file sharing with unlimited storage. Take control of your data At Workplace we take security seriously and we’re proud to be ISO 27001 certified. More than just another tool Make Workplace the heart of your organisation with direct access to files and information in the business tools you already use.
  • 4. Businesses like yours are already benefitting from Workplace transformation When multinational cheese maker Groupe Bel wanted to transform its culture and encourage collaboration, it turned to Workplace. Groups, Workplace Chat and News Feed all help the company’s workforce share ideas and stay connected to each other. • 91% of people at Groupe Bel collaborate on Workplace • 68% say Workplace helps them be better informed “We have chosen Workplace to accompany our transformation towards a more digital future. It shows how much collaboration and innovation are key for us. And it really contributes to make the difference.” Antoine Fiévet, CEO, Groupe Bel You’re in good company Join over 30,000 organisations already using Workplace to transform their business and embrace the future of work.
  • 5. LETTER FROM THE EDITOR EuropeshouldtreatChina’s5Gambitionsasawake-upcall.The country is determined to gain dominance not just in high-speed wireless technology but in the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence. Dominance in all three of these key technologies would potentially make China a tech powerhouse and benefit its in- dustries over those in other countries. It will be tough for Europe to compete. But it is not impossible. In the 1980s the French and Italian governments took a step back and decided that computer chips were crucial to everything and resolved to merge their respective national semiconductor compa- nies. Many scoffed at the merger of Italy’s SGSMicroelettronica and France’s Thomson- CSF’s semiconductor operations. Neither company had succeeded in imposing itself on the global semiconductor market, by then dominated by the United States and Japan. SGSMicroelettronica, although profitable, was crippled by a heavydebt load, while the Thomson-CSF business had long been losing money. Neither companyhad been able to keep pace with the rapid technological developments of the era, as semiconductor ma- nufacturers began investing heavily in new random-access memory chip technologies. Yet both companies were strongly backed by their respective governments, which were eager to maintain their own – and Europe’s – presence among the world’s semiconduc- tor industry. Merging the two, in 1987, created a global chip company, which –thanks to smart investments and good management — rose to as high as the number three po- sitionamongtheglobaltop10chipmakers.(ThomsonsoldoffitssharesinSGSThomson in 1998, and the company then changed its name to STMicroelectronics). If AI is, as Google’s CEO says, more important than the invention of fire and electricity and 5G is truly a general-purpose technology that will bring about changes as sweeping asthosebroughtbytheinventionofthesteamengineortheInternet,thensimilarmeasures arenecessary.By20355Gispoisedtocreate22millionnewjobsglobally,generate$3.5 trillion in economic activity and fuel sustainable long-term growth to global real GDP. It willunderpinthedevelopmentoftheIndustrialInternetofThingsandartificialintelligence, two technologies that will be crucial for economic development. It is time for countries and companies to once again step up. Europe can’t afford to miss out. ByJenniferL.Schenker Editor-in-Chief,TheInnovator CLOSINGTHEDIGITAL SKILLSGAP THEBRIEF COVERSTORY 5G’SIMPACTONCOUNTRIES, CITIESANDCOMPANIES WHYCHINAWANTSTOLEAD THE5GCHARGE WHYTHEU.S.ANDEUROPE NEEDTOWININWIRELESS BARCELONA’SBIDTOBECOME AGLOBAL5GHUB TELEFÓNICAISUSING MOONSHOTSTOREINVENTITSELF HOWBLOCKCHAIN COULDTRANSFORM THETELECOMINDUSTRY ANDMORE THE25STARTUPSTOMEET AT4YFN CYBERCRIMEISGOINGMOBILE NEWWAYSOFCOLLABORATING INTHEWORKPLACE PUTTINGAR/VRTOWORK WHYGRAPHENESHOULDBE ONEVERYEXECUTIVE’SRADAR HOWUNILEVERFOUNDRY ALLOWSSTARTUPSTOCONNECT TOITS400BRANDS 5GANDNEWREGULATIONS AREEXPECTED TOHELPDRONESTAKEOFF P.05 P.06 P.08 P.11 P.14 P.16 P.20 P.22 P.24 P.26 P.30 P.32 P.34 P.38 P.40 TABLE OF CONTENTS — P.03
  • 6. THE IOTA FOUNDATION IOTA is overseen by the IOTA Foun- dation, a non-profit organisation dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around IOTA, develo- ping the DLT technology for real life applications and maintaining it license-free for all developers to work with. The Foundation gathers a team of world leading experts in the respective fields and sets up de- dicated working groups with com- panies and research institutions in those sectors to share know-how, initiate experimentation and proac- tively engage the startup communi- ty, innovators and developers. THE BACKBONE OF THE IOT IOTA is a revolutionary new transac- tional settlement and data transfer layer for the Internet of Things. It’s based on a new distributed ledger, the Tangle, which overcomes the inefficiencies of current Blockchain designs. IOTA is also the missing puzzle pie- ce for the Machine Economy to fully emerge and reach its desired poten- tial. It is envisioned to be the pub- lic, permissionless backbone for the Internet of Things,that enables true interoperability between all devices. ZERO FEES - INFINITELY SCALABLE Unlike blockchains, which are inhe- rently limited by the bottleneck of block size and rigid chain, which leads to congestion and high fees when usage goes up, IOTA’s Tangle gets more efficient the more activity occurs on the ledger. Perhaps more importantly, because the Tangle eli- minates the requirement of miners and stakers, newly mined units of currency and transaction fees do not need to be extracted from the system to pay validation fees. The result is that IOTA has zero fees. DATA INTEGRITY IOTA’s main features (in its current form) are feeless micropayments, secure data transfer and data an- choring. Combined with IOTA’s sca- lability and partition tolerance, the- se two features allow a plethora of use cases to be derived which are only possible with IOTA. The main focus of IOTA is the Inter- net of Things, with machines pay- ing each other autonomously for resources, services and/or access. INTRODUCING IOTAINTRODUCING IOTA Tangle Txs NetworkCapacity Blockchain www.iota.org / info@iota.org
  • 7. DIGITAL SKILLS At press time “thousands of people” from 66 countries had already pre-re- gistered for the free courses, which are aimed at both white collar and blue collar workers, says Adam Sherman, The forum’s community lead for the Information technology industry. “We have identified eight specific skill sets that we think all industries will need in the future,” says Sherman, a former president of the Highland Park, New Jersey, Board of Education. “While the platform is industry agnostic one of the sectors we want to zero in on is the manufacturing sector, which impacts a lot of workers globally. But we will also target sec- tors that will experience an equally significant impact from workforce changes, such as financial and legal services,” A CALL TO ACTION The initiative, which is committed to reaching one million people with resources and training opportunities on the SkillSET portal by January 2021, will be discussed as part of the ministerial agenda at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Feb. 28-March 1. “The Forum is great at catalyzing action around specific topics,” says Sherman. “We are hoping to grow the SkillSET platform which will be singularly focused on enabling new opportunities for individuals. Funding will ensure the platform’s rapid adoption, scalability and wide reach. We are trying to form partnerships with organizations that can really push this product to people who will most benefit from it. We really believe that this product can only be as powerful as the number of people who join and so we are actively looking to partner with businesses, govern- ments and NGOs.” SkillSET was conceived by the Forum’s IT Governors community under the chairmanship of Chuck Robbins, the chief executive officer of Cisco Systems. In addition to Cisco the founding partners are Accenture, CA Technologies, Cognizant, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Infosys, Pegasystems, PwC, Salesforce, SAP and Tata Consultancy Services. The Forum plans to target an additional nine million people for retraining by 2020 through another program called Closing the Skills Gap 2020, a call for top global businesses to lead training, reskilling and upskilling ini- tiatives between 2018 and 2020. To date, 26 global founding partners have signed up for Closing the Skills Gap and have collectively committed to providing training opportunities to over 8.1 million people by 2020. The program will be supported by a dedicated online platform, closingtheskillsgap.org (developed by Tata Consultancy Services), that aims to help businesses share insights and best practices around retraining their workforces. The goal of both programs, says Sherman, is to make sure that people with jobs in every industry are given the means to learn new skills so they can continue to be productive members of the global workforce. J.L.S. Roughly 50% of workers’ current activities – the equivalent of $15 trillion in global wages – could be automated by adopting current technologies, according to a briefing for corporate leaders compiled by the World Economic Forum. That said, new research quoted by the Forum suggests that 96% of all workers whose jobs are threatened by technology could find similar or better work with adequate training. The briefing, entitled “Enabling Employees to Thrive in the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” urges execu- tives to start preparing their workforce for the jobs of the future. The Forum is planning to offer a concrete way for companies to do just that. It is launching an app in April that will teach the basic skills it says any person will need in the digital economy. Users will have access free- of-charge to up-to-date, self-paced training materials designed by global IT companies, says Alan Marcus, the Forum’s head of technology, media and digital industries. The courses range from general business skills to introductory digital literacy to more advanced topics such as cybersecu- rity, Big Data or the Internet of Things. The portal – which will be called SkillSET and be accessible through a mobile app – will offer a tailored skills assessment to help users determine which coursework is the best fit. — P.05 ClosingtheDigital SkillsGap — Soon there will be an app for that.
  • 8. P.06 — THE INNOVATOR THE BRIEF The Olympic Games in Pyeongchang – thebackdropforwhatIntelclaimedwasthelargest real-world demonstration of a high-speed wireless networking technology called 5G – offered a glimpse of what’s to come. Attendees were able to watch live feeds from bobsledders’ helmet-mounted cameras or switch between multiple cameras placed along the cross- countryskiingroutetofollowracesusingSamsung 5G-equipped tablets. Some 100 cameras set up around Gangeung Ice Arena allowed for a 360º look at an ice skater performing a pirouette and selected guests were able to ride in a 5G-powered self-driving bus. At 10 gigabits a second, 5G won’t just be used for sports and entertainment. It will power smart factories, surgeries at a distance and autonomous vehicles. Rival Qualcomm was quick to point out that Intel’s gear was not “real 5G” as it does not conformtoatechnical standardpassedinDecember. Fon,aglobalWiFisharingnetwork,plansto announcedealswithcarriersduringMobile WorldCongressthat–iftheyworkas promised–willhelpsolveunevenWiFi coverageinsideconsumerhomes.Fontech HomeWiFi combinesnext-gensoftware,a simpleapplicationforendusersand advancedWiFiextenders,toenable operatorstoimproveandmanagecoverage andexperienceforusersathome,reducing operatorhelpdeskcostsandhome maintenancecalls. BREAKINGSPEED RECORDS Voicing APreference WiFiReboot In any case 5G handsets are not expected to be available for another year. But that is not stopping vendors–includingQualcommitself–frommaking announcements of their own and showing off 5G gear at Mobile World Congress. The show theme this year will be” 5G, 5G and 5G,” say industry analysts. Qualcomm planned demonstrations at MWC will showcase the Snapdragon X50 5G modem, which will be used in live, over-the-air mobile 5G trials with multiple global wireless network operators in different spectrum bands while everyone waits for 5G handsets to go on the market. Finland’s Nokia, China’s Huawei and Sweden’sEricssonwillalsoshowoff5Gnetworking equipment at MWC while carriers like Orange will talk up their upcoming 5G trials. VisitorsatMobileWorldCongresswillbe abletoexperiencetheintegrationofAmazon’svoice activated assistant Alexa in the SEAT Ateca model (SEAT is the first carmaker in Europe to integrate thisfeatureincars.)AmazonAlexawillenableSEAT drivers, using voice commands, to optimize their timewhileintheircarbydoingthingslikemanaging their personal schedule, finding songs, locating points of interest, real-time news or the nearest dealership, among many other functions. What will take-up of voice-activated assistants- which is projected to more than double this year globally – mean for the telecoms industry? Consumers may rely less on their mobile phones while on the go andathome.Thosewhoownin-homedigitalvoice assistants use their mobile phones less often for entertainment and online purchasing, according to one recent study. Amazon’svoice-activatedassistant AlexacanbeaccessedfrmaSEATAteca atthepushofabutton Thewintergames inPyeongchang arebeingusedtoshowcase5G
  • 9. THE BRIEF The telecom industry is poised to seize the greatest share of value from the implementation of blockchain technology, says the global consultancy Accenture in a report scheduled to be released at Mobile World Congress.Itisrecommendingthatcommunication service providers “build upon their existing ability to quickly and effectively exchange data acrosstheircollectivefive-billion-personnetwork” to construct a massive asset exchange network based on blockchain. The inherent strengths of telecom operators, which Accenture lists as “their large user base, Togettechnologynewsincontexteveryweek,subscribetoournewsletter:http://innovator.news — P.07 40% SHOULDOPERATORS PUTTHEIR NETWORKS ONTHEBLOCK? high speed, high fidelity, low latency networks, multi-layer security architecture, existing internetwork data exchange models, and rapid product offerings,” make telecommunications the perfect industry to harness blockchain’s full potential at scale, says the consultancy. By using the scaled existing capabilities, and collective assets of telecom operators at both the regional and global levels, “a coordinated, interoperable transfer network could feasibly be built upon blockchain,” Accenture says in its report. In addition to enormous disruptive potential, a coordinated blockchain could also ease operators’ internal operations and drive down costs, it says. In its report Accenture discusses a consortium that has already been formed by TBCASoft, a U.S.-based blockchain technology startup; and Japan’s Softbank, the U.S.’s Sprint, and Taiwan’s FarEasTone. The three carriers have already demonstrated a cross-carrier payment platform system using TBCASoft’s blockchain technology. Other telecom operators are expected to join. $1 Trillion Percentage of 3,600 large, global companies facing serious challenges from new entrants, according to a Disruptability Index scheduled to be released at Mobile World Congress by the consultancy Accenture. The Index positions 20 industries – including telecommunications, consumer technology, automotive, and retail – in four different states of disruption. It will also highlight how susceptible each industry is to future disruption. Size of the opportunity for telecom operators if they use blockchain to construct a massive asset exchange network that would cover their collective five-billion customers, according to a report that Accenture is scheduled to release at Mobile World Congress.
  • 10. HOW5GWILL IMPACTCOUNTRIES, CITIESAND COMPANIES P.08 — THE INNOVATOR Every five to ten years the telecoms industry introduces a new generation of wireless technology that it promises will change everything. This time it just might be true. If pundits are right, the emerging new high-speed wireless standard known as 5G could have the same impact as the printing press, electricity, the steam engine, the telegraph and the Internet. Each of these discoveries or inventions are known as General Purpose Technologies (GPTs) that have served as catalysts for transformative changes, redefining work processes and rewriting the rules of competitive economic advantage. And 5G is expected to pack the same kind of punch. “The emergence of 5G is a fulcrum in the evolution of mobile technology from a technology that had transformative impact on personal communications to a true GPT that promises to transform entire industries and economies,” says a report by IHS Markit and Berkeley Research Group that assesses the importance of 5G technology to the global economy. Indeed, the report predicts that by 2035 5G will create 22 million new jobs globally,directlygenerate$3.5trillionineconomicactivityandfuelsustainable long-termgrowthtoglobalrealGDP.From2020to2035,thetotalcontribution of 5G to real global GDP will be equivalent to an economy the size of India, says the report. “5G is expected to impact the competiveness of nations,” says Sam Paltridge, an analyst in the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation’sDirectorateofScienceTechnologyandIndustry,whoiscurrently working on a study on the topic. China views 5G as key to helping it become a tech leader not just in wireless but in The Internet of Things and artificial intelligence while at the same time boosting its own industries over those of others. (See the story on pages 11-13.) The U.S., which is projected to initially lead in the number of 5G subscribers, is expected to be quickly surpassed by China, as is Europe, which has high ambitions of its own for the rollout of the technology. (See the story on pages 14 and 15.) The United States and China are expected to dominate 5G R&D and capital expenditure, investing a total of $1.2 trillion and $1.1 trillion respectively, says the IHS Markit and Berkeley Research Group report. Major investments will be made in 5G in Europe as well, and these are expected to have “trickle-down”impactsacrossthewholeoftheEuropeaneconomy,potentially generating €141.8 billion in new revenues across the EU and creating 2.39millionjobs,accordingtoareportpreparedfortheEuropeanCommission’s Directorate General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology by Trinity College Dublin, the wireless advisory firm realwireless, the mobile technology research firm InterDigital and the research consultancy tech4i2. So why will 5G be so different? (See the box.) Unlike mobile technologies adopted to date, 5G is expected to radically transform the public and industrial sectors of economies. 5G could enable about 4.6% of global real output in 2035, though its uptake by industry is expected to vary. (See the chart on page 10.) Most notable, says the IHS Markit and Berkeley Research Group report, is that 5G could enable 6.5% of public service and 6.4% of agricultural output by 2035, transforming other sectors of the economy. Autonomous Cars and Drones According to the report to the European Commission, 5G will have a big impact on the auto industry. It will enhance connectivity and improve data management and sharing between automotive manufacturers and motorists, COVER STORY — 5G is expected to create 22 million new jobs, generate trillions of dollars in economic activity and fuel sustainable long-term growth to global real GDP. By Jennifer L. Schenker
  • 11. — P.09 and provide opportunities for next-generation services within the automotive industry and the supply chain, allowing further improvement in vehicle design, vehicle production and performance. 5G networks will have the ability to support a large number of connected cars, provide always-on connections, focus on optimizing energy efficiency, provide real-time maintenance and enhance safety, the report says. 5Gisalsoexpectedtohelpusherinautonomouscarsandthemorewidespread use–andcontrol–ofdrones.Theavailabilityofdriverlesscarsandunmanned aerial vehicles will do more than stimulate sales to consumers, says the report. They will also be deployed in agricultural and mining applications ranging from surveillance of remote natural resources to autonomous transport of metals or valuable minerals to self-driving tractors. Autonomous vehicles will also be widely used in the transportation sector for driverless transport and for delivery of commercial and consumer goods. Municipalities will integrate autonomous vehicles into their transit systems while using drones for monitoring functions. In manufacturing, autonomous vehicles will also be used in intra-plant stocking and retrieval systems. And they are expected to positively affect the insurance industry as vehicle accident rates decrease. Factories 5G will aid industrial automation by enabling and enhancing the critical control of production-line robotics, including tethered or untethered robots that can be controlled, monitored and reconfigured remotely, making manufacturing more efficient. WHAT IS 5G? 5G is short for fifth generational wireless broadband technolo- gy. It has three main distinguishing characteristics that will help enable mission-critical applications such as autonomous vehicles, management of drones, industrial automation, smart grids and remote surgeries and patient monitoring. Speed: 5G will be approximately 10 times faster than existing wireless networks. Better Response Times: The technology’s ultra-low latency allows things in the virtual world to sync with the real world, leading to a new paradigm known as Synchronized Reality. It will enable the transfer of expertise over great distances in real-time using robotics and haptic feedback. More Capacity: Lower power requirements, the ability to operate in licensed and unlicensed spectrum and lower costs will enable a greater number of devices to connect using higher volumes of data, ushering in the age of the so-called Massive Internet of Things. 5Gisexpectedtoaidindustrial automation.
  • 12. P.10— THE INNOVATOR Healthcare 5G is expected to enhance connectivity and improve data management and sharing between healthcare providers, medical device manufactures, patients, medical and life insurers, the pharmaceutical industry and other stakeholders. Reducing the cost of health monitors, expanding their reach and their reliability also has the potential to unleash many innovations in the sector, according to the report to the European Commission. Utilities By 2020 utilities are expected to account for two-thirds of the 30 billion wireless connected devices in houses and industry worldwide. Strategic benefits of installing smart meters with embedded 5G capabilities will arise from increased access to data and real-time information provision, says the report to the European Commission. This will support efficient energy generation, enabling savings in generation capacity, particularly during periods of high demand. When supply loads are shifted from peak to off- peak periods, electricity providers observe savings in short-term marginal costs due to lower generation costs. The load shifting between peak and off-peak periods reduces the size of capacity investment in electricity. The reportfoundthat5Gdatacapabilitiesinsmartmeterswillprovideoperational benefits in the European utilities industry of €2.7 billion in 2025 and €3.1 billion in 2030. Smart Cities Enhanced access to information from numerous sensors located throughout smart cities in households, workplaces, from transport routes, citizens and platforms will provide policymakers with better real-time data about their cities. For example 5G is expected to improve transportation in cities in multiple ways. Greater access to real-time information by travelers should enable faster journey times within and between cities. Greater access to real-time information by transport providers should enable better co- ordination between different transport modes. And enhanced information about traffic flows and journeys should help traffic controllers better manage traffic, says the report for the European Commission. 5G data capabilities are projected to provide €8.1 billion in congestion, accident and pollution reduction benefits to smart cities in Europe by 2025, according to the report to the European Commission. A Step Change for the Mobile Sector Among the industries that look set to be changed by 5G is the mobile sector itself. Internet giants don’t rebuild the network from scratch every five to ten years but the telecom industry has been doing just that, an expensive and long process that requires spectrum allocation, licensing fees, regulatory permissions to install equipment and the purchasing and maintenance of proprietary gear. European mobile phone companies spent $129 billion on 3G mobile licenses alone in 2000 only to shell out billions more a few years later for 4G licenses andequipment. Thecostofbuildingout5GnetworksinEuropeisconservatively estimated to be around $56.6 billion, according to the report prepared for the European Commission. The good news is that 5G is software-based and will run on commodity hardware. “Since it is now software driven the next generations will not be advanced on a system but on a feature basis,” says Mischa Dohler, head of the Centre for Telecoms Research at King’s College in London and a former employee at the global telecoms operator Orange. “Therefore it will be much quicker to upgrade. I predict we will not have a 6G.” In any case 5G looks poised to be the wireless broadband standard for the foreseeable future, and if analysts are right, embracing it will be necessary for any country, city or company that wants to gain the speed, scope and scale to take part in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. COVER STORY INDUSTRY Ag.,forestry & fishing Arts & entertainment Construction Education Financial & insurance Health & social work Hospitality Info & communications Manufacturing Mining & quarrying Professional services Public service Real estate activities Transport & storage Utilities Wholesale & retail All industry sectors Enhanced Mobile Broadband Massive Internet of Things Mission Critical Services 5G -enabled output ( 2016$, M) Percent of industry output $510 65 742 277 676 119 562 1,421 3,364 249 623 1,066 400 659 273 1,295 $12,300$4,300$3,600$4,400 6,4% 3,5% 4,7% 3,5% 4,6% 2,3% 4,8% 11,5% 4,2% 4,1% 3,7% 6,5% 2,4% 5,6% 4,5% 3,4% 4,6% 5G WILL ENABLE $12 TRILLION OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT GLOBAL ECONOMIC ACTIVITY IN 2035 No impact High impact Source IHS
  • 13. train computers and develop artificial intelligence (AI), a field China has vowed to lead. Serving the world’s largest population and a vast domestic market, China’s tech companies can potentially collect data on a much greater scale than their counterparts elsewhere. The rewards could be huge. Accenture, the global consultancy, estimates that the IoT could deliver gains of up to $1.8 trillion in cumulative GDP for China by 2030 through the transformation of manufacturing, transportation, resources and utilities. Eric Schmidt, a former CEO of Google and former chairman of Alphabet, is among the business leaders who believe China will fulfil its AI ambitions. “By 2020, they will have caught up. By 2025, they will be better than us. By 2030, they will dominate the industries,” Schmidt said at the Artificial Intelligence and Global Security Summit in Washington in November. A Boost to Self-Driving Cars One of the most profound applications of AI and the IoT is likely to be self- driving cars, which could transform economies around the world. “The main difference that 5G will make is the realization of the Internet of China is undeterred by worries that consumers and companies won’t pay more for faster, more responsive connectivity: The country’s leaders see 5G as an important stepping stone on the road to becoming a global tech powerhouse to rival the United States. “China will be a global leader in terms of scale and investment in 5G because it is a high-priority national strategy,” says Edison Lee, head of telecom research at Jefferies in Hong Kong. “In other countries, 5G is being driven by operators looking to gain a competitive advantage; in China it is part of its national goal to become a leading digital country.” The logic goes like this: 5G is designed to support a massive expansion in the Internet of Things (IoT) – a shorthand term for connecting all kinds of machines, devices and vehicles to each other and to the Internet. All this connectivity will generate vast amounts of data about the world, which can be used to — P.11 — Rolling out the technology is part of a “high-priority national strategy” to become a global tech powerhouse By David Pringle WhyChinaWants toLead the5GCharge
  • 14. P.12 — THE INNOVATOR COVER STORY Things,” says Markus Seidel, head of BMW Group Technology Office China. “For the auto industry, it will greatly boost the development of autonomous driving.” Having launched its ConnectedDrive service in China as early as August 2012, BMW is using 4G cellular connectivity to provide its Chinese customers with concierge services, automated emergency calls and real- time traffic information, along with remote-control functionality. The next step for BMW is to trial 5G connectivity, but Seidel says the timing will depend on how fast telecoms operators deploy the new technology. China Mobile, in particular, is making a big bet on the IoT. It has said it will pay out 2 billion yuan ($303 million) as subsidies to IoT device makers. China Mobile plans to add another 120 million IoT connections in 2018, taking its total to about 320 million, as it scrambles to connect all kinds of products to the internet, including home appliances, vehicles, and water and gas meters. Made in China 2025 As the world’s workshop, China is naturally looking to use 5G and the IoT to transform its manufacturing sector. The Chinese government’s “Made in China 2025” initiative has echoes of Germany’s “Industrie 4.0” program to transform manufacturing through automation. Connected robots and assembly lines can exchange information in real- time, giving each other early notice of potential faults, changes in production schedules and supply shortages. “5G can enable and enhance critical control of production line robotics,” says Zhiwei Zhang, head of marketing for Ericsson North East Asia. “This includes tethered or untethered robots that are controlled, monitored, and can be reconfigured remotely. This technology could be used in factory floor production, reconfiguration and layout changes, real-time analysis and even to steer a robot’s movement from a remote location.” “China has a vision to be a world leader in precision manufacturing,” says Sylwia Kechiche, lead analyst at GSMA Intelligence, “China is pushing hard to automate factories.” She points to the rapid rollout of 4G as an example of how fast China can deploy new technologies when the government plays a coordinating role. China’s operators have implemented 4G much faster and more comprehensively than their European counterparts. One of the biggest changes between 4G and 5G will be the responsiveness and density of IoT connectivity, says Low latency connections will enable the so-called tactile Internet in which people will be able to remotely control machines as if they had them in their hands. Remote-controlled machines could be used to carry out otherwise hazardous inspection and maintenance of infrastructure, as well as enable humans to stay out of clean-room environments. The Internet of Everything, Including Camels As well as making its cities smarter and greener, China is using the IoT to help rural areas develop and become more prosperous. In Alxa League, a remote part of Inner Mongolia known as the “Hometown of Camels,” China Mobile is enabling local people to track the location of their camels using cellular connectivity. The animals wear solar-powered necklets, equipped with a GPS chip and a cellular connection, which can transmit their whereabouts to their owners’ cellphones. If the system detects a camel moving at an abnormal speed or the herd goes beyond the grazing range, it will send an alert. China Mobile estimates this “intelligent grazing system” can save each family nearly 50,000 yuan by reducing losses and improving grazing. With the arrival of 5G, agriculture will be transformed CHINA — FORECAST FOR 5G CONNECTIONS Source: The GSMA 5G connections (million) 4 44 117 227 354 428 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
  • 15. — P.13 country’s largest mobile operator, has said it will deploy 10,000 5G base stations by 2020. Edison Lee at Jefferies expects major cities in China to have 5G coverage by the end of 2020, with capital spending on 5G networks peaking in the country in 2021 and 2022. For China, Lee says the benefits of deploying the technology fast are twofold: China will be able to claim many of the patents underpinning 5G technologies, while scaling up will reduce the unit cost of the equipment and encourage the rest of the world to adopt 5G earlier than would have been the case. Indeed, China is hoping that its equipment makers, such as Huawei and ZTE, will be leading suppliers of 5G technologies to other countries. The China Academy of Information and Communications Technology (CAICT) has estimated that 5G-related revenue for network equipment and handset manufacturers will reach a total of around 17.5 trillion yuan ($2.8 trillion) between 2020 and 2030, according to a report by Telegeography. CAICT believes the network operators themselves will see total revenue from 5G reach roughly 7.9 trillion yuan between 2020 and 2030. To be sure, China is cooperating, as well as competing, with the West on AI and 5G. For example, researchers at Edinburgh University and experts at the Chinese telecoms equipment maker Huawei are working together on the development of robots supported by 5G. Teams from Huawei’s Wireless X Labs and the University’s new Bayes Centre are “investigating how AI systems can use wireless 5G networks to provide optimum support for connected robotics and autonomous systems,” according to a press release. Such research highlights the interdependence of 5G, the IoT and AI. For China, the strategic aim is nothing less than global leadership in all three technologies, a goal it looks poised to achieve. further still, making it possible for connected drones to stream live footage of animals to their owners, while also surveying the surrounding landscape. At a China Mobile event in Shenzhen in November, ZTE demonstrated how a 5G-enabled drone can transmit high-definition images to the cloud and generate topographic maps in just a few seconds. Huge Investment Needed But this kind of high-tech wizardry won’t be cheap. The research arm of China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology expects China’s three mobile operators – China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom – to invest a total of 2.8 trillion yuan ($411 billion) in 5G technologies between 2020 and 2030, with annual spending peaking at 313.3 billion yuan in 2023, according to the South China Morning Post. Why is 5G so expensive? Early commercial rollouts are likely to require investment in small cells and transmission upgrades, with fiber backhaul providing transmission speeds of 10 Gbps and sub-10 millisecond responsiveness, according to a report by GSMA Intelligence. Moreover, if they are to serve mission-critical applications, such as remote surgery, 5G networks will need to be ultra-reliable. They will have to deliver a “very high quality of service and uptime burden when the stakes are life and death, rather than just a great service,” the report notes. Ahead of Schedule In November 2017, China started the third phase of its 5G technology research and development tests, ahead of schedule. China Mobile, the 5Gwillmakeiteasierforpeople inInnerMongoliatotracktheircamelswithdrones.
  • 16. P.14 — THE INNOVATOR Therehasalwaysbeenafiercerivalryamongstwirelessoperators andequipmentmakerstobefirsttomarketwithanewtechnology.But when it comes to 5G the stakes could be considerably higher. Racing ahead in 5G could help China dominate in the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence – boosting its GDP and industries over those in other countries and regions. (See the story on pages 11-13.) Operators in North America and East Asia are leading the race to deploy 5G. Europe is expected to lag behind by at least a year, with some analysts predicting that EU 5G coverage may be limited to a few city centers and airports until 2022-2023. “There are some challenges that Europe clearly faces,” says Kester Mann, a principal analyst at CCS Insight, a UK-based research firm focused on the global wireless sector. “It won’t be among the leading regions.” U.S. Rollout Like China, the U.S. will be a leading adopter of 5G. But the rollout will be less systematic and more ad-hoc. The largest U.S. telecoms companies, AT&T and Verizon, are planning to launch 5G services as early as this year. However, these early deployments are focused primarily on serving fixed connections – linking to a 5G receiver in a customer’s home or office, rather than to a mobile device. Sprint announced it would launch a nationwide 5G network in the first half of 2019 in the U.S. While that could leave the operator behind rivals AT&T and Verizon Wireless in terms of deployment, Sprint says it will offer more extensive coverage, rather than just a few cities. It would also be ahead of T-Mobile, which plans its rollout for 2020. TheRaceIsOn — Why the U.S. and Europe need to win in wireless. By Jennifer L. Schenker and David Pringle COVER STORY Europe’s Operators Take Cautious Approach Europe also has big ambitions. In addition to a number of pan-EU trials, it is planning extensive smart-city trials and European operators are already announcing plans. Orange, for example, says it will launch France’s first- ever end-to-end test in the northern cities of Lille and Douai between mid- 2018 and mid-2019 as soon it has the necessary authorizations. And the UEFA EURO 2020 soccer championship games, which will be played in 13 different cities in Europe, will be used to showcase 5G. But mobile operators are taking a cautious approach to network rollouts. They complain that the EU isn’t creating the right regulatory environment to attract sufficient investment. In particular, they are unhappy that more in-market consolidation has been blocked and there isn’t greater pan-EU coordination of spectrum policy. Some countries are likely to make spectrum available much later than others, making it tough for the industry to gain economies of scale. This was one of the reasons 4G was rolled out more slowly in Europe than in the U.S. and East Asia. Local Projects With Big Ambitions While it seems almost certain that the region will not be an international frontrunner in the next generation of wireless technology, that is not stopping some European countries and cities from vying to become global 5G leaders in their own right. For example, Barcelona aims to harness the city’s scientific and technology startup strengths as well as its ties to the annual Mobile World Congress to become an international 5G hub. (See the story on pages 16-18.)
  • 17. Research centers located in Barcelona are focusing on 22 of the 37 European 5G research areas. While they and others involved in what is known as the 5GBarcelona initiative are participating in EU programs, they also want to create their own independent initiatives in order to attract international companies to test 5G technology in the city, says Carlos Grau, director of Mobile World Capital, the Barcelona-based nonprofit organization that helps organize Mobile World Congress and 4YFN, a sister conference focused on startups and innovation taking place at the same time. The goal is to boost the local economy and create jobs in Barcelona. Meanwhile, in the UK, three British universities – King’s College London, Bristol University and the University of Surrey – are being linked up via 5G test beds thanks to a £16 million investment from the UK government to fund the first trials of end-to-end 5G systems. The University of Surrey’s 5G Innovation Centre, which is leading the project, is developing 5G radio technologies and a fully virtualized mobile core network; Bristol University is charged with deploying 5G capability in extensive “Smart City” and “Smart Campus” test beds, targeting full 5G and fiber infrastructure convergence; while King’s College London is driving ultra-low latency 5G tactile Internet developments with so-called “Internet of Skills” applications, which enable the transfer of expertise over great distances in real-time using robotics and haptic feedback. Ultra-low latency allows things in the virtual world to sync with the real- world, enabling a new paradigm known as Synchronized Reality. Uses include remotely controlling or repairing machines or conducting surgery on a patient from a distance. Through the King’s College London 5G initiative, the university is also co-designing 5G approaches with various sectors, including smart cities, smart transport, performing arts and health. The focus on specific industry vertical use cases is key, says Mischa Dohler, head of the Centre for Telecoms Research at King’s College and a former employee at the global telecoms operator Orange. “We have been out there talking to cultural spaces, big airports like Heathrow and hospitals,” he says. “There is a lot of appetite for low latency. Synchronized reality will permit manipulation of mission-critical applications at a distance. By creating demand we are ensuring that industry will understand what is the value and will not question the cost.” In December the global mobile operator Vodafone, Ericsson and King’s College performed what they said were the first successful 5G tests in the UK that work independently of 4G technology. King’s College was one of only a few applicants chosen by the global telecoms gear-maker Ericsson to test its 5G equipment. “That is important because King’s College is among the first to have an end-to- end coordinated system thanks to Ericsson and our in-house developments,” Dohler says. Rolling out such end-to-end systems nationwide will require the installation of 5G-specific antennas, a costly, time-consuming process for mobile operators. Dohler, a member of the spectrum board of Ofcom, the UK telecoms regulatory agency, says the country may have found a way around thisproblem.“WhatIhaveproposedtotheNationalInfrastructureCommission in the UK is a framework that would allow operators to negotiate a license to roll out antennas to all public street furniture in the country rather than having to do this on a regional or city scale,” says Dohler. “This would be a major game-changer and make rollout much faster and economical.” Reasons for Optimism While all 5G frequencies will not be available in the UK until 2020 due to spectrum availability issues, Dohler believes it is possible to build what he calls “100% of perceived coverage” by creating hotspots that would allow the pre-buffering of bandwidth-hogging applications while in a coverage zone. “The regulatory issues are not easy but they are not impossible,” he says. There are also some other reasons for optimism. In the past wireless standards have been reliant on the development of hardware that had to be designed, installed and maintained by engineers. But 5G can run over commodity hardware, widening the field to new entrants. “5G is now a software industry and Europe is good at software – particularly B2B software,” says Dohler. 5G represents “an exciting opportunity” both for the UK and for Europe as a whole, he says, with the power to transform not just the tech sector, but all industries, for those countries, cities and companies that move fast enough to reap the advantages. — P.15 5G subscribers, millions (year end) Source: CCS Insight 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 North America 2.084024 13.69929 68.21391 136.9507 220.3113 301.3545 Western Europe 0 2.594615 15.83894 53.05347 116.8971 188.1054 China 1.970739 13.23471 93.8094 432.3648 736.6089 897.1792 5G FORECAST
  • 18. P.16 — THE INNOVATOR Barcelona’sBid toBecomeaGlobal 5GHub — The city aims to turn its wireless technology prowess into a local economic advantage. Barcelona doesn’t want to be known simply as the host city ofMobileWorldCongress, an annual international exhibition and conference that attracts over a 100,000 attendees. It aims to be at the center of the wireless industry all year long. “We want to position Barcelona as a leading global 5G hub,” says Sergi Figuerola Fernandez, chief technology and innovation officer at i2CAT, a Catalonian nonprofit research and innovation center that promotes R&D activities in information and communication technologies and future Internet. To that end, new local 5G projects in Barcelona focusing on four verticals – connected cars, healthcare, industrial applications and entertainment – will be announced during this year’s Mobile World Congress. The projects will include the participation of large international companies and telecom operators, says Carlos Grau, the head of Mobile World Capital, a nonprofit organization based in Barcelona that is behind Mobile World Congress and Four Years From Now (4YFN), a sister conference focused on digital disruption. Both conferences will take place in the city between February 26 and March 1. 5G, a big focus at Mobile World Congress 2018, TheTorreGlòries,formerlyknownasTorreAgbar, inthe22@district,theheartofBarcelona’sstartupsector, whichisrankedfifthinEurope. Thecityhopestoleverageitstechstrengths tobecomeaninternational5Ghub.
  • 19. promises to open the way for the generation of new services in areas such as autonomous and connected vehicles, drone-based services, access to remote health services and smart manufacturing, the use of advances in robotics, artificial intelligence, material science, 3D printing and the Internet of Things to allow every object in a factory to communicate with the others. An International Testbed Cities, countries and companies that move fast to adopt 5G are expected to gain a significant economic boost. (See the story on pages 8-10.) With that goal in mind i2CAT, Mobile World Capital, the government of Catalonia, the Barcelona City Council, the Telecommunications Technology Centre of Catalonia (CTTC), the Polytechnical University of Catalonia (UPC) and the research lab of Atos, a European IT services company, signed an agreement in January in support what is being called the 5GBarcelona initiative. During the course of 2018, as part of the next phase of the European — P.17 COVER STORY Union’s 5G-Public Private Partnership program, the European Commission will select a small number of projects for 5G testing and validation. 5GBarcelona aspires to be one of those projects. Barcelona is also already acting as a public test bed for 5G through the European Commission’s 5GCity project. But Barcelona’s ambitions are larger than just being part of pan-European projects, stresses Grau. It wants to translate its 5G prowess into a local economic advantage. Major investment in 5G is expected to have “trickle-down” impacts across the whole of the European economy, potentially generating €141.8 billion in new revenues across the EU and creating 2.39 million jobs, according to a 2016 report prepared for the European Commission’s Directorate General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology by Trinity College Dublin, the wireless advisory firm realwireless, the mobile technology research firm InterDigital and the research consultancy tech4i2. The aim is to attract up to 12% of that revenue by “turning Barcelona into a global 5G testbed and attracting the digital units of large corporations to relocate here,” says Grau. “We don’t want to just be experts in antennas CarlosGrau, MobileWorldCapitalDirector “We wanttodifferentiate ourselvesfrom techhubslikeLondon andBerlinbyanalyzing thescenariosinwhich 5Gcouldbeusedand anticipatingtheeconomic impactofnewuses andnewservices.” BARCELONA’S STRENGTHS — ItistheheadquartersofMobileWorldCapital,theorganizer ofMobileWorldCongress.FoundingpartnersareSpain’s MinistryofIndustry,EnergyandTourism;thegovernmentof Catalonia;theBarcelonaCityCouncilandtheGSMA,anindustry tradebodythatrepresentstheinterestofoperators worldwide.Privatesectorpartnersincludethetelecom operatorsTelefonica,VodafoneandOrange. — Fourscientificresearchcentersfocusedon22oftheEU’s37 5Gprogramsarebasedthereasisi2CAT,theCatalonia government’scommunicationsresearchcenter. — BarcelonaisrankedfifthinEuropewhenitcomestonumber ofstartupsandtheirsize,qualityandinvestmentrounds. — Itishometolargecorporationsthathavedecidedtoembrace 5G,suchasthecarmakerSEAT,aunitoftheVolkswagengroup. — Thecityisexperimentingwith5Gtechnologiesaspartof whatitcallsan“openlivinglab”togaugethetechnology’s impactonitsfuture. — Barcelona’sFootballClubhasagreedtotest5Ggearinthecity’s stadium — TheSpanishgovernmentjustagreedtoheadquarter anew”5GObservatory”toanalyzeusecasesfor5Gandtheir projectedeconomicimpactonSpaininthecity.
  • 20. P.18 — THE INNOVATOR COVER STORY and chips. We want to differentiate ourselves from tech hubs like London and Berlin by analyzing the scenarios in which 5G could be used and anticipating the economic impact of new uses and new services.” Involving Barcelona’s Residents One of 5GBarcelona’s goals is to establish an open experimental infrastructure inthemetropolitanarea,whichwillserveasanurban,citizen-ledtechnological laboratory for validating 5G technologies and services, says Francesca Bria, the city’s chief technology and innovation officer, an advisor for the European Commission on Future Internet and Smart Cities policy, a member of the EC Expert Group on Open Innovation (OISPG) and a member of the European Research Cluster on the Internet of Things (IERC). To that end, in the run-up to Mobile World Congress, the city organized what it calls “Mobile Week Barcelona” from February 15 to 24. During the week-long event, Barcelona’s districts were converted into “places for open debate, creativity and learning as a means of reflecting on how digital transformation will change everyday life.” Mobile Week fits in with existing initiatives launched by the city of Barcelona that allow for “new forms of policy-making that are open, experimental and able to build in the collective intelligence of citizens” according to the city’s website. “This needs to happen from the bottom up,” says Bria. “By putting citizens at the center, we also aim to increase their digital sovereignty, enabling them to fully exercise their freedom and digital rights, including their right to data protection, privacy and information self-determination.” The city has launched a democracy platform called Decidim.Barcelona to experiment with new types of participatory democracy. It is also starting training programs to help people hone digital skills and it is attempting to show people that the addition of new types of technologies can lead to improvements in everyday life through programs that can be then scaled throughout the city. One example is the “Superblocks,” a participatory urban planning intervention that targets CO2 emission, closing off entire districts of the city to traffic and applying all the technological and environmental advances at the city council’s disposal to create more green spaces and improve air quality and the environment. As the technology evolves “it is important that the city itself can experience the changes that will be brought about by 5G,” says Bria. “We want to avoid a digital divide and we want to let the people see how this technology can be put to work for them. «At the same time we want our local industrial sector and SMEs in particular to be at the center of this technological revolution.” J.L.S. “Itisimportantthatthecity itselfcanexperiencethechanges thatwillbebroughtaboutby5G. Wewanttoavoidadigital divideandwewanttolet thepeopleseehowthis technologycanbeputtowork forthem.” FrancescaBria, Barcelona’s Chief Technology and Digital Innovation Officer
  • 21. WE NEED Y U “If you want to be a startup billionaire, you have to solve a billion peoples‘ problems” Thimo V. Schmitt-Lord MBE, Head of Bayer Foundations We believe in the game changing power of innovation – we support pioneers who apply tech innovations to humanity’s biggest challenges around heath and food. In 2018 we are scouting for Startups, Innovators, and Impact Innovations particularly focused on agriculture and food production for our seed funding programs and new book "The Beauty of Impact - Food". We are searching for innovations that solve the food crisis and other global grand health-related challenges that we can promote and fund to bring to the rising billions in need around the world. The next opportunity to meet the the Foundations CEO Thimo V. Schmitt-Lord and Open Innovation Hub Director and Speaker Marc Buckley is at 4YFN in Barcelona, Spain on Feb. 26-28 and at Skyberries in Vienna, Austria on Feb. 28-March 2. Seeking funding yourself for a crazy “innovation-4-good” idea? Get in touch with us at bayer.foundations@bayer.com. More Info: www.bayer-foundations.com
  • 22. P.20 — THE INNOVATOR Fearing that their core business will become a commodity, turning them into little more than “dumb pipes,” telecom operators have spent the last 30 years trying to reinvent themselves as everything from content providers to banks, with limited success. So now Telefónica is sending people trekking all the way to the Amazon jungle and Peruvian Andes to try and find radically different paths forward. One idea being explored by the global telecom operator is to become an energy service provider that will “redefine power generation for the 21st century.” To that end, it is exploring ways it could serve the three billion people globally who have no access to electricity or are stuck with unreliable service. It is also looking at how to apply advances in artificial intelligence and behavioral science to monitor and improve peoples’ health. These are just two of the “moon shots” being pursued by Telefónica’s Alpha, which is billed as Europe’s first moon shot factory. Telefónica has three well-established startup investment arms – Wayra, TelefónicaVenturesandAmérigo–and,likeotherbigcorporates,isconstantly developing new ways of approaching innovation internally. These efforts are primarily aimed at keeping the current business running and taking incremental steps in new directions. Alpha is a radically different program. It is completely separate from the core company, staffed primarily by outsiders and its goal is to help Telefónica branch into entirely new high-impact business lines in the future. “By our SeekingAlpha — Telefónica is attempting to define its future revenue and profitability through moon shots. TELECOMMUNICATIONS definition of a moon shot, there are only two moon-shot factories in the world: X [launched by Alphabet, Google’s parent company] and Alpha,” says Maurice Conti, Alpha’s chief innovation officer. Conti previously worked as Director of Applied Research & Innovation at the U.S. software giant Autodesk. He has expertise in applied machine learning, advanced robotics, augmented and virtual realities, and the future of work, cities and mobility and is a member of the faculty of future/io, a new European education and research institute focused on exponential technologies and desirable futures. Emulating a Scrappy Startup Conti and his team are responsible for coming up with ideas, prototypes and proofs of concepts that will go on to become full-blown moon shots, i.e. things that have not been tried before that will affect a 100 million people or more and grow into impactful businesses. The team is comprised of people who are not your typical phone company employee. “If you polled most of the people who work at Alpha I don’t think they would say they work for a big telephone company, but rather for a small, fast, scrappy startup that is exciting to be a part of,” says Conti. “This is partly due to the fact that Telefónica has come up with a very clever business model. Alpha is not an in-house center of innovation excellence – which we have all seen ad nauseam. They don’t work. We have the benefit of Telefónica’s support (without which we wouldn’t exist), but our identity is Alpha. It’s what we live and breathe every day. That’s part of what helps us attract a whole different kind of talent.” As an example Conti recalls how Alpha recently contacted a “crazy musician/ artist /hacker type and asked him to build a prototype – a VR thing. He was wary of working with Alpha. We were almost too corporate for him.” But, says Conti, “we talked him into it by showing him we’re not just corporate types, we have plenty of eccentric brilliant weirdos doing really groundbreaking stuff. So he came in and after four, five days he built this truly awesome prototype that incorporated some off-the-wall ideas which might have never occurred to us.” To Conti this is an example of how Alpha can attract brilliant people who are not interested in a big-name brand or big paycheck. “Most of the folks here are motivated by the opportunity to make a big difference in the world,” he says. The Alpha ideation team’s mission is to deliver new moon-shot ideas for board approval. The board is comprised of Telefónica CEO José María Álvarez-Pallete López (Alpha was his brainchild) and a group of Telefónica executives, scientists and Silicon Valley innovators. “If a moon shot is approved, Telefonica knows they may take up to a decade to become viable businesses, which means we can pursue challenges that are out of the reach of startups fueled by venture capital,” says Conti.
  • 23. “The ideation process is like a linear funnel,” he adds. “In the beginning, there are a lot of concepts, very rough ideas and a lot of assumptions. We use different methodologies like science fiction futures and Worldbuilding to come up with several dozen candidates. At the end of this phase we reduce it down to between five and ten and double down on them with more resources and prototyping – not just developing gizmos but prototyping business plans, thinking about potential collaborations and partnerships, exploring the bleeding edge of the relevant technologies, and generally envisioning what the world with this thing in it would look like.” During the process, the Alpha team start decreasing the amount of risk or number of leaps of faith. “We get down to three ideas and we go heavy and serious on all three, developing a robust business plan, market analysis and technology,” says Conti. “If the moon shot is intended for a certain part of the world, we go there and meet the people who intend to use this technology and do ethnographic research. We also seek to get external validation from the world’s top experts. We look for the top two or three people on the subject to get their feedback. Usually the projects are so interesting that even these folks – the best in the world at what they do – are willing to give their time and energy. Then, at the end of the process, we go from three to the one candidate that is going to be presented to the board and we do two things: we do everything we can to prove it is a solid moon shot and then we do everything we can to kill it.” The team tries to come up with a dozen questions designed to question the moon shot. “We’re actually super motivated to kill the moonshot before presenting it to the board,” says Conti. “No one wants to be working on something for the next decade that isn’t the very best idea we can come up with.” Shooting for the Moon So far two moon shots have been approved. Offering access to electricity to people who have no access or are underserved “could be both a very interesting large business and at the same time a net force for a good,” says Conti. “We believe there is a significant healthy long-term market in this space but I can’t share too much publicly. All I can tell you is we are sending people into the Amazon jungle and Andean mountain villages to work with these folks around what energy could mean.” Alpha is releasing few details about the health initiative. So what kind of other moon shots can we expect to see from Alpha? “We are not tasked with developing things like 6G [the next potential wireless broadband standard],” says Conti. “We’re here to solve some of the biggest problems facing society. We have no boundaries in the areas that we investigate so I’d say you should expect something big, audacious and, well, unexpected.” J.L.S. — P.21 Alphaemployeesspeaktopeople inanAndeanvillageaboutwhattypesofenergyservices couldmakesenseintheregion.
  • 24. Brian Behlendorf, a scheduled keynote speaker at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, is executive director of The Hyperledger Project, an open-source collaboration initiative hosted by the Linux Foundation. Its charter is to build a set of distributed ledger or blockchain technologies that can be used for a wide variety of purposes and embedded inside the emerging next- generation Internet. Behlendorf, a leading figure in the open-source software movement, was a primary developer of the Apache Web server, the most popular web server software on the Internet. He is a member of The World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Blockchain and is on the boards of directors of the Mozilla Foundation andTheElectronicFrontierFoundation. He recently agreed to speak to The Innovator’s editor-in-chief about how the telecommunications industry – and other sectors – might leverage blockchain technology. A consortium of telecom operators is being formed to construct a massive asset exchange network based on blockchain that would leverage and build upon their existing ability to exchange data across their collective five-billion-person network. Accenture calls it a $1 trillion opportunity for the industry. How do you foresee the telecoms industry using blockchain? —B.B.:The idea of telecom operators building something based on open- source distributed ledgers is not far fetched. The use of blockchain makes sense when you need to record a transaction or implement a directory. Inthetelecomssectorthereareseveral use cases worth thinking about. The simplest one is number portability: when a sim card is turned on you are assigned a phone number and when there is consensus to move that phone number with all of its transaction history you want to be sure that it is done in a way that is transparent and distributed. Q: What are some other possible use cases? — B.B.: Another potential use case is cross-border billing for using minutes or services on a number of different provider networks. Every transaction is tracked and reflected back on a bill to an end user. Before blockchain technology, the sector was limited to point-to-point integration of networks or centralized transaction hubs. This creates certain challenges. These centralized networks are great for P.22— THE INNOVATOR BLOCKCHAIN HowBlockchain MightTransform TheMobile Industry AndMore AnInterview With BrianBehlendorf, AscheduledkeynotespeakeratMobile WorldCongressinBarcelona
  • 25. passing around small payments and keeping track of lots and lots of small granular transactions, but when a problememergesorthereareattempts at malfeasance it is important to have a record in an immutable ledger shared between network providers. The blockchain provides a good way, when problems do emerge, to have an audit trail back to understand what was the change and who was responsible for it. Could telecoms also use blockchain to generate new sources of revenues? — B.B.: Digital identity services are one potentially very large opportunity for today’s retail network operators. There are very few other sectors that have billing relationships with such a broad segment of the population. Globally, there are 1.1 billion people in the world who do not have formal identity documents and thus can’t open a bank account or even have access to government services. There have been attempts to address this with digital identity solutions, such as Aadhaar, a national biometric identity program in India created by the tech entrepreneur Nandan Nilekani. But there are significant challenges with such centralized directories, whether from corruption and abuse or simply because they are like big honeypots that are vulnerable to hacking. So to address this we have a project called Hyperledger Indy, which implements a different concept for digital identity called “Self-Sovereign Identity.” In such a system individuals manage their personal data in something more personal and closer, likeadigitalwallet,whichholdsdigital equivalents of drivers licenses, birth certificates, diplomas, titles to your house,healthrecordsandmore. Such a wallet uses a distributed ledger to record your signatures, and other signatures on these documents, so you can prove they are valid when you present them to others. The data remains stored at the source – with the person it concerns – and each person could keep track of whom they share the data with. Permissions and access history would all be recorded, and the original data would stay safe. Telecom companies are in a unique position to assist with the rollout of such a service, because of the direct retail consumer relationship they have with so many individuals. Furthermore,asimcardcanhelpattest to who a person is or assist in resetting in case of lost ID. Will people trust their phone companies to handle their identities? — B.B.: There are three sectors – telcoms, banking and government – that many people love to hate. That is one of the challenges. But what M-Pesa [a mobile phone-based money transfer, financing and microfinancing service, launched in 2007 by Vodafone for Safaricom and Vodacom, the largest mobile network operators in Kenya] demonstrated is that telecom operators have the reach – even more so than financial service companies. Banks are closing retail branches everywhere, whereas, especially in the developing world, every bodega or kiosk operator is selling added minutes or can help you with transferring money via mobile phones. That is why telecom operators are in a great position to be the touch point for managing digital identity. What other sectors are likely to use blockchain? — B.B.: Any sector that has to deal with real problems involving trust. Supply chains of all sorts. The diamond industry has an active blockchain project this year. Food safety projects, such as one involving IBM and Walmart, that seek to track the provenance of everything from pork to mangos or salmon. In healthcareitcanbeusedforthesupply chain of pharmaceuticals or the sharing of medical records. Telecom can’t be too far behind from what we see, but now is the time for this industry to get things rolling. Hyperledger is here to help. Are we at the top of the blockchain hype cycle? —B.B.:It does feel like there is some over-cheerleading, but blockchain will be transformational. It’s a technology that makes it easy to record and verify and easy to have a memory. This is something that will impact every business. It is a bit like the Internet in the days when it moved from being a research platform and a place to play with tech to a platform for how business was changed. If your business has lots of transactions and is working with a large number of parties where trust is always an issue then you should be doing research and be developing a plan for deploying blockchain. You should have someone on your innovation team or somebody from IT doing a proof of concept internally so that you start to get the physics of the technology, in the same way that in the mid- 1990s Fortune 1000 companies were getting the sense of the physics of this thing called the Internet. A lot of blockchain technology is still early but not so early that you can’t apply it to a real business need today. What other advice do you have for executives at big companies that are considering deploying blockchain? — B.B.: There is no such thing as a blockchain of one. The technology is about coordinating interactions between parties. So first you need to be talking to the other participants in your value chain, the people you buy from, sell to and perhaps even your competitors. Then you need to ask yourselves “how do we demonstrate that applying blockchain for this use will have commercial value?” You need to be having conversations about common use cases and to put in some R&D effort work to see what’s worth doing and then make it happen. J.L.S. — P.23 “Telecom operatorsare inagreat positionto bethetouch pointfor managing digitalidentity”
  • 26. P.24 — THE INNOVATOR THETOP25 STARTUPS TOMEETAT4YFN INBARCELONAEach year 4YFN gathers hundreds of innovative startups from around the world to pitch to investors and corporates. The Innovator selected the 25 startups we think would be most interesting to big business. CYBERSECURITY EVERSPIN SOUTHKOREA WHATITDOES:Everspin’s security platform is designed for industries adopting IoT systems. It is focused on protecting increasingly connected production and manufacturing facilities from growing cybersecurity threats. http://www.everspin.co.kr/ CYBERSECURITY EXCALIBUR SLOVAKIA WHATITDOES:Excaliburletscompaniesturntheir employees’smartphonesintosecuretokensthat canbeusedtoaccessenterprisesystemsinplaceof passwords.Theideaistoeventuallyeliminateall corporatepasswordsandreplacethemwitha dynamicsecuritysystemthatismoredifficultto hack. https://getexcalibur.com BLOCKCHAIN VALIDATED ID SPAIN WHATITDOES:An ID validation system for businesses based on blockchain technologies. It allows companies to centrally manage identification for customers and partners to facilitate transac- tions and sales. http://www.validatedid.com ANALYTICS VIISIGHTS ISRAEL WHATITDOES:The company uses software, deep learning, and cognitive computing to power a platform that analyzes video for smart city applications, connected businesses, security, and other IoT uses. The processing is fast enough to provide real-time warnings and alerts. http://www.viisights.com ANALYTICS BITPHY SPAIN WHATITDOES:Provides predictive business intelligence based on AI, IoT and Big Data for the retail sector. www.bitphy.es CYBERSECURITY COUNTERCRAFT SPAIN WHATITDOES: CounterCraft uses a new security technique called ” deception” to fight hackers. The tactics assume hackers will get into a system and attempts to trick them and manipulate them to minimize damage and theft. https://www.countercraft.eu AUGMENTEDREALITY WIDEUM SPAIN WHATITDOES:Wideum makes smart glasses called Remote Eye, which are aimed at heavy industrial users and manufacturers. Remote Eye delivers live video feeds and uses augmented reality to allow companies to provide remote support to technicians in the field. http://www.remoteeye.com ENVIRONMENT TRACKSCO2 SPAIN WHATITDOES:AnEthereumblockchainsystem thatallowscompaniestosignsmartcontractsto offsettheircarbonemissions.Thesystemaimsto connectcorporateclientswithvarious environmentalprojectsaroundtheworld. http://tracksco2.com/ FOOD EVJA ITALY WHATITDOES:Hardware and software system that draws information from sensors installed in fields. A farmer can monitor this information on things like temperature and humidity to make decisions and, in some cases, even benefit from predictive models for advance warnings on potential threats such as various plant diseases. http://www.evja.eu HEALTH IOMED MEDICAL SOLUTIONS SPAIN WHATITDOES:Providesadigitalplatformfor managingunstructureddatageneratedbydoctors andhospitals.Inaddition,theserviceanalyzesthe aggregatedataitgathersusingAItoprovideanalytics onpatientcareandhospitaloperations. http://www.iomed.es ROBOTICS LUXROBO SOUTHKOREA WHATITDOES:Luxrobo sells MODI, a modular system that lets users design and build their own IoT and robotic devices. MODI’s clients include small businesses looking to develop basic IoT devices. http://www.luxrobo.com
  • 27. — P.25 MOBILITY ECCOCAR SPAIN WHATITDOES:Develops a car-sharing platform businesses can use to manage fleets of cars and trucks. Administrators control the system from the back end but employees can book and serve vehicles directly through a mobile app. http://www.eccocar.com/en/ BLOCKCHAIN JELURIDA NETHERLANDS WHATITDOES:Develops tools to allow mains- tream business to build products and services that leverage blockchain technologies. Its blockchain-as-a-service approach has been used to create voting systems, transactions, and some basic monetary exchanges. http://www.jelurida.com MOBILITY TERAKI GERMANY WHATITDOES:Terakimakessoftwarethattaps intothegrowingamountsofdatageneratedbycars tobetterpredictmaintenanceissues.Itisalso workingwithinsurancecompaniestodevelop systemsfor”usage-basedinsurance”that personalizepremiumsbasedondriverbehavior. http://www.teraki.com PRODUCTIVITY ZAPIENS SPAIN WHATITDOES:UsesAItocreateacentralized knowledgemanagementsystemforcompaniesthat allowsemployeestosharedataresources.Asthey shareinformation,theplatformalsobuildsprofilesof employeestohelpmatchthemtovariousjobsor tasksthatariseelsewhereinanorganization. www.zapiens.org COMPUTING COGNIFIBER ISRAEL WHATITDOES:CogniFiberisdeveloping”scalable photoniccomputing,”anewtechnologythatallows machinelearningandAItobeprocessedinfiber cablesratherthanhavingtogoallthewaybacktoa centralcomputingsources.Theconceptaimsto speedprocessing,cutcosts,andsaveenergy. http://www.cognifiber.com/ VIRTUALREALITY NEURODIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES SPAIN WHATITDOES:Develops virtual reality hardware and software, including haptic gloves, for mobile phones and computers. Clients include NASA, the U.S. Navy, Airbus, Alstom, BMW, British Telecom and Vodafone. www.neurodigital.es IOT DEVICEHUB ROMANIA WHATITDOES:Operates a platform and marketplace for IoT devices and systems. Its open- source tools are designed to make it easier for businesses to connect and manage IoT technologies. https://www.devicehub.net/ ENERGY HYBRICO ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES GUATEMALA WHATITDOES:Allowscompaniestopowertheir mission-criticaloperationsusingsustainable,green powersources.Itsmodular,solar-powered generationsystemcanalsobeusedtodeliverpower toremoteareasnotconnectedtothepowergrid. http://www.hybricoenergy.com ENERGY AEINNOVA SPAIN WHATITDOES:To reduce wasted energy, AEinnova creates power by using heat generated by electronic and industrial machines. This captured and recycled energy can then be used for low-powered IoT devices. http://www.aeinnova.com DRONES UNMANNED LIFE UNITEDKINGDOM WHATITDOES:The company has built an IoT platform to manage both flying and earthbound drones by allowing them to operate autono- mously. The system works over a variety of wireless networks and initially is targeting large industrial users who want to augment their production systems. http://unmanned.life Compiled and written by Chris O’Brien. O’Brien is European c orrespondent for VentureBeat, currently based in France. Before moving to France in 2014, he spent 15 years covering Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News and Los Angeles Times. ARTIFICIALINTELLIGENCE DIGITALGENIUS UNITEDKINGDOM WHATITDOES:Applies deep learning and artificial intelligence to the customer service opérations of large companies. Customers include KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. www.digitalgenius.com ARTIFICIALINTELLIGENCE PIXONEYE ISRAEL WHATITDOES:Pixoneyeusescomputervisionand AItohelpbusinessesmeasurecustomerbehavior. Onceitssoftwaredevelopmentkitispluggedintoa company’sconsumerappitscanstheusers’photos toenhanceabusiness’sprofileofcustomersand predicttheirbehavior. http://www.pixoneye.com LOCATIONSERVICES GIPSTECH ITALY WHATITDOES:Thecompany’ssystemcombines twotechnologiesitdeveloped—geomagnetic sensorsandaspecializedlocalizationengineto sensethedirectionofpedestrians–withpublic technologieslikeWi-FiandBluetoothbeacons.The platformallowsprecisemappingandtrackingof indoorspacessuchasmuseumsandairports. http://www.gipstech.com/ SMARTCITIES XAPIX GERMANY WHATITDOES:Uses open data to create smart-city services. It’s currently focused on solving the challenge of helping auto manufacturers make better use of connected car data and linking to urban mobility systems. https://www.xapix.io
  • 28. P.26 — THE INNOVATOR Sometime last November an anonymous group of hackers began hijacking smartphones and redirecting their browsers to a website that conducts “crypto-mining,” the term for using computing power to tally transactions made on the blockchain, a type of digital ledger technology. By the time cybersecurity firm Malwarebytes detected the campaign against Android phones in late January, it estimated that millions of phones had been compromised. “The threat landscape has changed dramatically over the past few months, with many actors jumping on the cryptocurrency bandwagon,” Malwarebytes researchers wrote in a report. “Malware-based miners, as well as their web-based counterparts, are booming and offering online criminals new revenue sources. Forced crypto-mining is now also affecting mobile phones and tablets en masse.” Rather than attempting to infiltrate inside a mobile phone user’s network to steal information, forced crypto-mining makes use of 100% of the processing power of each compromised phone to make money for the hackers. (As payment for their mining or processing services, miners are paid cryptocurrency as fees.) It is just the latest example of how the long- feared security risks posed by gadgets such as smartphones and tablets have finally become a reality. Over the past two years, the number of malware attacks and vulnerabilities on mobile devices have exploded, leading 4YFN, an innovation conference taking place in Barcelona at the same time as Mobile World Congress, to put cyber-security on the agenda for the first time. While innovative technologies, startups, and strategies Cybercrime IsGoingMobile — Innovative startups are helping corporates combat security risks posed by smartphones and tablets. By Chris O’Brien CYBERSECURITY are emerging mobile offers too many entry points to prevent the bad guys from getting in. The goal now is to use deceit and vigilance to isolate the hackers’ movements and limit the damage. “Companies use to think of security as putting up walls and creating a fortress” to prevent anyone from getting in, says Nico Goulet, a scheduled speaker on the February 27th 4YFN cyber-security panel and a partner at Madrid-based Adara Ventures, which focuses on cyber-security and Big Data investing. “Now you assume the world is more open and the walls are not going to protect us. Now you have to assume people are going to get in.” Mobile as the Target Of course, mobile and the Internet of the Things are extensions of existing corporate networks, which are facing a growing wave of attacks on all fronts. JuniperResearch,ananalystfirm,recentlypredictedthattherapiddigitization of consumers’ lives and enterprise records will increase the cost of data breaches to $2.1 trillion globally by 2019. An increasingly connected world where more information is digitized and storedonlinehasdramaticallyincreasedthevalueoftargets,offeringtantalizing opportunitiesforincreasinglywell-fundedinternationaldigitalcrimesyndicates and state-sponsored hacking. There’s been a non-stop parade of headline- grabbing breaches over the past year, from ransomware cyberattacks such as WannaCry and NotPetya to the catastrophic Equifax hack. As a result, spending on cybersecurity is exploding. IDC projects that the $83.5 billion spent worldwide on security hardware, software and services in 2017 will climb to $119.9 billion by 2021. Even as cyber-security spending overall increases, a report from Thales and research firm 451 notes that mobile will be a particular focus of this investment, with 57% of organizations it surveyed saying they planned to spend more on end point and mobile defensein2018.That’sbecauseoverthepasttwoyears,mobilehasincreasingly become the focus of attacks. While security experts have fretted about this possibility since the iPhone ushered in the smartphone age more than a decade ago, it’s only more recently that the ubiquity of phones and tablets atworkhavemadethemvaluableenoughtodrawmoresubstantialinvestment and attention from hackers. The lack of security on the devices combined with the growing amounts of data they contain make them much easier access points. “The evolution of the mobile device into a computing device, I would say it’s something organizations didn’t put high on their radar for a long time,” says Robert Arandjelovic, director of security strategy at Symantec, a U.S.- based global cyber-security software company. “And security is still an unpopular topic. Because people still look at security as a weight that will pull you back rather than something that will allow you do these things.” In an annual security report, Kaspersky, a Moscow-based cyber security
  • 29. and antivirus software company, notes that during the first half of 2017 it detected almost twice as much ransomware on smartphones as it did for all of 2016. Hackers tend to target Android phones because its open source code and the Google Play stores make development and distribution of apps containing some kind of malware more efficient. CVE Details, which compiles a database of security issues, received reports of 842 Android vulnerabilities in 2017, up from 523 the previous year and only 13 in 2014. “Google has been playing catch up to improve the security posture of apps available within their store,” says Pablo Garcia, CEO of Japanese security firm FFRI, which has developed a mobile malware detection product. “Google removed roughly 700,000 malicious apps from their app store in 2017.” But Apple’s iOS is not completely immune. CVE Details lists 387 iOS vulnerabilities reported in 2017, up from 161 in 2016. An Uptick in Vulnerabilities Trend Micro, which specializes in enterprise data security and cyber security solutions for businesses, was one of the earliest to move into mobile security. In 2012, the company released its Trend Micro Mobile App Reputation Service, which scans publicly available apps for suspicious behavior and malware across all app marketplaces. When employees at big corporates first started using their personal devices at work, IT managers kept a pretty tight lid on access, says Loïc Guézo, Trend Micro’s cybersecurity — P.27 CYBERSECURITY STARTUPS TOWATCH WISEKEY SWITZERLAND WHAT IT DOES : Authentication, identity management and cybersecu- rity for the Internet of Things. www.wisekey.com strategist for Southern Europe. But as the practice has become more common, those devices have become more integral, and thus more enticing to digital thieves. “There’s more data on these phones and there are more privileged access points they can use to get into the corporate network,” says Guézo, So it is no surprise that cyber-security startups which are driving some of the more innovative approaches to mobile security, are in hot demand. For instance, Fireglass, an Israeli startup, founded in 2014 raised $20 million for its pioneering security strategy known as “isolation.” The company’s technology creates virtual versions of corporate functions that
  • 30. employees can access on mobile browsers without being connected to the main corporate network. If someone hacks their phone, it can’t be used asagatewayintothemainsystem.Symantec,aU.S.-basedglobalcybersecurity company, acquired Fireglass in July 2017 for an undisclosed sum. Five days later, Symantec acquired another Israeli security start up called Skycure, which had raised $27.5 million in venture capital. Skycure created a platform that combined crowd-sourced threat information and artificial intelligence in an attempt to predict and prevent attacks on mobile devices. After the acquisition, Skycure was renamed Symantec Endpoint Protection Mobile. CounterCraft, a Spanish security startup founded in 2015 that has raised $2.6 million, sets various traps inside networks for hackers who break in, using another strategy called “deception,” which assumes hackers will find awaytobreak-in.Theseincludevariousappsthatareplacedonasmartphone or tablet that the owner knows not to touch or launch. But if someone steals the phone, or breaks in, and tries to launch or access one of these apps, they can release fake information, or do things like activate the phones’ camera to snap a picture of the thief, or send out GPS coordinates, or turn on the microphone. “You have to be one step ahead of any threats, and we try to use concepts from counter intelligence,” says David Barroso, co-founder and CEO of CounterCraft, a scheduled participant on the 4YFN conferencecybersecuritypanel.Still,theassumptionremainsthatinformation will be stolen. Increasingly, that information is being used for things like accessing accounts, particularly financial accounts. The stolen data is used to create fake identities that mix information from various victims to create new personas that are then used to open fraudulent accounts. Enter 4iQ, a startup launched in 2016 with a service that tracks the use of stolen personal identities that are traded on what is known as the “Dark Web.” The company was founded by the Spanish developer Julio Casal, who previously launched another pioneering cybersecurity startup called AlienVault. That company, which was launched in 2007, was backed by Adara, as is 4iQ, which has raised $14 million. 4iQ CEO Monica Pal, who previously worked with Casal at AlienVault, says the mobile topography is only going to get more challenging for companies as employees turn to new gadgets and the lines between personal and business uses and applications blur. “The new perimeter is the individual,” Pal says. “And the way the individual gets online is their mobile device.” CROWDSTRIKE UNITEDSTATES WHAT IT DOES : Analyzesendpoint eventsinrealtimeusingmachine learningandhumanintelligence.Itaims to detectactiveattacksatendpoints anddisableattacksbeforeanetwork break-inoccurs. https://www.crowdstrike.com/ SECURITHINGS ISRAEL WHATITDOES: Provides a platform that lets service providers monitor all activity across IoT devices in real time to detect threats. https://securithings.com/ TANIUM UNITEDSTATES WHATITDOES: Provides a dashboard that gives visibility and control over every device in a corporate network, with the aim of detecting any security issues within 15 seconds. https://www.tanium.com/ CYBEREASON UNITEDSTATES WHATITDOES: Endpoint detection of attacks. Its technology finds a weakness in the attack and then designs a specific response to stop it. https://www.cybereason.com/ P.28 — THE INNOVATOR CYBERSECURITY Financial services Utilities and energy Aerospace and defense Technology and software Healthcare Services Industrial/manufacturing Retail Public sector Transportation Consumer products Communications Life science Education Hospitality Sources: Ponemon Institute and Accenture Average annualized cost by industry sector US$ millions Total annualized cost ($1 million omitted) FINANCIAL SERVICES HAS THE HIGHEST COST OF CYBERCRIME $0 4 8 12 16 20
  • 32. AnInterview With JulienCodorniou, Vice-PresidentofWorkplacebyFacebook more than one million work groups. Usersincludeglobalphonecompanies like Telenor, Spotify, Telefonica, Deliveroo and India’s Airtel. The Innovator’s editor-in-chief recently interviewed Julien Codorniou, vice- president of Workplace by Facebook, about how its mobile-first enterprise collaboration platform is changing the way people work. When did Facebook launch Workplace and why? J.C.: Workplace launched in October Facebook,anexhibitor atMobileWorldCongressinBarcelona Feb. 28-March 1, is aggressively expanding into the market for enterprise social networking and collaboration applications through Workplace by Facebook. This collaboration tool allows co-workers to communicate and share project- related messages, documents, videos andothercontentoverawebinterface or mobile app. Workplace now serves more than 30,000 corporations and organizations, which have formed of 2016, so less than 18 months ago. It is based on a system that we built for ourselves and used internally for many years. A few companies asked us if they could use it so we granted them access and then based on that success we decided to package it and launch it officially. The vision is that it is possible to change the way companies work by connecting everyone from the CEO down to the people on the front lines that were never connected before – people who never had a desk, a company email or a computer. Every CEO we meet tells us that everybody in the next generation is coming to work with different expectations about how to communicate so we knew that if we could increase connectivity via our platform – which uses an interface most people are already familiar with –wecouldincreaseproductivity,boost employee engagement and help retention. So is Workplace more of a communications tool or a collaboration tool? J.C.: It’s both. It is a communications platform and it is an automation platform. Workplace connects with industry business tools, along with custom integrations like bots, to help businesses get more done. It’s a crowded market – what does Facebook offer that other services like Microsoft’s Yammer or IBM Connections don’t? Workplace’s functionality also overlaps that of team collaboration tools such as Slack, Microsoft Teams and Atlassian Stride. What do you see as your key differentiators? J.C.: The fact that nearly two billion people know how to use Facebook means that they also know how to use Workplace. This means that no training is needed for employees, which is important for non-technical populations.Workplace,likeFacebook, is also mobile-first, so it’s built for the way people work now. We believe that Workplace is a product that every company – regardless of size, industry and geography – can use and benefit from. For big companies we have developed an ecosystem of partners to help with onboarding that includes Deloitte, Slalom and PwC, because even if technical training is not necessary, giving everyone in the company a voice can sometimes necessitatesomechangemanagement. The fact that we connect to other applications that many companies use, like Box, Microsoft Office, ServiceNow, Okta and G-Suite, really resonates as well. Our pricing is also a plus. Companies pay $3 per active user per month – if someone is not using it the company does not pay – and there are no long-term contracts. We are also adding features all the time to make Workplace better and faster. All of these things together explain our traction in the marketplace. We more than doubled the number of Workplace users last year. Can you give us some examples of how companies are using Workplace? J.C.: Our customers include Starbucks, Walmart, Heineken, AirAsia, Booking. com, Spotify and telecom operators like Telenor. More than 75% of employees at Telenor are using P.30— THE INNOVATOR FUTURE OF WORK NewWays OfCollaborating AtWork
  • 33. devices, but it works for people like CEOs or managers, who use their mobilestoaccessitbetweenmeetings. What about some of the young high-growth companies that are using your service, like Spotify? What are the advantages of using Workplace for them? J.C.: The platform is helpful for companies that are trying to scale their culture and rapidly integrate new employees. What about the SME market ? J.C.: We are starting to address the the minute they wake up in the morning to go to discover content, communicate and get things done. It soon becomes the home page of the company. Do most people access Workplace through their computers or via mobile phones? J.C.: The vast majority use Workplace ontheirmobile.Manyoftheemployees connected at companies like Walmart, Danone, Heineken previously didn’t have email addresses. Now, these employees use Workplace on mobile Workplace by Facebook on a weekly basis. It has already replaced most internal emails and the company newsletter. Now teams within the company, like marketing, are using small groups, chat and video calling, to get things done. Equally, it works for large groups – the CEO of Telenor uses Workplace to do live sessions, in HD, on his mobile phone to communicate with everyone in the company,whichhaseffectivelyreplaced the company’s intranet. Workplace is the platform that people use from SME market now, making it easier than ever before for them to sign up and get up and running quickly. We decided to first go after large corporate customers because it is easier to branch out from big corporates to startups and SMEs than the other way around. Q: Is Workplace evolving from being a platform to a kind of ecosystem? JC: We are seeing a lot of startups building apps on top of Workplace. One is called Safety Officer, by Service Rocket, which is a safety check app that helps a company determine quickly who is safe and who is not in times of crisis. Since the entire company is on the same platform it makes it easy to reach everyone quickly. Other startups are creating Workplace bots for things like inventory management, shift management or to do employee surveys. I foresee a growing quantity and diversity of bots on Workplace that will be built by other companies and not by us. Facebook has been receiving a lot of negative press recently for its role in spreading fake news, creating questions around abuse and trust. Is this an issue for Workplace customers? J.C.: Workplace is a software-as-a- service startup that is completely separate from consumer Facebook. When a company uses Workplace, it is that company that owns, and administers the account data, not us or Facebook. This allows the company to control and monitor what appears in their News Feed and across Workplace for their employees. — P.31 “Morethan75%ofemployeesatTelenorareusing WorkplacebyFacebookonaweekly basis.Ithasalreadyreplacedmostinternalemails andthecompanynewsletter.”
  • 34. P.32— THE INNOVATOR AR/VR BusinessesAre PuttingVirtualReality ToWork— The technology is being applied to everything from aviation to auto manufacturing By Leila Abboud It’s easy to dismiss virtual reality as a fad that appeals only to couch-bound video-game aficionados. After all, people do look a bit silly with clunky goggles strapped to their faces. Yet businesses are proving to be fast adopters of the technology, which will once again be on display at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. From aviation to construction, companies are putting virtual reality (VR) to work with the aim of reaping efficiency and productivity gains. Forrester Research predicts that starting this year, businesses will buy more mid- priced virtual reality gear than consumers. Augmented reality (AR), which layers virtual 3D images on top of what a person sees in the real world, is also turning out to be particularly well suited for the workplace. Since it doesn’t distract users in immersive environments, they can carry on conversations and use their hands naturally. Microsoft is among the biggest boosters of augmented reality for businesses. Its HoloLens glasses went on the market in March 2016 and are now sold in 39 countries. Other manufacturers include start-ups like the U.S.-based DAQRI. It’s a much less crowded field than on the consumer side of the VR business, where Facebook, Samsung, HTC and others are jockeying for position. The market researcher IDC forecasts that sales of AR and VR headsets will grow from about 10 million units in 2016 to 100 million in 2021. A Need for Speed While AR/VR technology is still nascent, the most innovative companies in their respective sectors, such as Airbus and Ford Motor Co., have already completed pilot projects and are starting wider deployments. Florent Pelissier, the product lead in France for Microsoft’s HoloLens, believes that businesses need to move quickly. “If you’re in an industrial or manufacturing sector and you have not yet started using or at least experimenting with mixed reality, then you are falling behind,” he says. So what should executives be doing to ensure that doesn’t happen? First off, companies need to think about how AR/VR can actually help solve business problems. There is no point deploying a big virtual reality project if it doesn’t lower costs, reduce time to make a product, or make workers perform better. To that end, companies should define key metrics to measure the impact of the technology. That way, executives will be armed with data with which to decide if broader use is warranted. Although costs for AR/VR gear have been dropping, projects remain expensive and time-consuming to implement. Companies often have to bring in specialized developers or outside consultants to write software for them since there are few off-the-shelf programs available. Even though most AR/VR headsets come with some software, making them work with the IT systems of a company or perform specific tasks usually requires custom-built programs. This will eventually change as more software emerges, but for now deploying AR/VR projects can be a slog. Startups, such as Immersion and Diota in France or Re’Flekt in Germany, are helping big companies implement AR and VR, as are big IT firms like Accenture and Capgemini. Industrial Applications It is easier for companies that are already accustomed to working with 3D images on computers to jump into AR/VR. Think of a car company designing a new sedan or an architect working on a new office tower. Both would already be using computer-aided design software to manipulate 3D images. It’s a natural evolution for them to create virtual reality versions of the designs, which can then speed up the prototyping and building process. Airbus, for example, has been a leader in using virtual reality in its design process. While conceiving a new helicopter, the company had four so- called virtual reality immersion rooms installed at the various production sites involved in the project. This allowed the engineers to collaborate more easily, using 3D models of the aircraft. AR/VR tools help make Airbus staffers more efficient, says Christophe Chartier, the CEO of the French virtual reality company Immersion, which has done work for Airbus. “While designing the cockpit for the passenger jet A380, the virtual reality rooms were so lifelike that Airbus staffers