The technocrats and communications with other generations in the workplace

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This slide show is about the different generations and their communication issues with the technocrats. I made each slide move like a tabbed folder in the animations.

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  • GIVE EXAMPLES OF PROBLEMS IN WORKSPACE
  • Below are several common characteristics of the Baby Boomer generation.Work-Centric: Baby Boomers are extremely hardworking and motivated by position, perks and prestige. Baby Boomers relish long work weeks and define themselves by their professional accomplishments. Since they sacrificed a great deal to get where they are in their career, this workaholic generation believes that Generation X and Generation Y should pay their dues and conform to a culture of overwork. Baby Boomers may criticize younger generations for a lack of work ethic and commitment to the workplace.Independent: Baby Boomers are confident, independent and self-reliant. This generation grew up in an era of reform and believe they can change the world. They questioned established authority systems and challenged the status quo. In the legal workplace, Baby Boomers are not afraid of confrontation and will not hesitate to challenge established practices.Goal-Oriented: With increased educational and financial opportunities than previous generations, Baby Boomers are achievement-oriented, dedicated and career-focused. They welcome exciting, challenging projects and strive to make a difference.Competitive: Since Baby Boomers equate work and position with self-worth, they are quite competitive in the workplace. They are clever, resourceful and strive to win. Boomers believe in hierarchal structure and rankism and may have a hard time adjusting to workplace flexibility trends. They believe in "face time" at the office and may fault younger generations for working remotely.
  • Sandwich because many take care of both children and again parents
  • Below are several common characteristics of the Baby Boomer generation.Work-Centric: Baby Boomers are extremely hardworking and motivated by position, perks and prestige. Baby Boomers relish long work weeks and define themselves by their professional accomplishments. Since they sacrificed a great deal to get where they are in their career, this workaholic generation believes that Generation X and Generation Y should pay their dues and conform to a culture of overwork. Baby Boomers may criticize younger generations for a lack of work ethic and commitment to the workplace.Independent: Baby Boomers are confident, independent and self-reliant. This generation grew up in an era of reform and believe they can change the world. They questioned established authority systems and challenged the status quo. In the legal workplace, Baby Boomers are not afraid of confrontation and will not hesitate to challenge established practices.Goal-Oriented: With increased educational and financial opportunities than previous generations, Baby Boomers are achievement-oriented, dedicated and career-focused. They welcome exciting, challenging projects and strive to make a difference.Competitive: Since Baby Boomers equate work and position with self-worth, they are quite competitive in the workplace. They are clever, resourceful and strive to win. Boomers believe in hierarchal structure and rankism and may have a hard time adjusting to workplace flexibility trends. They believe in "face time" at the office and may fault younger generations for working remotely.
  • Here are some of the characteristics identified for Generation Y:Closer relationship with parents. Admiration for their parents (33% names one or both parents as their hero, rather than a pop culture celebrity). A closer sphere of influence - a more dangerous world has created an environment which is more sheltered and structured, and where young people have been protected. The small sphere of influence has contributed to the creation of a generation that is, in general, more polite and considerate than their predecessors. They are less likely to call adults by their first names, but rather use the more formal Mr. or Mrs. Attentive and respectful. This generation has been brought up to show respect for others. In a crowded world where there are larger numbers of people in classroom and activities, civility becomes essential to getting along. Programmed and team oriented. Some college administrators believe that many Gen Y's have "lost the sense of pure play." They expect everything to be planned for them and do not expect to have as much freedom - or responsibility for structuring their educational lives. Having spent a large percentage of time in structured activities, they are accustomed to having a lot of adult supervision. Thus, they may have poor conflict resolution skills. Pressured to succeed. The Boomers, parents of the Gen Y generation, pressured themselves to succeed and also transferred that pressure to their children. In addition, just as Boomers have lived in a world where there is increasing competition for resources, Gen Y has done the same. Involved. This is a generation of activists - young people who believe they can make a difference. Egalitarian. This cohort often prefers to work in teams or groups. They definitely do not prefer hierarchy. Sometimes faculty finds the lack of authoritarian hierarchy in their groups creates ambiguity when it comes to having a point of contact for information. Open and eager. Member of Gen Y are very open and eager. Student are responsive and "very smart" according to some faculty. Demanding of themselves and others. Members of this cohort set the bar high for themselves and they, like their Boomer parents, expect success. They sometimes "expect" to get good grades and are upset when this does not happen. Stressed. Compared with five years ago, 81% of college mental health service directors reported an increase in students with serious psychological problems. Pressure to succeed is one reason identified by some counselors. Multi-taskers. This generation can easily manage to listen to music, work on the computer and watch television at the same time. This means they need a lot of stimulation in their learning environments and may be more focused than it seems to their teachers. Socially conscious. There has been a resurgence of interest in politics and social issues. Administrators at Colgate University reported that 70% of first-year students came to campus already registered to vote. Some 93% indicated that they voted in the 2004 presidential election.
  • Want to know how what they do fits into the big picture and need to understand how everything fits together- want to effect change and make an impact View their work as an expression of themselves; not as a definition of themselvesExceptional Multi-Taskers- need more than one activity happening at a timeSeek active versus passive involvementLess likely to seek managerial or team leadership positions that would compromise life outside of work
  • Generation Y, born between 1976-1995 or 1988-2001 depending on the source, is vastly different from previous generations - especially Boomers. Members of Gen Y cut their teeth on computer keyboards, and to them, computer technology and the Internet are as natural as breathing. This generation's members know more about digital technology than their parents or teachers, and this promises to change not only the way families interact and communicate, but also how young people relate to school and learning. Generation Y combines the can-do attitude of Veterans, the teamwork ethic of Boomers and the technological savvy of Generation X. For this group, the preferred learning environment combines teamwork and technology. In a classroom with lots of Gen Y's, give everyone a task. When a few have completed it, encourage them to walk around the room and help others. They're used to working this way in school. Generation Y is the most diverse generation in history. Members are born to the most diverse mix of parents in history as well - from teenagers to middle-aged moms who postponed childbearing to establish a career - from Boomers to Xers. One third of this generation was born to single, unwed mothers. This generation is less white and more brown than any generation in our history, too.
  • Traditionalists: “Build a Legacy”Baby Boomers: “ Build a Stellar Career”Generation Xers: “Build a Portable Career”Millennials: “Build Parallel Careers”
  • • Younger managers and staff may view Traditionalists as being dictatorial, narrow, rigid, techno-illiterate and slow to adapt to the speed of business. • Traditionalists might misinterpret dry humor or sarcasm since they prefer open, direct and honest communication. • Respecting authority, they tend to prefer the straightforward, ‘tell-me-what-you-need-me-to-do’ supervisor approach. •
  • Their resulting non-participation or confrontation may be viewed as crabbiness. Traditionalists tend to be highly offended with uninhibited workplace banter, with younger generations freely expressing most anything including issues that are personal and sensitive. • Traditionalists despise workers who jump ladder rungs on way to a promotion.
  • Traditionalists might view emails, voicemails, pagers and other informal means of communication as lazy & impersonal. Their focus on one task at a time, might lead people of other generations to view them as incompetent and unable to multi-task.
  • Younger managers and staff might see Boomers’ long hours as evidence that they have an unhealthy work/life balance. • In organizations in which telecommuting is possible, X’ers might misinterpret Boomers’ demands for employees to stay on-site as limited confidence in their work or decreased trust.
  • • Employees of previous generations may experience a bias against having a supervisor that is the same age as their own kids. • Previous generations might resent an X’er who is in a management position if he/she hasn’t used the corporate ladder or ‘paid their dues.’ Meanwhile, the X’er might have confidence in knowing that they secured their position by being the most competent candidate based on skill, knowledge, and abilities. • X’ers might lose interest in meetings where non-critical information could’ve been shared in more expedient ways (email, overhead announcements).
  • Likewise, they might withdraw from team meetings where a decision seems painfully obvious. Their disinterest might be perceived as a failure to get-along with coworkers or be a team player. As a result of their independence, X’ers may need to be reminded to delegate. Failure to delegate might lead other generations to feel underappreciated and/or unwelcome. • X’ers’ off-site contributions to an organization might go unrecognized. Examples include taking work home, doing independent research and social networking.
  • • Those not comfortable with technology might perceive the Y’er’s PowerPoint presentation and Excel graphing as attempts to ‘show-off.’ • Y’ers might assume fellow employees share the same technological skills in the workplace. When helping an older coworker, they may jump ahead several sequences; “It’s easy--all you have to do is modify your settings so that you allow keychain encryption.”
  • Y’ers find letters, pagers, faxes, answering machines and email communication as too slow. Requisitions for wireless and/or immediate communication technologies may be disregarded by an employee of a previous generation. • Y’ers multi-tasking abilities can become evident in an instance when they are searching the Internet, listening to a conference call and talking to a fellow staff person simultaneously. To the Y’er, this multi-tasking is second nature. Previous generations tend to see this as blatantly rude and insulting.
  • As children from non-traditional families with friends from all walks of life, training Y’ers on mandatory workplace ‘Diversity Awareness’ might be stating the obvious. To maximize real-time communication within limited screen space (e.g. text messaging on cell phone screens), Y’ers are using a new form of shorthand. BRB (Be Right Back) and LOL (Laughing Out Loud) are two examples. This shorthand also may be used on Post-ItTMnotes and emails to members of other generations. Older staff might view this shorthand as cryptic, unnecessary and exclusionary. (What in the heck is BRB?’…)
  • • Feeling Valued by Peers, Supervisor(s) and the OrganizationInclusion in the Communication LoopPeople like to be included. They like to give and receive constructive feedback. People want to know that they are contributing to the organization’s mission and are partly responsible for the success.
  • Managers may send out email announcements, but older employees may only check it once a day whereas younger employees may check it every fifteen minutes.The need to be involved in relevant communication transcends generations. All employees want to receive clear communication about their work environment and employers’ expectations, preferably in the style the employee values.As an aside, we wonder whether the ever-present organizational complaint related to ‘poor communication’ really suggests that employees believe that they are not being provided with communication in the style (mode and frequency) they prefer.
  • Work/Life BalanceRewards, Benefits and CompensationLife-Long Learning OpportunitiesAlthough staff may prefer different methods of learning, people of all generations value learning things that will help them personally or on the job (e.g. Certifications, Formal Continuing Education). Learning opportunities need to be available to all employees. This reinforces intergenerational contribution and organizational commitment to all employees.
  • The technocrats and communications with other generations in the workplace

    1. 1. The Technocrats & Multigenerational CommunicationsPRESENTED BY: Beth Petrunich, Nichole Robinson, Robin McLaren
    2. 2. WHAT IS A GENERATION?HOW DOES IT MATTER IN THE WORKPLACE?
    3. 3. Examination of Generations• Historical Events of Youth Bond them Together• Common Events influence Attitudes Behaviors, and Expectations• A Group Traveling Together through Time
    4. 4. DEDICATION LEADS TO REWARDSCOMMITTED SELF-SACRIFICE
    5. 5. Greatest Generation• AKA: Traditionalists, Matures, the Silent Generation, and Veterans, Loyalists• Born: between 1925 and 1946 (McShane & Von Glinow, 2010)• Experienced: the Great Depression, Pearl Harbor, and the World War II, GI Bill
    6. 6. Workplace Values• Loyalty• Recognition• Self-Sacrifice• Traditional Values and Gender Roles• Resistance to change• Past-oriented
    7. 7. Work Styles• Consistency and uniformity• Seek out technological advances• Command and control leadership reminiscent of military operations• Prefer hierarchical organizational structures and will continue to view horizontal structure in a hierarchical way
    8. 8. Greatest Generation’s Tag LineHARD WORK AND EFFORTWILL LEAD TO SUCCESS
    9. 9. DISTRUST AUTHORITY WORK-CENTRIC FACE-TIME COMPETITIVE
    10. 10. Baby Boomers• AKA: Sandwich Generation, The ―Me‖ Generation• Born: 1946 and 1964• Experienced: the Women‘s Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, and the moon landing.• Witnessed: the assassinations of JFK, Martin Luther, the resignation of President Nixon, and the Vietnam War.
    11. 11. Workplace Values• Dedication• Face Time• Place a high value on Independent Thinking• Confidence in tasks• Emphasize team building• Seek collaborative, group decision making• Avoid conflict
    12. 12. Baby Boomer’s Tag LineLIVE TO WORK
    13. 13. VALUE WORK/LIFE BALANCE Flexible TECHNOLOGICALLY ADEPT INFORMAL AUTONOMY
    14. 14. Generation X• AKA: The Slacker Generation and Baby Bust (Fogg, 2008)• Born: 1965 to 1979 (McShane & Von Glinow, 2010)• Experienced: High Divorce Rates, Latchkey, Berlin Wall, Challenger disaster, Rapid Change
    15. 15. Workplace Values• Highly Mobile• Loyal to work groups and bosses (not firms)• Dislike Hierarchy• Rewards should be based on merit not seniority• Prefer to work alone with informal work arrangements
    16. 16. Work Styles• High-quality end results• Productivity• Balance between work and life- work to live not live to work• Flexible work hours/ job sharing appealing• Free agents• See self as a marketing commodity• Comfortable with authority but not impressed with titles
    17. 17. Gen X Tag LineWORK TO LIVE
    18. 18. INFLUENCERS LAZY HIGHLY CONNECTED THE FUTUREWHO THEY ARE SELF-CENTERED NOW – FOR EVERYTHING! TREND-SETTERS SPOILED / CODDLED AMBITIOUS DIGITAL NATIVES, NOT IMMIGRANTS
    19. 19. Source: 2008 Brand Mercenaries, LLC :: Colorado-based Generation Y Experts
    20. 20. Generation Y• AKA: Millennials (Fogg, 2008) Technocrats, Echo Boomers, iGeneration, Internet Generation, or Net Generation• Born: 1980 to 2002 (McShane & Von Glinow, 2010) 3x as many as Gen X• Experienced: Internet Era, 9/11/2001, Columbine Massacre, Facebook, Cell Phones
    21. 21. Workplace Values• Everybody Wins!• Feedback• Recognition• Fulfillment• Advanced Technology• Fun• Constant Flow of Information• Egalitarian
    22. 22. Work Styles• Want to know the big picture• View their work as an expression of themselves; not as a definition of themselves• Exceptional Multi-Taskers• Seek active involvement• Less likely to seek managerial or team leadership positions that would compromise life outside of work
    23. 23. Millennials Tag LineTELECOMMUTINGPRODUCTIVITY ≠ HOURS AT DESK
    24. 24. WHAT HAPPENS INCROSS GENERATIONALCOMMUNICATION
    25. 25. What Happens if these Generations Fail to Communicate?• Turnover rates may increase• Intangible HR costs may increase• — Morale may suffer• — Grievances and complaints may increase• — Perceptions of fairness and equity may suffer
    26. 26. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Traditionalist• Younger managers and staff may view Traditionalists as being dictatorial, narrow, rigid, techno-illiterate and slow• Traditionalists might misinterpret dry humor or sarcasm since they prefer direct communication.• Respecting authority, they prefer the straightforward, ‗tell-me-what-you-need-me-to-do‘ supervisor approach.
    27. 27. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Traditionalist• Traditionalists tend to be highly offended with uninhibited workplace banter• Traditionalists despise workers who jump ladder rungs on a way up to a promotion.
    28. 28. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Traditionalist• Traditionalists might view emails, voicemails, pagers and other informal means of communication as lazy & impersonal.• Their focus on one task at a time, might lead people of other generations to view them as incompetent and unable to multi-task.
    29. 29. Potential for IntergenerationalMisunderstanding of the Boomer:• Boomers‘ long hours is evidence that they have an unhealthy work/life balance.• In organizations in which telecommuting is possible, X‘ers might misinterpret Boomers‘ demands for employees to stay on-site as limited confidence in their work or decreased trust.
    30. 30. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Boomer:• Boomers might believe that employees who fail to put in ‗extra time‘ lack commitment, focus, and loyalty.(Consider the implications for a performance rating and doling of pay raise).• Boomers might not recognize or fully appreciate the off-site contribution of employees(such as grading tests at home for teachers, etc.). “If your car isn’t in the parking lot, you must not be working…”
    31. 31. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the X’er:• Employees of previous generations may experience a bias against having a supervisor that is the same age as their own kids.• Previous generations might resent an X‘er who is in a management position if he/she hasn‘t used the corporate ladder or ‗paid their dues.‘• X‘ers might lose interest in meetings where non-critical information could‘ve been shared in more expedient ways (email, overhead announcements).
    32. 32. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the X’er:• Their disinterest might be perceived as a failure to get- along with coworkers or be a team player.• As a result of their independence, X‘ers may need to be reminded to delegate.• X‘ers‘ off-site contributions to an organization might go unrecognized.
    33. 33. Potential for IntergenerationalMisunderstanding of the Y’er:• Those not comfortable with technology might perceive the Y’er’s PowerPoint presentation and Excel graphing as attempts to ‘show- off.’• Y‘ers might assume fellow employees share the same technological skills in the workplace.“It’s easy--all you have to do is modify your settings so that you allow keychain encryption.”
    34. 34. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Y’er:• Y‘ers find letters, pagers, faxes, answering machines and email communication as too slow.• To the Y‘er, multi-tasking is second nature. Previous generations tend to see this as blatantly rude and insulting.
    35. 35. Potential for Intergenerational Misunderstanding of the Y’er:• ‗Diversity Awareness‘ might be stating the obvious.• Y‘ers are using a new form of shorthand. BRB (Be Right Back) and LOL (Laughing Out Loud) are two examples. This shorthand also may be used on Post-ItTM notes and emails to members of other generations. – Older staff might view this shorthand as cryptic, unnecessary and exclusionary. (What in the heck is BRB?’…)
    36. 36. Where is the common ground?TRENDS SHARED BY ALLGENERATIONS
    37. 37. Values Shared• Feeling Valued by Peers, Supervisor(s) and the Organization• Inclusion in the Communication Loop• People like to be included.
    38. 38. Values Shared• All employees want to receive clear communication about their work environment and employers‘ expectations, preferably in the style the employee values.• As an aside, we wonder whether the ever-present organizational complaint related to ‗poor communication‘ really suggests that employees believe that they are not being provided with communication in the style (mode and frequency) they prefer.
    39. 39. Values Shared• Work/Life Balance• Rewards, Benefits and Compensation• Life-Long Learning Opportunities• Although staff may prefer different methods of learning, people of all generations value learning things that will help them personally or on the job.• Learning opportunities need to be available to all employees.
    40. 40. How does an Organization Traverse the Generation‘sCommunication Divide?BUILDING COMMUNICATION BRIDGES
    41. 41. Alternatives
    42. 42. Alternativesface to face, phone, fax, email, texting, teleconferencing, videoconferencing, social networking, IM
    43. 43. AlternativesIndicates when employees must use each type of communication .
    44. 44. RecommendationEmployees will communicate most effectivelywhen they use the method with which they arethe most comfortable.Once people develop their emotional intelligenceto empathize between the generational gap, co-workers may be able to understand why eachmethod is preferable to differentgenerations, thus smoothing out thecommunication process.
    45. 45. References• A Boomer‘s Guide to Communicating with Gen X and Gen Y - BusinessWeek. (n.d.). . Retrieved May 5, 2011, from http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_34/b4097063805619.htm?chan=magazine+c hannel_special+report• Bayer, A. (2011). A Waste of a Generation: Social conflict may rear its head as graduates with reduced opportunities are forced to fund their profligate predecessors generous benefits. National Underwriter Company dba Summit Business Media. Retrieved from http://proxygsu- sho1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/854391577?accountid=13843• Creating sustainable work systems ... - Google Books. (n.d.). . Retrieved May 5, 2011, from http://books.google.com/books?id=yNbh1PHbUqcC&pg=PA56&dq=work+related+stress+generati on&hl=en&ei=qSPCTZbFDYTbgQfI- ezdAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CEQQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=work %20related%20stress%20generation&f=false• Docherty, P., & Shani, A. B. (2008). Creating sustainable work systems: developing social sustainability. Taylor & Francis.• GenerationalDiversityPHRAProject.pdf. (n.d.). . Retrieved from http://www.pittsburghhra.org/UserFiles/File/carrer_bank/GenerationalDiversityPHRAProject.pdf• Hofstede, G. H. (1984). Culture’s consequences: international differences in work-related values. SAGE.
    46. 46. References• How the ―Millennial‖; Generation Works - ProQuest Research Library - ProQuest. (n.d.). . Retrieved May 5, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.proxygsu- sho1.galileo.usg.edu/pqrl/docview/209613139/12F24006C20217C6885/19? accountid=13843• Kunreuther, F., Kim, H., & Rodriguez, R. (2008). Working Across Generations: Defining the Future of Nonprofit Leadership. John Wiley and Sons.• Lovely, S., & Buffum, A. G. (2007). Generations at school: building an age- friendly learning community. Corwin Press.• Using the kaleidoscope career model to examine generational differences in work attitudes - ProQuest Research Library - ProQuest. (n.d.). . Retrieved May 5, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.proxygsu- sho1.galileo.usg.edu/pqrl/docview/219334535/fulltext/12F24166C527ACD6 0D3/1?accountid=13843

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