Adult Student Retention at Shorter           University                  Proposal for the                  Associate of Sc...
offreshmen whoenter collegenever completethe degrees theyenrolled to pursuewithin a 6-yeartimeframe (NCES,2008).
Research ProblemINTRODUCTION
Problem Statement• Shorter University seeks a measurable increase in  both retention and persistence for its adult  degree...
Operational Definitions Retention • Students who stay in school and complete   his/her program Persistence • A student who...
SecondarySources
Literature ReviewBean, J.P. (1980). Dropouts and turnover: The synthesis and test of a causal model of student attrition. ...
Secondary Sources• Engagement of both onsite and remote  resources• Key stakeholder strategy sessions• Core process mapping
Research ObjectivesOneTwoThree
Retention
Applicant Readiness  EarlyWarningSystems     Remediation
Other Factors Curriculum • The content of the program, including   courses and method of delivery Faculty Skills • Instruc...
Back End Student Services• Financial Aid:  – Are students getting enough funds to complete his/her    program?  – Are stud...
Importance and BenefitsRESEARCH SIGNIFICANCE
Research Significance• Each student who drops out costs a school  thousands of dollars in lost investment and  future reve...
How can the CAPP improve retention and lower attrition rates in the AS program?RESEARCH DESIGN
Research Design Elements                                Secondary                                 Research                ...
Data Analysis       Track STOP courses       Return retention concerns       Performance Grid
Retention Value MetricsRESULTS: DELIVERABLES
Retention Value Metric #1     50% Attrition               40% Attrition• = year one retained       • = year one retained  ...
Persistence Value Metric #2If persistence to graduation can beincreased := value to brand, mission integrity,validation to...
Deliverables• Interviews of key stakeholders• Benchmarking industry best practices and providing  comparison data• Providi...
Deliverables• Several days onsite conducting process mapping for  core mission-critical processes• Ongoing process managem...
Budget and TimeChange Initiative Partnership   Time• $60,000                       • 6 months• One fee                    ...
Questions?
Adult student retention at shorter university final
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  • National Center for Educational Statistics (2008) estimates that around National Statistics* Recent research (2006) has demonstrated that attaining a degree makes a critical difference in the financial well-being of citizens. On the average, baccalaureate graduates earn almost three times more than their high school counterparts. For every 100 ninth graders, 68 graduate high school and only 40 enroll in college. 13 college students, one-third, will drop out the first year and only 18 graduate. Less than half of our enrolled college students attain a college degree in six years! By any standard this is a failure.
  • CAPP serves over 1700 Adult students. Of this number approximately 800 are enrolled in the Associate’s Program (AS). Annually in the AS program 400 new enrollments are expected and achieved. However, with this great lead generation creating a large front door into the institution, a large back door exists as well. The CAPP AS program is seeing 60% of its enrollments leave (attrition) the program very early on. This attrition leads to frustrated learners and damage to the institutional brand. The purpose of this proposal is to reduce attrition in the AS program and thereby increase persistence toward degree completion for the Adult Learners enrolled in Shorter University’s AS program.
  • While these definitions are simple and easy to understand, student paths are rarely this direct or straightforward. When looking at enrollment patterns that defy, or at least stretch these basic definitions we find: • Student A: Enrolls in a university, remains enrolled for two years, and stops out to return six years later. • Student B: Enrolls in a university, remains for one year and transfers to another university to complete the degree. 2 • Student C: Enrolls in two community colleges simultaneously, ultimately earning a certificate from one of them. • Student D: Enrolls in college but does not complete any credits. The next year the student reenrolls and remains continuously enrolled to degree completion. • Student E: Begins in a community college and successfully transfers to a university. However, the student is not successful at the university and leaves prior to earning any credits. The next semester the student returns to the community college taking the few remaining courses necessary to earn an associate degree. • Student F: Enrolls for a full-time load of 5 courses (15 units of college credits), but drops all but one class (3 units). • Student G: Enrolls in two courses, drops one keeping only a physical education course. • Student H: Enrolls in a community college for a full load of remedial courses, reenrolling in the same courses the next semester because he/she has not yet mastered the material. • Student I: Enrolls in a full time load of courses, but due to low GPA and lack of progress is academically suspended. • Student J: Due to unlawful behavior, is judiciously expelled from the university.
  • Continuance of a student in school or college enrollment. A student who enrolls in college and remains enrolled until degree completion The National Center for Education Statistics, however, differentiates the terms by using “retention” as an institutional measure and “persistence” as a student measure. In other words, institutions retain and students persist. Another term commonly used with retention is “attrition”. Attrition is the diminution in numbers of students resulting from lower student retention.
  • Data mining the business intelligence system and decision support system Shorter University already has in place (Cooper & Schindler, 2011).A literature review will be helpful to pinpoint more of the components experts have found to be key retention factors (see Appendix).Accounting reports generated by the accounting department. Especially the withdrawal report with coding.Exit interviews are conducted whenever a student graduates or withdrawals.Student orientation surveys are given during the end of the first class. This survey asks questions about ways to improve orientation and assess whether the student understood all the necessary information.Retention calling reports are generated by and outside service that calls new students systematically throughout their degree completion program.Satisfaction and needs surveys are given to students once a term through their email
  • How does the content of the program affect retention?How does the Faculty affect retention?How does persistence affect title iv and SACS?Continuance of a student in school or college enrollment. A student who enrolls in college and remains enrolled until degree completion The National Center for Education Statistics, however, differentiates the terms by using “retention” as an institutional measure and “persistence” as a student measure. In other words, institutions retain and students persist. Another term commonly used with retention is “attrition”. Attrition is the diminution in numbers of students resulting from lower student retention.
  • If attrition is reduced from 60% to 50%, 40 extra students= year one retained income of $396,900 on new prospect enrollment = if annualized over a five year impact, that 10% change = $1,984,500 in retained income If attrition is reduced from 60% to 40%, 80 extra students= year one retained income of $793,800 on new prospect enrollment = if annualized over a five year impact, that 20% change = $3,969,000 in retained income
  • • interviews of key stakeholders in each mission critical area of the AS program dealing with adult students and their retention and persistence • Benchmarking industry best practices and providing comparison data with the college’s current practices. • Providing recommendations for strategy and tactics setting • A comprehensive report on these factors
  • Adult student retention at shorter university final

    1. 1. Adult Student Retention at Shorter University Proposal for the Associate of Science Program
    2. 2. offreshmen whoenter collegenever completethe degrees theyenrolled to pursuewithin a 6-yeartimeframe (NCES,2008).
    3. 3. Research ProblemINTRODUCTION
    4. 4. Problem Statement• Shorter University seeks a measurable increase in both retention and persistence for its adult degree programs.• Currently the retention rate is at 40% with makes the attrition rate 60%. – Retention of 50% to 60% is the nation’s mean for Adult Students in Higher Education (NCES, 2008).
    5. 5. Operational Definitions Retention • Students who stay in school and complete his/her program Persistence • A student who enrolls in college and remains enrolled until degree completion Attrition • The total number of students who drop-out of a program
    6. 6. SecondarySources
    7. 7. Literature ReviewBean, J.P. (1980). Dropouts and turnover: The synthesis and test of a causal model of student attrition. Research in Higher Education, 12(2), 155-187.Braxton, J.M. & Lee, S.D. (2005). Toward a reliable knowledge about college student departure. In Seidman, A. (Eds) (2005). College student retention: Formula for student success. Westport, CT: Praeger.Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E. J., & Associates. (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Metz, G. (2004). Challenge and changes to tintos persistence theory: A historical review. Journal of College Student Retention, 6(2), 191-207. Retrieved April 29, 2010, from OmniFile Full Text Mega database,National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). (2008). Digest of education statistics 2009. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.Tinto, V. (1982). Limits of theory and practice in student attrition. Journal of Higher Education, 53(6), 687- 700.Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Tinto, V. (2003). Student success and the building of involving educational communities. Higher Education Monograph Series, Syracuse University, No. 2.Tinto, V., & Cullen, J. (1973). Dropout in higher education: A review and theoretical synthesis of recent research. [S.l.]: Columbia Univ. Teachers College. Retrieved January 3, 2010 from ERIC.
    8. 8. Secondary Sources• Engagement of both onsite and remote resources• Key stakeholder strategy sessions• Core process mapping
    9. 9. Research ObjectivesOneTwoThree
    10. 10. Retention
    11. 11. Applicant Readiness EarlyWarningSystems Remediation
    12. 12. Other Factors Curriculum • The content of the program, including courses and method of delivery Faculty Skills • Instructor’s competency and ability to teach students the curriculum • Facilitating student growth Persistence • Impacts on Title IV • Impacts on SACS
    13. 13. Back End Student Services• Financial Aid: – Are students getting enough funds to complete his/her program? – Are students receiving aid in a timely manner?• Registrar/Academic Advisor: – Are the students getting registered and evaluated correctly? – Are students getting advised correctly?• Accounting Services: – Are the student funds being processed in an efficient and accurate manner?
    14. 14. Importance and BenefitsRESEARCH SIGNIFICANCE
    15. 15. Research Significance• Each student who drops out costs a school thousands of dollars in lost investment and future revenue (Braxton, 2005).• The United States is competing globally for these high value jobs and careers and the higher education system must prepare their students for this reality (Tinto, 1993).
    16. 16. How can the CAPP improve retention and lower attrition rates in the AS program?RESEARCH DESIGN
    17. 17. Research Design Elements Secondary Research Needs Data Mining Survey Retention Accounting Calling Data Reports Methods Satisfaction Surveys Registration • Student Data Services Orientation Exit Surveys interviews
    18. 18. Data Analysis Track STOP courses Return retention concerns Performance Grid
    19. 19. Retention Value MetricsRESULTS: DELIVERABLES
    20. 20. Retention Value Metric #1 50% Attrition 40% Attrition• = year one retained • = year one retained income of $396,900 on income of $793,800 on new prospect enrollment new prospect enrollment• = if annualized over a • = if annualized over a five year impact, that five year impact, that 10% change = 20% change = $1,984,500 in retained $3,969,000 in retained income income
    21. 21. Persistence Value Metric #2If persistence to graduation can beincreased := value to brand, mission integrity,validation to Federal Title IV disbursementand SACS accreditation
    22. 22. Deliverables• Interviews of key stakeholders• Benchmarking industry best practices and providing comparison data• Providing recommendations for strategy and tactics setting• A comprehensive report on these factors
    23. 23. Deliverables• Several days onsite conducting process mapping for core mission-critical processes• Ongoing process management and team meetings both onsite and virtual – o Measuring progress – o Clear feedback loops – o Visible change
    24. 24. Budget and TimeChange Initiative Partnership Time• $60,000 • 6 months• One fee • The project terminates at the• No travel costs end of the cycles• No “meter running”
    25. 25. Questions?

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