34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
34
th
WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development an...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Knowledge management a practical inquiry into knowledge gap, local practice poster#320

239 views

Published on

The knowledge management is an integral part of sustainability process. It becomes pivotal in any community based development project. The knowledge society contributes to quality inputs and cascades the benefits to the next generations. It is an intellectual heritage; it ought to be owned and translated into development activities by the beneficiary community.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
239
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Knowledge management a practical inquiry into knowledge gap, local practice poster#320

  1. 1. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 1 Knowledge Management as Integral Part of Sustainability -A Practical Inquiry into Knowledge Gap, Local Practice and Institutionalizing Community Memory Abstract: The knowledge management is an integral part of sustainability process. It becomes pivotal in any community based development project. The knowledge society contributes to quality inputs and cascades the benefits to the next generations. It is an intellectual heritage; it ought to be owned and translated into development activities by the beneficiary community. The capacity building, in the most of development intervention, has been used with limited sense. The paper looks it in a broader sense and the author discusses existing ‘knowledge gaps’ palpable in the development intervention facilitated and funded by INGOs and multilateral organizations. When the projects come to an end, the technical knowledge also goes with them. Because, the absence of institutional arrangement to manage the knowledge. The less focus lies in investing in institutionalizing the local memory as a tool of knowledge management. Based on the framework developed by the author, in which the knowledge management is sin qua non component. It covers promoting community practices, managing community knowledge and translating the community memory into institutional practice.
  2. 2. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 2 The institutional arrangement revert the knowledge to the beneficiary. They (the community and state) systematically promote and sustain the impact of the intervention. A knowledge society means of having institutional arrangement for managing the knowledge vertically and horizontally. Introduction: Managing knowledge is a social function. Thus is serves the society which maintains it. This is not only a tool of social mobility and stability; but also an agent of social change and social transformation. In order to make a beneficiary community, implementing agency and donor organization learning institutions, the most important task managers are required to perform is to formulate a strategy for knowledge management. Having done that, the next step to be adopted is to redesign the present functional structure. This may involve creating infrastructure for sharing gained knowledge, networking among the actors at deferent levels: beneficiaries, implementers and donors vertically and horizontally. The focus is sharing and managing knowledge among and between the beneficiaries on one hand, and learning from them by the other layers: implementers and funders on the other hand. This encourages interdependence among them. The palpable gap is there is no institutional arrangement. Strategy and Behaviour The measures to get adopted are to transform the prevailing culture is to manage knowledge is done with prolonged approach: through strategy and through behaviour. The most of the project are project- completion based not sustainability based approach even though the word ‘sustainability’, in many of the projects, loosely used in the project proposal to attract and secure the
  3. 3. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 3 fund from donors. The managers are busy with time frame set to achieve the indicators, rather than not changing the vulnerable condition into socially transformed phenomenon. This social transformation should be viewed and planned in a bigger picture of the sustainability approach within the particular development context; not merely based on programme completion approach. The frame work (figure: 1), developed by the author, depicts the bigger picture with the focus on knowledge management. Frame work for Sustainability of Community Based Development Projects. Source: Munas Kalden (2008)
  4. 4. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 4 Knowledge Management: Characteristics The working definition of knowledge management is the acquisition, storage, retrieval, application, generation, and review of the knowledge assets of an organization in a controlled way (Watson, 2003: 5). The project interventions, at the community level, have these elements. The gap is not interconnected. The acquisition takes place; the storage happens. The ‘application’ has no linkage with ‘generation’. It goes alone. Any lessons learnt in a particular community endeavors has not been incorporated. The intervention has involved in generation of knowledge; but less focus on institutionalizing those elements with each other and sharing with as many as possible of vast acquaintances. The act of managing knowledge (rather than managing the people that mange knowledge) can be characterized by the followings (Watson, 2003: 14): 1. acquire knowledge (learn, create or identify) 2. analyze knowledge (assess, validate or value) 3. preserve knowledge (organize, represent or maintain) and 4. use knowledge (apply, transfer or share) Knowledge Management: Sustainability Features The knowledge management sustainability features, according to the author, the following becomes important based on the field experience gained during the professional engagement with the international organizations as well as National Ministries in the country where the author comes from. The features are operationally interconnected; practically coincided. In the sustainability aspect of the knowledge management, there are
  5. 5. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 5 not viewed separately. They are given below. Figure: 2 Integrated Knowledge Management Approach, Source: Munas Kalden, 2008 promoting community practices Managing Community Knowledge translating the community memory into institutional practice Promoting Community Practices: The community managed projects, in their intervention, for instance, Community Based Water and Sanitation (Watsan) as well as Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRR) in Asian region much focus and light thrown on the promoting community practices. They use participatory appraisal tools (PRA) in getting their involvement in executing the intervention strategy. The beneficiary communities, in the region, are well internalized in using the PRA tools. Knowledge Management promoting community practices Managing Community Knowledge Translating the community memory into institutional practice Leadership Corporate Social Responsibility & Volunteerism Governance and Strategy
  6. 6. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 6 Managing Community Knowledge: The operational gap is palpable in this feature of knowledge management. The community has its own practices. They are well communitized and personalized. But nor managed. They keep managing by the form of practicing: good and bad. There should be a knowledge management intervention. Unlearning and discontinuing should be managed. Learning involves ‘unlearning and discontinuing’ (Peter Senge, 1990) as well. This feature connected with the next feature (translating community memory into institutional practice) functionally. When a community fails in institutionalizing in its practices, it begins of memory fading. Best practiced would be practiced in their day to day life akin to that of bad rituals. Translating the Community Memory into Institutional Practice: Kotter (1995) identifies institutionalizing new approaches for change and knowledge management. According to him, the change process goes through a series of phases that require a considerable length of time. He delineated eight steps. Of them, institutionalizing new approaches also occupy significant place. Knowledge exits in two forms: explicit knowledge that can be codified and tacit knowledge that can not always be codified. If a knowledge management is too formalized, much tacit knowledge will be lost. Thus knowledge representation for knowledge management system must be flexible and discursive. An Integrated Knowledge Management Approach: The figure: 2 above visualize this approach. It tries to integrate the content of leadership in the knowledge management process.
  7. 7. 34 th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Sustainable Development and Multisectoral Approaches Munas Kalden Technical Advisor, Disaster Preparedness Programme, (Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction) , International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/ American Red Cross, Sri Lanka Delegation. 62, Green Path, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Email: mkalden@amcrossasia.org munas.kalden@gmail.com 7 Knowledge Management: Gaps and Challenges Personal mobility Vs Institutionalization Linking the community activities with the research institutions Networking and sharing the best practices vertically and horizontally Recommendation: Local ways of framing development problems Engagement with social development knowledge seen as an entry point to work with government and international development institutions Strengthening the constitution of an alliance between policy makers, researchers and international development community Building a new knowledge society based on democratic principles and civic commitment. Democratizing research by drawing a greater range of civil society actors into that research process that has a greatest likelihood of influence within the society. Building knowledge infrastructure Democratization of knowledge Commoditization social knowledge (linking local intellectual) and Generate knowledge for evidence-based policy Key Words: Knowledge Management, Community Memory, Sustainability and Institutionalization References: 1. Dunphy, Dexter; Griffiths, Andrew and Benn, Suzanne. (2003) Organizational Change for Corporate Sustainability, Rutledge: London, New York. 2. Kotter, J.P. (1995), Leading Change: why transformation efforts fail. Harvard Business Review, March-April, pp. 56-63. 3. Senge, Peter (1990). The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of Learning Organization. New York: Doubleday. 4. Watson, Ian. (2003) Applying Knowledge Management: Techniques for Building Corporate Memories, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers: London, New York.

×