19 sept12 is social exclusion still important for older people

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The concept of social exclusion explicitly recognises that material exclusion is both caused by and causes exclusion from other domains essential for wellbeing, and builds on a longstanding tradition within public policy and social science research. However, the terminology ‘social exclusion’ is perhaps most synonymous with the former Labour government, with the coalition government having disbanded the Social Exclusion Unit Taskforce. In its place there exists something of a gulf in terminology to replace the usage of ‘social exclusion’ in policy-terms, although the concept itself continues to play some part in policy making, while the term itself is still widely used within academic research and in EU and UN policy

In comparison to children, young people, and families, social exclusion among older people has received little attention. This is despite the fact that it is perhaps among this group that the notion of social exclusion is most pertinent, with older people at high risk of social isolation and loneliness, as well as exhibiting substantial inequalities in income and housing. In addition, within the extant evidence base, there has been comparatively little longitudinal research into social exclusion patterns among older people.

At this event, ILC-UK presented the results from a report examining social exclusion among older people, 'Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People?', sponsored by Age UK. The work investigated trends in the number of socially excluded people, and examined their outcomes. Other speakers will also contribute to a debate that explores the underlying question of whether social exclusion should remain part of public policy and if ‘social exclusion is still important for older people’.

Agenda from the event:

08:15 – 08:30
Registration with Tea/Coffee/Pastries
08:30 – 08:35
Welcome - David Sinclair, ILC-UK
08:35 - 08:50
Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People? - Dylan Kneale, ILC-UK
08:50 - 09:10
Greg Lewis, Age UK
Justin Russell, Department for Work and Pensions
09:10 - 09:25
Debate
09:25 – 09:30
Close - David Sinclair, ILC-UK

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19 sept12 is social exclusion still important for older people

  1. 1. Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People? 19 September 2012 This event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded
  2. 2. Welcome David SinclairAssistant Director, Policy and Communications ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded
  3. 3. Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People? Dylan Kneale Head of Research ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded
  4. 4. Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People? Dylan Kneale, ILC-UK The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  5. 5. What is social exclusion?Broadest senseThe ‘exclusion’ in social exclusionNo, Arguably apolitical with a rich academic historyUN, Europe…UK? The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  6. 6. What is social exclusion for olderpeople?Social exclusion for adults centred around employment and opportunities – older people?For older people – much about keeping independent; Excluded from aspects of life that keep independentPhilipson and Scharf (2004): 4 risk factors The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  7. 7. The current study I Using data from English Longitudinal Study of Ageing Adapting framework by Barnes et al (2006); change between 2002 and 2008 The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  8. 8. What we found: Level of socialexclusion I18.0%16.0% Exclusion from Social Relationships14.0% +5.3% +5.6% Exclusion from Cultural +1.1% Activities12.0% Exclusion from Civic10.0% Activities and Information -0.6%8.0% -1.7% Exclusion from Local Amenities -0.8%6.0% Exclusion from Decent Housing and Public4.0% Transport -6.5% Exclusion from Financial2.0% Products0.0% Exclusion from Common The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank Consumer Goods 2002 2008 dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  9. 9. What we found: Level of socialexclusion II The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  10. 10. What we found: Level of socialexclusion III The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  11. 11. Who is most likely to be excluded? (2008)  Some likely suspects – but differs by domain…  Overall:  Demographic: Older; Non-white; Childless; Lived Alone/Lived with Children and No Partner/Lived without Partner  Health: Off work sick; Poor self-rated health; No regular uptake of physical exercise; Depressed; Experienced a fall  Socioeconomic: Poor-in the lowest quintile of equivilised household income; Living in rented housing; No car; The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank Living on benefits issuesthe main source of income dedicated to addressing as of longevity, ageing and population change.
  12. 12. Longitudinal analyses: transitions 6 years 2002 2008 50+ in 2002 More excluded Less excluded 24% 19% 50-59 in 2002 More excluded Less excluded 22% 21% 80+ in 2002 More excluded Less excluded The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to 35% addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population19% change.
  13. 13. Longitudinal analyses: predictors  Based on characteristics in 2002, who was most likely to be excluded in 2008?  Experienced disadvantage in 2002 (material and non- material); Older; Lived Alone; Poor self-rated health; Depressed; Poor: in the lowest quintile of equivilised household income; Living in rented housing; No car  Which changes in people’s characteristics were associated with becoming more excluded?  People who assumed caring responsibilities, who started to live alone, who became too sick to work, who developedLongevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank became The International poorer self-rated health, people who depressed, and issues of longevity, ageing and up less exercise dedicated to addressing people who took population change.
  14. 14. Longitudinal analyses: outcomes 0 Two domains Decent Housing One domain Three or more domains Social Relationships Common Consumer Goods Cultural Activities Financial Products Civic Activities Exclusion from Local Amenities-0.5 -1-1.5 -2-2.5 -3 The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank-3.5 dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  15. 15. Recommendations1 Shift policy directions away from ‘older people’s policies’ to ‘ageing policies’ inorder to tackle increasing exclusion among middle aged people2 Allocate the task of measuring and developing strategies to overcome materialand non-material disadvantage simultaneously to a specific unit or team withingovernment3 Improve planning of neighbourhoods for people of all ages to reduce levels ofexclusion from local amenities and decent housing and public transport4 Instigate further research into the trigger factors and roles of publicpolicy and services in helping older people move from being sociallyexcluded5 Encourage greater development of outreach provision to reach thehardest to reach before crises occur The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  16. 16. Recommendations6 Support programmes to encourage the development/uptake of financialproducts among disadvantaged older people7 Development of a widowhood strategy8 Provision of additional support for carers9 Greater investment in physical exercise services for older people withspecific focus on how to retain older people in programmes of physicalexercise10 Reduction of gender inequalities in social exclusion through expansionof existing intervention programmes The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  17. 17. Conclusions Advantages of social exclusion can also represent disadvantages At the heart of voluntary exclusion is involuntary exclusion? Benefit is short-hand way for policy-makers to assess necessary domains for maintaining independence and autonomy Often criticise lack of ‘joined-up’ thinking in policy – ‘social exclusion’ bucks this trend Some irrefutable evidence e.g. boomers The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  18. 18. Greg LewisProgramme Manager – Communities and Society Age UK Justin Russell Director – Ageing Society and State Pensions Department for Work and Pensions This event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded
  19. 19. Panel Debate and Q&AThis event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded
  20. 20. Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People? 19 September 2012 This event is kindly supported by Age UK #sociallyexcluded

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