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Community Informatics<br /> an introduction to what I do in grad school <br />Jeff Ginger<br />12.02.2009<br />
a definition<br />Community Informatics (CI) is an emerging field of study, practiceand activism that has grown in popular...
history<br />Term originally brought into common use by Loader and Gurstein in response to business and organization focus...
epistemology<br />All fields of knowledge depend upon one another<br />No form of knowledge is superior to another<br />Sc...
Participatory Action Research (PAR)<br />Pragmatist, critical and solution-oriented<br />Community involvement<br />With t...
example theories<br />Community Inquiry<br />Stresses addressing community-defined problems by building upon pre-existing ...
in-action<br />Featured here<br />Education in Paseo Boricua<br />Youth-driven CI<br />Tech Deployment in East St. Louis<b...
youth community informatics<br />Empowering kids to engage with technology and community – becoming citizen journalists, m...
education<br />Albizo Campos High School, Paseo Boricua<br />Puerto Rican neighborhood, gangs and high drop-out rate<br />...
East St. Louis<br />Dozens of students go down to install computer labs in social service centers (like the Eagles Nest Ho...
São Tomé e Príncipe<br />One Laptop per Child – a small team of university students helped to deploy 100 laptops in the gr...
community informatics club<br />Urbana Free Library Technology Training<br />Center for Women in Transition<br />Doris Hop...
get involved<br />www.cii.illinois.eduCommunity Informatics Initiative<br />www.communityinformaticsclub.comCommunity Info...
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Community Informatics Intro

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A short introduction to community informatics (CI) that covers theory, history, epistemology and examples of CI in practice.

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Community Informatics Intro

  1. 1. Community Informatics<br /> an introduction to what I do in grad school <br />Jeff Ginger<br />12.02.2009<br />
  2. 2. a definition<br />Community Informatics (CI) is an emerging field of study, practiceand activism that has grown in popularity and influence in recent years<br />As an academic discipline CI is typically situated within iSchools(LIS) and provides an important venue for their connection to community knowledge, educational practice, and social justice movements (Gurstein 2007)<br />Generally it focuses on solving community problems with information technologies and processes<br />
  3. 3. history<br />Term originally brought into common use by Loader and Gurstein in response to business and organization focused social informatics<br />As ICT’s and associated cultures embedded in our information society have evolved the lines between community, institutional, and individual ICT cultural practices have blurred<br />Land-Grant Universities have a duty to serve their local and state communities through public engagement<br />
  4. 4. epistemology<br />All fields of knowledge depend upon one another<br />No form of knowledge is superior to another<br />Science should not automatically occupy a privileged position<br />Science is not value-free and is political<br />We as researchers should promote positive social development on a small and large scale – outcomes should be measurable by the communities we serve<br />
  5. 5. Participatory Action Research (PAR)<br />Pragmatist, critical and solution-oriented<br />Community involvement<br />With the community (collaboration and partnership)<br />For the community (giving voice and ensuring everyone gains from insights and reaps rewards)<br />By the community (citizen scientists and community member-led projects)<br />Interdisciplinary, multi-method, inductive and deductive, many data-collection techniques<br />Research is subservient to community needs (positive community outcomes &gt; data/research outcomes)<br />
  6. 6. example theories<br />Community Inquiry<br />Stresses addressing community-defined problems by building upon pre-existing local resources and knowledge and necessitates reflexivity - questioning of community membership, values and goals<br />Represents process as a cycle of asking questions, performing investigations, creating understandings, and discussing and reflecting on them<br />Cyberpower<br />Theeffect of online activity on power (Alkalimat 2004)<br />Measurable outcome for individuals, groups, and on an ideological basis<br />Operationalized through a variety of metrics, such as valuable skills, experiences and social connections gained (social capital), always about a group’s ability to influence or address issues related to their needs<br />Providing individuals more than just access to technology, but critical and creative perspectives as wella s motivation to shape botht he use of tools and related behaviors and gain control over their participation in information society<br />
  7. 7. in-action<br />Featured here<br />Education in Paseo Boricua<br />Youth-driven CI<br />Tech Deployment in East St. Louis<br />Application abroad in São Tomé <br />Small-scale possibilities: CI club<br />Topics of CI<br />Digital divide/literacy<br />Community health<br />Citizen journalism<br />Civic and political engagement<br />Environmentalism<br />Virtual communities<br />More!<br />
  8. 8. youth community informatics<br />Empowering kids to engage with technology and community – becoming citizen journalists, media producers, technology teachers, map-makers and more<br />Rantoul PL Stories in [Stop]Motion workshop: 5th grade children took part in a 3 day workshop where they learned story-creation techniques, camera/film methods, and computer-based production and editing. The results were posted to YouTube (link)<br />Other projects included kid-driven citizen media, community mapping with GPS, peer mentors (link)<br />
  9. 9. education<br />Albizo Campos High School, Paseo Boricua<br />Puerto Rican neighborhood, gangs and high drop-out rate<br />Biology, technology, and community health: “As an example of critical education based on social ecology, our math and science classes have taken a close look at a recent study that found Humboldt Park to be a “Food Desert,” an area lacking in fresh fruits and vegetables. While learning their respective content area skills sets, the students have created a community development plan that includes multiple state-of-the-art hydroponically-based rooftop greenhouses, a conservatory, and the effective use of community gardens in and around Paseo Boricua. All of these components contribute to the community farmer’s market, of which the first produce will include all of the ingredients of the Puerto Rican seasoning called sofrito.” (link)<br />English, Google docs and digital literacy: students work on group writing projects using teacher-accessible Google accounts. Progress is tracked and their writing process is examined with attention given to their ability to provide new content, modify existing, correct one-another’s grammar, give integrative comments and feedback and otherwise participate frequently and deeply<br />
  10. 10. East St. Louis<br />Dozens of students go down to install computer labs in social service centers (like the Eagles Nest Homeless Services Center) and community churches to help ensure access to critical employment, education and health resources for locals<br />Other efforts have included the rescue, cataloging and preservation of materials for the Katherine Dunham community archives and museum<br />Prototyping of new information technology remote management systems (link) and online-based technology training guides (link)<br />
  11. 11. São Tomé e Príncipe<br />One Laptop per Child – a small team of university students helped to deploy 100 laptops in the grade school, letting teachers help to orchestrate the curriculum design and setting up a support wiki<br />GIS - ensuring the people of Sao Tome have access to and ownership of relevant local spatial data so they can better collaborate and make informed decisions about their land and resources; use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS)<br />
  12. 12. community informatics club<br />Urbana Free Library Technology Training<br />Center for Women in Transition<br />Doris Hopkins Archives<br />Kickapoo protest<br />Politics and Libraries on Amplified Librarians<br />
  13. 13. get involved<br />www.cii.illinois.eduCommunity Informatics Initiative<br />www.communityinformaticsclub.comCommunity Informatics Club<br />www.communityinformaticsprojects.comJeff Ginger’s CI research website<br />http://www.si.umich.edu/msi/ci.htmUniversity of Michigan CI specialization<br />http://www.ciresearch.net/Community Informatics Research Network<br />

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