Social Media as a Record for Public
Services and Utilities in a Disaster
How Government and Public Utilities used Social
M...
People Like Social Media
Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project
• 65% of adult internet users now say they...
Social Media can be a Record
“Made or received by an organization in pursuance of legal
obligations or in the transaction ...
Social Media Policy
AIIM International
• Integrate social media into an organization’s existing
governance policy.
• Polic...
Sample from Patricia Franks RACO 2011 Presentation:
“How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New...
Social Media and Sandy
Disasters = Unique Communication Environment
Time-Sensitive: Little time for reflection, open debat...
Social Media and Sandy
Six Categories of Social Media Use in a Disaster
• Public safety and crisis information disseminate...
Social Media and Sandy
Public safety and crisis information disseminated
before, during, and after
Social Media and Sandy
Public safety and crisis information disseminated
before, during, and after
Social Media and Sandy
Sending emergency warnings and alerts
Social Media and Sandy
Responding to requests for assistance
Social Media and Sandy
Direct message responses to
requests for assistance
and privacy issues
Social Media and Sandy
Gaining situational awareness and
utilizing multi-directional communications
Gaining situational awareness
and utilizing multi-directional
communications
+
Responding to requests
for assistance
Social Media and Sandy

Gaining situational awareness
and utilizing multi-directional
communications
(in a not good way)
Social Media and Sandy
Aiding in recovery efforts
Social Media and Sandy
Not Aiding in recovery efforts with incomplete information

3 Days Apart
Social Media and Sandy
Notifications for training or mobilizing first responders
(not really this time)
Social Media and Sandy
GARP
Accountability and Transparency
• Documented and approved social media policy or that social
m...
Social Media and Sandy
GARP
Integrity and Protection
• Clearly link identity to the organization and comply with
the socia...
Social Media and Sandy
GARP
Compliance
• Maintain records in keeping with company policy, applicable
local, state, or fede...
Social Media and Sandy
GARP
Availability, Retention, and Disposition
• Evaluate services for capture, indexing, and retrie...
Resources
• Franks, Patricia “How Federal Agencies Can Effectively
Manage Records Created Using New Social Media Tools” IB...
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Social Media as a Record for Public Services and Utilities in a Disaster

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How Government and Public Utilities in the New York City-area used Social Media during “Post-Tropical Cyclone” Sandy

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Social Media as a Record for Public Services and Utilities in a Disaster

  1. 1. Social Media as a Record for Public Services and Utilities in a Disaster How Government and Public Utilities used Social Media during “Post-Tropical Cyclone” Sandy
  2. 2. People Like Social Media Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project • 65% of adult internet users now say they use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn. (2011) • 74% of smartphone owners use their phone to get real-time locationbased information. (2012) • Some 15% of online adults use Twitter. (2012) Dartmouth Survey: Social Media Use by Fortune 500 Companies • 73% of Gas and Electric Utilities (16 of 22) used Twitter, 50% used Facebook, and 27% hosted a blog. (2012) Red Cross Survey (July 2010) • Social media sites ranked fourth as a resource for emergency information behind television news, radio and online news sites • One in five would try to contact responders through a digital means such as e-mail, websites or social media • Nearly half believe a response agency is probably already responding to any urgent request they might see
  3. 3. Social Media can be a Record “Made or received by an organization in pursuance of legal obligations or in the transaction of business” — ARMA However “The scope of discovery of electronically stored information does not depend on the internal designation or records classification that may or may not have been assigned to it. Any electronically stored information, whether or not it is internally viewed as of business, legal, regulatory, or personal value, is potentially discoverable.” — The Sedona Conference
  4. 4. Social Media Policy AIIM International • Integrate social media into an organization’s existing governance policy. • Policy should be “channel-neutral”. Patricia Franks, San Jose State University SLIS • Guided by the Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles. • Create a crosswalk between the existing records retention schedule and records generated through social media.
  5. 5. Sample from Patricia Franks RACO 2011 Presentation: “How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media Tools”
  6. 6. Social Media and Sandy Disasters = Unique Communication Environment Time-Sensitive: Little time for reflection, open debate, rebuttals Suppression: No longer an option Counter • Outdated, inaccurate, or false information • Malicious use Provide • “Expand the use of newer technologies to communicate with customers during outages (i.e. email, text messaging, and social media).” — Utility Performance Report Following Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee NYS Public Service Commission, June 2012
  7. 7. Social Media and Sandy Six Categories of Social Media Use in a Disaster • Public safety and crisis information disseminated before, during, and after various incidents; • Notifications for training or mobilizing first responders; • Sending emergency warnings and alerts; • Gaining situational awareness and utilizing multi-directional communications; • Responding to requests for assistance; • Aiding in recovery efforts. Social Media and Disasters: Current Uses, Future Options, and Policy Considerations, Congressional Research Service, Sept. 2011
  8. 8. Social Media and Sandy Public safety and crisis information disseminated before, during, and after
  9. 9. Social Media and Sandy Public safety and crisis information disseminated before, during, and after
  10. 10. Social Media and Sandy Sending emergency warnings and alerts
  11. 11. Social Media and Sandy Responding to requests for assistance
  12. 12. Social Media and Sandy Direct message responses to requests for assistance and privacy issues
  13. 13. Social Media and Sandy Gaining situational awareness and utilizing multi-directional communications
  14. 14. Gaining situational awareness and utilizing multi-directional communications + Responding to requests for assistance
  15. 15. Social Media and Sandy Gaining situational awareness and utilizing multi-directional communications (in a not good way)
  16. 16. Social Media and Sandy Aiding in recovery efforts
  17. 17. Social Media and Sandy Not Aiding in recovery efforts with incomplete information 3 Days Apart
  18. 18. Social Media and Sandy Notifications for training or mobilizing first responders (not really this time)
  19. 19. Social Media and Sandy GARP Accountability and Transparency • Documented and approved social media policy or that social media is included in a “channel-neutral” communications policy or internet policy. • Tool-specific and sector-specific procedures. • Have print copies of policy and procedures at backup site. • Specify who will manage social media accounts during a disaster and train them on special case usage.
  20. 20. Social Media and Sandy GARP Integrity and Protection • Clearly link identity to the organization and comply with the social media/communications policy • Ensure protection of data by updating data maps of the physical locations of all electronically stored records • Vet the reliability of any third party vendor • Alternative channels if platform goes down • Keep account in the hands of appropriate users and avoid malicious hijacking
  21. 21. Social Media and Sandy GARP Compliance • Maintain records in keeping with company policy, applicable local, state, or federal laws as well as any industry regulations. • Evaluate the risks and benefits of channel silence on an issue.
  22. 22. Social Media and Sandy GARP Availability, Retention, and Disposition • Evaluate services for capture, indexing, and retrieval (ArchiveSocial, Next Point CloudPreservation, Hanzo Archives) • Evaluate appropriate posting tools (Hootsuite, Radian 6) • Limits of control over third-party software: What if needed for longer than the terms of service allows? What if records should not exist as long as services maintain?
  23. 23. Resources • Franks, Patricia “How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media Tools” IBM Center for The Business of Government, 2012 • Lindsay, Bruce “Social Media and Disasters: Current Uses, Future Options, and Policy Considerations” Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, Sept. 6, 2011 • Redgrave, Jonathan “The Sedona Principles (Second Edition)” The Sedona Conference, June 2007 • “Best Practices Study of Social Media Records Policies” ACTIAC Collaboration & Transformation (C&T) Shared Interest Group (SIG), March 2011

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