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    • 62 U r b a n La N D   n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 ulx R o n N y r e n EmergingDesigners Projects by ten designers/ design duos in their 30s and 40s provide a glimpse into the future of architecture. Designers coming into their own in 2008 operate in a signifi- cantly different world than those emerging ten years ago. Urban con- texts have become denser while natural environments are shrinking, which, along with climate change, has pushed sustainability to the forefront of architectural—and global—consciousness. At the same time, economic expansion in fast-developing coun- tries like China has allowed for unusual experimentation on the forms of large-scale buildings, in many cases aided by the availability of new digital design technologies. The world still values icons, yet many architects coming into prominence recognize the vital role that structures play—not just as symbols, but also as partici- pants in the civic realm. In a time when people increasingly rely on electronic communications to stay in touch, attractive physical environments for public gathering may be more necessary than ever to seduce people away from their BlackBerrys, iPods, and virtual online worlds. Ron Nyren is a freelance architecture and urban design writer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. 1.RafiqAzam Shatotto Dhaka, Bangladesh Dhaka, Bangladesh, where 44-year-old Rafiq Azam was born and raised, has one of the world’s highest population densities. For several decades, the historic two-story courtyard houses of Old Dhaka have been subject to demoli- tion, replaced by high-rise apartment blocks that crowd together along the narrow streets, cutting off natural light and air. Azam, who studied with Australian architect Glenn Murcutt, founded his firm Shatotto in 1995 with a focus on “architecture for green living.” His design for the Kazedewan Apartment Building is representative of his mission to bring tenets of healthy living back to his native city. Completed in 2002, the five-story, 14-unit structure incorporates indigenous plants throughout, including a rooftop garden where inhabitants can gather (right). Sun- shades block direct sunlight during the hot sum- mers but let in breezes for ventilation. The ground floor is set back to give space back to the street. Azam’s other built work includes multifamily and single-family housing, office buildings, and a hospital for the Centre for the Rehabilitation for the Paralysed in Dhaka. Md.RafiqAzamandHassanSaifuddinChandan UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 62 11/17/08 3:38:27 PM
    • 62 U r b a n La N D   n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 ulx R o n N y r e n EmergingDesigners Projects by ten designers/ design duos in their 30s and 40s provide a glimpse into the future of architecture. Designers coming into their own in 2008 operate in a signifi- cantly different world than those emerging ten years ago. Urban con- texts have become denser while natural environments are shrinking, which, along with climate change, has pushed sustainability to the forefront of architectural—and global—consciousness. At the same time, economic expansion in fast-developing coun- tries like China has allowed for unusual experimentation on the forms of large-scale buildings, in many cases aided by the availability of new digital design technologies. The world still values icons, yet many architects coming into prominence recognize the vital role that structures play—not just as symbols, but also as partici- pants in the civic realm. In a time when people increasingly rely on electronic communications to stay in touch, attractive physical environments for public gathering may be more necessary than ever to seduce people away from their BlackBerrys, iPods, and virtual online worlds. Ron Nyren is a freelance architecture and urban design writer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. 1.RafiqAzam Shatotto Dhaka, Bangladesh Dhaka, Bangladesh, where 44-year-old Rafiq Azam was born and raised, has one of the world’s highest population densities. For several decades, the historic two-story courtyard houses of Old Dhaka have been subject to demoli- tion, replaced by high-rise apartment blocks that crowd together along the narrow streets, cutting off natural light and air. Azam, who studied with Australian architect Glenn Murcutt, founded his firm Shatotto in 1995 with a focus on “architecture for green living.” His design for the Kazedewan Apartment Building is representative of his mission to bring tenets of healthy living back to his native city. Completed in 2002, the five-story, 14-unit structure incorporates indigenous plants throughout, including a rooftop garden where inhabitants can gather (right). Sun- shades block direct sunlight during the hot sum- mers but let in breezes for ventilation. The ground floor is set back to give space back to the street. Azam’s other built work includes multifamily and single-family housing, office buildings, and a hospital for the Centre for the Rehabilitation for the Paralysed in Dhaka. Md.RafiqAzamandHassanSaifuddinChandan UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 62 11/17/08 3:38:27 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 63 2.AnthonyBernheimerandJaredDellaValle Della Valle + Bernheimer Design New York, New York Della Valle + Bernheimer Design formed back in 1996 when Anthony Bernheimer (above left) and Jared Della Valle (above right)—in their 20s at the time—won the commission to redesign San Francisco’s Federal Building Plaza. Completed in 2000, their transformation tilted the entire 400-foot-long (122-m-long) site into a gradually rising ramp (top left), a novel approach to blocking cold winds—with a ten-foot-high (3.05-m-high) western edge, satisfying ADA requirements, and enhancing security. The firm has gone on to design residential, commercial, hospitality, and civic projects. Recently, it served as codeveloper of Glenmore Gardens, five semidetached condominium buildings in Brooklyn, New York, com- pleted in 2007. The duo designed two of the structures (left) and brought in three other firms to collaborate on the design of the others. Developed under the auspices of the city of New York’s department of housing pres- ervation and development, each of the two-family rowhouses has its own look, even though facades all use the same materials: 90 percent recycled corrugated aluminum, fiber cement panels, and renewable cedar siding. RichardBarnesRichardBarnes 3.ChrisBosse Laboratory for Visionary Architecture Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Born in 1971 in Stuttgart, Germany, Chris Bosse has long been fascinated by the intersection of virtual design and architecture. As a project architect at PTW in Sydney, Australia, Bosse played a strong role in developing the now- famous bubble concept for the exterior of Beijing’s National Swimming Center, designed by PTW, Arup, and China State Construction and Engineering. Nicknamed “the Water Cube,” the National Swimming Center has a skin made of transparent plastic in a pattern modeled after soap bubbles (right). Bubbles, like organic cells and mineral crystals, represent the most efficient subdivision of three- dimensional space in nature, and Bosse’s other work often uses digital technologies to capitalize on these forms. While at PTW, Bosse was behind the Moët & Chandon Marquee for the Melbourne Cup 2005 horseracing event, creating a 32.8-by-32.8-foot (10-by-10-m) Lycra pavilion that weighs 77 pounds (35 kg) and can be put together in an hour (above). In 2007, Bosse left PTW to form the Laboratory for Visionary Architecture with fellow principals Tobias Wallisser and Alexander Rieck. The firm has offices in Sydney, Stuttgart, and Dubai. ChrisBosse ChrisBosse UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 63 11/17/08 3:38:36 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 63 2.AnthonyBernheimerandJaredDellaValle Della Valle + Bernheimer Design New York, New York Della Valle + Bernheimer Design formed back in 1996 when Anthony Bernheimer (above left) and Jared Della Valle (above right)—in their 20s at the time—won the commission to redesign San Francisco’s Federal Building Plaza. Completed in 2000, their transformation tilted the entire 400-foot-long (122-m-long) site into a gradually rising ramp (top left), a novel approach to blocking cold winds—with a ten-foot-high (3.05-m-high) western edge, satisfying ADA requirements, and enhancing security. The firm has gone on to design residential, commercial, hospitality, and civic projects. Recently, it served as codeveloper of Glenmore Gardens, five semidetached condominium buildings in Brooklyn, New York, com- pleted in 2007. The duo designed two of the structures (left) and brought in three other firms to collaborate on the design of the others. Developed under the auspices of the city of New York’s department of housing pres- ervation and development, each of the two-family rowhouses has its own look, even though facades all use the same materials: 90 percent recycled corrugated aluminum, fiber cement panels, and renewable cedar siding. RichardBarnesRichardBarnes 3.ChrisBosse Laboratory for Visionary Architecture Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Born in 1971 in Stuttgart, Germany, Chris Bosse has long been fascinated by the intersection of virtual design and architecture. As a project architect at PTW in Sydney, Australia, Bosse played a strong role in developing the now- famous bubble concept for the exterior of Beijing’s National Swimming Center, designed by PTW, Arup, and China State Construction and Engineering. Nicknamed “the Water Cube,” the National Swimming Center has a skin made of transparent plastic in a pattern modeled after soap bubbles (right). Bubbles, like organic cells and mineral crystals, represent the most efficient subdivision of three- dimensional space in nature, and Bosse’s other work often uses digital technologies to capitalize on these forms. While at PTW, Bosse was behind the Moët & Chandon Marquee for the Melbourne Cup 2005 horseracing event, creating a 32.8-by-32.8-foot (10-by-10-m) Lycra pavilion that weighs 77 pounds (35 kg) and can be put together in an hour (above). In 2007, Bosse left PTW to form the Laboratory for Visionary Architecture with fellow principals Tobias Wallisser and Alexander Rieck. The firm has offices in Sydney, Stuttgart, and Dubai. ChrisBosse ChrisBosse UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 63 11/17/08 3:38:36 PM
    • 64 U r b a n La N D   n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 TimGriffith ulx 4.JamesDayton James Dayton Design Ltd. Minneapolis, Minnesota In 2007, the MacPhail Center for Music, a 100-year-old nonprofit community music school, opened its new home in downtown Minneapolis, a playful yet coherent collage of Cor-Ten steel, galvanized steel panels, glass curtain wall, and brick (right). Its contem- porary design stands out amid the renovated buildings of the city’s historic Mill District, but its massing and use of industrial materials harmonize with the context. That combination of architectural kinetics and prac- tical midwestern restraint characterizes the work of James Dayton, who worked in Frank Gehry’s office for five years before founding his own firm in 1997. The design touches emphasize daylight and community, as in the MacPhail Center’s atrium, which includes triple-height steps for casual sitting and gathering and a performance nook to provide a less formal venue for playing music outside the 225-seat concert hall. Dayton first came to prominence with his design for the Min- netonka Center for the Arts in Wayzata, Minnesota, which opened in 2002. He continues to work in cultural facilities as well as commercial and multifamily residential projects. AndreaRugg 5.RichardHassellandWongMunSumm WOHA Architects Singapore With Newton Suites, WOHA Architects combine modernism with sensitiv- ity to the climate of the tropics in their approach to the high rise. The exterior of the 36-story residential tower, built in 2007, is alive with green walls and “skygardens” and protected from the sun with horizontal, metal mesh screens that are angled to preserve views (left). Ample balconies take advantage of cooling breezes for outdoor living and facilitate natural ventila- tion. Creepers enclose the above-ground parking structure, soaking up car exhaust. WOHA’s founders, Australian Richard Hassell (above left) and Singaporean Wong Mun Summ (above right), first forged their cross-cultural partnership working at Kerry Hill Architects, which has offices in Singapore and Fremantle, Australia, in the early 1990s. They formed WOHA in Singapore in 1994, and have completed numerous multifamily residences throughout Asia, as well as the Church of St. Mary of the Angels in Singapore, completed in 2003, and the Stadium MRT Station, which opened this year near Singapore’s National Stadium. TomBerthiaume UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 64 11/17/08 3:38:42 PM
    • 64 U r b a n La N D   n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 TimGriffith ulx 4.JamesDayton James Dayton Design Ltd. Minneapolis, Minnesota In 2007, the MacPhail Center for Music, a 100-year-old nonprofit community music school, opened its new home in downtown Minneapolis, a playful yet coherent collage of Cor-Ten steel, galvanized steel panels, glass curtain wall, and brick (right). Its contem- porary design stands out amid the renovated buildings of the city’s historic Mill District, but its massing and use of industrial materials harmonize with the context. That combination of architectural kinetics and prac- tical midwestern restraint characterizes the work of James Dayton, who worked in Frank Gehry’s office for five years before founding his own firm in 1997. The design touches emphasize daylight and community, as in the MacPhail Center’s atrium, which includes triple-height steps for casual sitting and gathering and a performance nook to provide a less formal venue for playing music outside the 225-seat concert hall. Dayton first came to prominence with his design for the Min- netonka Center for the Arts in Wayzata, Minnesota, which opened in 2002. He continues to work in cultural facilities as well as commercial and multifamily residential projects. AndreaRugg 5.RichardHassellandWongMunSumm WOHA Architects Singapore With Newton Suites, WOHA Architects combine modernism with sensitiv- ity to the climate of the tropics in their approach to the high rise. The exterior of the 36-story residential tower, built in 2007, is alive with green walls and “skygardens” and protected from the sun with horizontal, metal mesh screens that are angled to preserve views (left). Ample balconies take advantage of cooling breezes for outdoor living and facilitate natural ventila- tion. Creepers enclose the above-ground parking structure, soaking up car exhaust. WOHA’s founders, Australian Richard Hassell (above left) and Singaporean Wong Mun Summ (above right), first forged their cross-cultural partnership working at Kerry Hill Architects, which has offices in Singapore and Fremantle, Australia, in the early 1990s. They formed WOHA in Singapore in 1994, and have completed numerous multifamily residences throughout Asia, as well as the Church of St. Mary of the Angels in Singapore, completed in 2003, and the Stadium MRT Station, which opened this year near Singapore’s National Stadium. TomBerthiaume UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 64 11/17/08 3:38:42 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 65 6.RóisínHeneghanandShih-FuPeng Heneghan.Peng.Architects Dublin, Ireland Róisín Heneghan (far left) and Shih-Fu Peng (left) met at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the early 1990s; their first collaboration was a paper on Bernard Tschumi’s design of the Parc de la Villette, the largest park in Paris, France, with its cultural institutions, recreational fields, and 35 red follies. The pair soon began taking on large-scale commissions. A year after they founded their firm in 1999, they won the competition to design the $55.7 million Áras Chill Dara, the Kildare County Council Civic Offices in Nass, Ireland. Designed in association with Dublin-based Arthur Gibney & Part- ners and completed in 2005, the building houses offices for 400 and a council chamber. In response to the government’s wish for architec- ture that would invite the public, the designers organized the building into two tilting bars and a glass-enclosed link that open up to pres- ent the city with a civic garden (right). Sustainable strategies include natural ventilation, a louvered facade that redirects natural light into workspaces, and solar panels. The firm has continued to win competitions, beating out more than 1,500 submissions to design the Grand Museum of Egypt in Giza, set to open in 2011. 7.MonicaPoncedeLeonandNaderTehrani Office dA Boston, Massachusetts The unusual wedge shape of Boston’s Macallen Building (left) responds to complex conditions on different sides: an industrial zone, an empty landscape of railroad tracks and roadways, and a street of older low-rise residences. The 11-story northern facade, clad in a glass curtain wall and bronzed aluminum, looks across the tracks to Boston’s skyline, while the southern side blends with its low-rise neighbors in both its height and its brick cladding. Stag- gered steel trusses—expressed on the facade—eliminate the need for interior structural columns. The roof is planted with ground cover, and the dramatic slope helps with rainwater collection for irrigation. Other sustainable elements include rapidly renewable and recycled materials and high-efficiency heat pumps. Completed in 2007, the 144 condominiums are the product of Monica Ponce de Leon (above left) and Nader Tehrani (above right), founders of Boston-based Office dA in 1991. Their quirky sensitivity to site and sustainability shows up in much of their work, including the Helios House, a green-roofed Los Angeles gas station built in 2007 of recycled materials—including reused billboards. JohnHornerPhotography ©HisaoSuzuki UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 65 11/17/08 3:38:45 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 65 6.RóisínHeneghanandShih-FuPeng Heneghan.Peng.Architects Dublin, Ireland Róisín Heneghan (far left) and Shih-Fu Peng (left) met at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the early 1990s; their first collaboration was a paper on Bernard Tschumi’s design of the Parc de la Villette, the largest park in Paris, France, with its cultural institutions, recreational fields, and 35 red follies. The pair soon began taking on large-scale commissions. A year after they founded their firm in 1999, they won the competition to design the $55.7 million Áras Chill Dara, the Kildare County Council Civic Offices in Nass, Ireland. Designed in association with Dublin-based Arthur Gibney & Part- ners and completed in 2005, the building houses offices for 400 and a council chamber. In response to the government’s wish for architec- ture that would invite the public, the designers organized the building into two tilting bars and a glass-enclosed link that open up to pres- ent the city with a civic garden (right). Sustainable strategies include natural ventilation, a louvered facade that redirects natural light into workspaces, and solar panels. The firm has continued to win competitions, beating out more than 1,500 submissions to design the Grand Museum of Egypt in Giza, set to open in 2011. 7.MonicaPoncedeLeonandNaderTehrani Office dA Boston, Massachusetts The unusual wedge shape of Boston’s Macallen Building (left) responds to complex conditions on different sides: an industrial zone, an empty landscape of railroad tracks and roadways, and a street of older low-rise residences. The 11-story northern facade, clad in a glass curtain wall and bronzed aluminum, looks across the tracks to Boston’s skyline, while the southern side blends with its low-rise neighbors in both its height and its brick cladding. Stag- gered steel trusses—expressed on the facade—eliminate the need for interior structural columns. The roof is planted with ground cover, and the dramatic slope helps with rainwater collection for irrigation. Other sustainable elements include rapidly renewable and recycled materials and high-efficiency heat pumps. Completed in 2007, the 144 condominiums are the product of Monica Ponce de Leon (above left) and Nader Tehrani (above right), founders of Boston-based Office dA in 1991. Their quirky sensitivity to site and sustainability shows up in much of their work, including the Helios House, a green-roofed Los Angeles gas station built in 2007 of recycled materials—including reused billboards. JohnHornerPhotography ©HisaoSuzuki UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 65 11/17/08 3:38:45 PM
    • 66 U r b a n La N D   n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 ulx 8.XuTiantian DnA_Design & Architecture Beijing, China China’s architects are coming of age in a whirlwind of development, and sometimes they have to create structures within a con- text that is still coming into shape. With a master’s degree in urban design from Harvard and experience working for Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, Xu Tiantian set up DnA_Design & Architecture in Beijing in 2004. Already she has a number of com- pleted projects under her belt, including the Songzhuang Art Center (above left) in the “art village” of Songzhuang outside Beijing. Completed in 2006, it is the village’s first public art facility, designed to give artists a place to gather—while the spaces remain flexible to meet different needs as the city grows. The glass-enclosed ground level consists of a multipurpose space for socializing, with gallery space on the second level clad in brick. Other recent and ongoing projects include the Ordos Art Museum (left) in Inner Mongolia—the first building of the city of Ordos’s civic center—and the Changbaishan Public Activity Center, centerpiece for the developing resort town of Baixi. SavoyePhotographySavoyePhotography UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 66 11/17/08 3:38:53 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 67 10.PeiZhu Studio Pei-Zhu Beijing, China The design for the Digital Beijing Building (left), by Pei Zhu and his partner, Wu Tong, is less dramatic, perhaps, than its compatriots on Beijing’s Olympic Green—Herzog & de Mueron’s exuberant National Stadium and the glowing bubbles of PTW’s National Swimming Center. But it is no less high-concept: designed to house all the control technology for the 2008 Olympic Games— and exhibitions after the games—its four concrete and steel frame slabs rise 11 stories above ground, stacked parallel to suggest a bar code when viewed from the side. The voids in between are also functional, facilitating ventilation for the electronics packed within. The western facade’s recessed lines of glass etch out a pattern reminiscent of computer motherboards; the eastern facade incorporates animated LEDs. Zhu’s experimentation with materials shows up in other proj- ects like the Blur Hotel in Beijing, which refurbished a former government building with a facade of fiberglass-reinforced plastic, recalling Chinese paper lanterns. His design for the forthcoming Art Museum of Yue Minjun in the Sichuan Prov- ince’s Qingcheng Mountains, along the Shimeng River, takes the shape of a river pebble, coated with reflective metal to disappear into the landscape. UL 9.MingZhang MulvannyG2 Architecture Bellevue, Washington Born in China in 1963 and equipped with a U.S. graduate degree in archi- tecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Ming Zhang straddles East and West, combining a focus on sustainability with a high- tech spirit. He joined MulvannyG2 Architecture in 1998. As senior partner and design director, he is responsible for several high-rise designs in China, such as the Fujian Provincial Electric and Power Company, a 31-story headquarters completed in 2007 and topped by a 22-story communications tower modeled after a lightning bolt (left). Sus- tainable elements include a glass curtain wall for natural light, natural ventilation, and energy-efficient glass. At a smaller scale, the Redmond City Hall (right) in Redmond, Washington—home of Microsoft Corporation and Nintendo— reflects officials’ desire to represent the fast-growing municipal- ity’s aspirations, exemplify governmental transparency, and provide a “living room for the public.” Limestone panels and a copper entrance canopy complement extensive glass that provides views through the building to the Sammamish River. Opened in 2006, the edifice incorporates gardens and a park, as well as local and recycled materials, water-efficient land- scaping, bike storage, and electric vehicle charging stations. ShenZhonghai SteveKeating MarcGerritsen UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 67 11/17/08 3:39:04 PM
    • n o v e m b e r / d e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 U r b a n La n D 67 10.PeiZhu Studio Pei-Zhu Beijing, China The design for the Digital Beijing Building (left), by Pei Zhu and his partner, Wu Tong, is less dramatic, perhaps, than its compatriots on Beijing’s Olympic Green—Herzog & de Mueron’s exuberant National Stadium and the glowing bubbles of PTW’s National Swimming Center. But it is no less high-concept: designed to house all the control technology for the 2008 Olympic Games— and exhibitions after the games—its four concrete and steel frame slabs rise 11 stories above ground, stacked parallel to suggest a bar code when viewed from the side. The voids in between are also functional, facilitating ventilation for the electronics packed within. The western facade’s recessed lines of glass etch out a pattern reminiscent of computer motherboards; the eastern facade incorporates animated LEDs. Zhu’s experimentation with materials shows up in other proj- ects like the Blur Hotel in Beijing, which refurbished a former government building with a facade of fiberglass-reinforced plastic, recalling Chinese paper lanterns. His design for the forthcoming Art Museum of Yue Minjun in the Sichuan Prov- ince’s Qingcheng Mountains, along the Shimeng River, takes the shape of a river pebble, coated with reflective metal to disappear into the landscape. UL 9.MingZhang MulvannyG2 Architecture Bellevue, Washington Born in China in 1963 and equipped with a U.S. graduate degree in archi- tecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Ming Zhang straddles East and West, combining a focus on sustainability with a high- tech spirit. He joined MulvannyG2 Architecture in 1998. As senior partner and design director, he is responsible for several high-rise designs in China, such as the Fujian Provincial Electric and Power Company, a 31-story headquarters completed in 2007 and topped by a 22-story communications tower modeled after a lightning bolt (left). Sus- tainable elements include a glass curtain wall for natural light, natural ventilation, and energy-efficient glass. At a smaller scale, the Redmond City Hall (right) in Redmond, Washington—home of Microsoft Corporation and Nintendo— reflects officials’ desire to represent the fast-growing municipal- ity’s aspirations, exemplify governmental transparency, and provide a “living room for the public.” Limestone panels and a copper entrance canopy complement extensive glass that provides views through the building to the Sammamish River. Opened in 2006, the edifice incorporates gardens and a park, as well as local and recycled materials, water-efficient land- scaping, bike storage, and electric vehicle charging stations. ShenZhonghai SteveKeating MarcGerritsen UL NovDec 08 ULX.indd 67 11/17/08 3:39:04 PM