When Bad Things Happen to Good Projects

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When Bad Things Happen to Good Projects

  1. 1. When Bad Things Happen to Good Projects MTP4030 Tuesday, 2:45 p.m. Tim Salaver Dana Software, Inc.September 23, 2003 Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana Software, Inc. 1
  2. 2. Project – One Definition Temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service Project Management is the “application of knowledge, skills, tools, and technology to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholders needs and expectations from a project.”Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 2 September 23, So
  3. 3. Project – Another Definition A never-ending cycle of stress, failure, mismanaged expectations that satisfies no one and wastes time and resources. Project Management – it can’t be done!!! An oxymoron!!!Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 3 September 23, So
  4. 4. Project HappensThe Standish Group International reports: “Corporate America spends more than $275 billion/year on Application Software Development Projects, many of which fail due to lack of skilled project management. Only 26% of projects were successful (on-time/on- budget) 26% of projects will cost 189% of their original estimate 40% of all IT projects fail or are canceled $74 billion spent by US firms on cancelled projects each year Over 60% of the projects do not produce the projected R.O.I. Project Management sets the standard for poor qualityCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 4 September 23, So
  5. 5. “…the average cycle time for ITprojects are 27 weeks. The onesthat are cancelled are cancelledafter 14 weeks; at that point intime they are 52% complete.Many of the project teams knowthat the project is likely to fail 6weeks before it is cancelled.” Wall Street JournalCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 5 September 23, So
  6. 6. “In a 4-year period an applicationdevelopment organization of 100developers can expect to spendmore than $10 million oncancelled contracts.” The Gartner GroupCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 6 September 23, So
  7. 7. The Hubble Bubble$1.5 million blunder which found in the first 6 months of operation: Deformed mirror Two out of six memory banks failed Flopping solar-energy panels The velocity measurement system failed Chemistry of celestial objects systems failed Three gyroscopes failed Four tons of repair parts costing $100’s of millions were sent into spaceCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 7 September 23, So
  8. 8. Why Projects Fail Failure to adhere to committed schedule caused by  Variances  Exceptions  Poor planning  Delays  Scope CreepCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 8 September 23, So
  9. 9. Why Projects Fail Poor resource utilization  Proper skills not available when they are needed on the project  The time of the individuals was not used wisely  Unable to locate the right skills within the organization  The best people were not assigned to the most critical jobs  Misalignment of skills and assignmentsCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 9 September 23, So
  10. 10. Why Projects Fail Project Portfolio not managed correctly  The wrong projects selected  The wrong resources were assigned to the projects  High risk projects were not identified  Poor control over interdependencies between projectsCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 10September 23, So
  11. 11. Why Projects Fail Loss of intellectual capital/knowledge capital  Lack of the means to transfer knowledge from past projects to future projects  People leave the organization or are assigned to other activitiesCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 11September 23, So
  12. 12. Why Projects Fail Change not accepted  User community is unprepared  Resistance crops up in undelivered tasks and unmet milestonesCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 12September 23, So
  13. 13. What is a Good Project? Aligned to the vision of the corporation Project has clear objective to improve processesCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 13September 23, So
  14. 14. Twelve Steps to EnterpriseAlignment1. Determine Vision2. Define Mission3. Develop Strategies4. Set Goals5. Plan Business Portfolio6. Establish Policies and Procedures7. Create Processes and Activities8. Assign Resources and Assets9. Build Products and Services10. Fulfill Customer Needs11. Drive Operational Excellence12. Communicate ResultsCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 14September 23, So
  15. 15. Project ManagementBody of Knowledge (PMBOK) Integration Management Scope Management Time Management Cost Management Quality Management Human Resource Management Communication Management Risk Management Procurement ManagementCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 15September 23, So
  16. 16. The Missing Piece Organizational Change Management (OCM)  The people side of the project  Prepares the people affected by the project to accept and, when required, to become committed to the change and often even look forward to it.Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 16September 23, So
  17. 17. OCM Define the level of resistance to change and prepare a plan to offset resistance Define roles and responsibilities Develop competencies Establish burning platform Transform the user communityCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 17September 23, So
  18. 18. S.T.A.R.S. Scope Tasks Acceptance Resources ScheduleCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 18September 23, So
  19. 19. Project Collaboration Web • Email • Voice • FAX • Chat • Wireless • On-demand collaboration configuration Multi-media Integration • Multi-source encapsulation of business information Messaging Manager • Instant and self- managed customer and Portal Manager partner portalsConfigurator Analyzer • Inter and Intra enterprise availability Central Repository • Fully instrumented collaborations with built- Knowledge Manager in reporting • Integration with Collaboration Engine enterprise communication systems and applications Application & Doc I/F • Scalable to Fortune 100 and global portal levels XML • SOAP • EAI • API’s • ODBCCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 19September 23, So
  20. 20. Project Resource Center • Engagement is monitored by key stakeholders • Full project financials are available on-line • Customer and consultant resourcesHosted project teams (hoteling concept) work in optimal workspaces Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 • Project infrastructure available on day-1 with no delays • Collaboration technology allows off- site development Consultant Pool • Consultants are Dedicated and optimized across Shared projects Resources • Customer resources optimize their time working on project Hosted project environments • Instant deployment • No project disruption due to infrastructure • Complete life-cycle support • Production migration Dev Test StageUpgrade DR and disaster recovery Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 20September 23, So
  21. 21. Project Infrastructure HostingCustomer Premises (or their own co-lo) Production server is a “node” of the overall grid for ease of image management and overall software deployment.Hosting Facility Image factory holds all applications and system software. Specific server Server grid accommodates multiple images are environments with the same built by the infrastructure. Automation facilitates factory. deployment and reconfiguration with minimal effort.Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 21September 23, So
  22. 22. Service Delivery Model New Install Demo Testing Production and and and Evaluation Training Support Configuration Conversion and and Development Staging Software is Testing and training Final hosted and environments are production available for created on the fly environment is customer to try and available to created atimmediately for a customer customer’s period of time site with copy/paste Target image is Data conversion operation loaded and project environments resulting in no starts. No and final stage delays environment environment are delays of any kind. available immediately Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 22September 23, So
  23. 23. Service Delivery Model Installed Base Production Upgrade and Disaster Conversion Support Recovery & Staging Development Upgrade and Evaluation & Test Testing Software is A DR environment Newsupported in can be made environment desired available is created to customer synchronized with stageenvironment production migration to Dev/test environment new software environment is version Vendor upgrades hosted and can be are made easily changed available to based on customer via customer needs. evaluation All customer environment images are stored. Copyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 23September 23, So
  24. 24. “The best time to stop a projectthat you don’t know is going to besuccessful is when you start it.” John Carrow CIO, Unisys CorporationCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 24September 23, So
  25. 25. Contact InformationTim Salavertsalaver@danasoftwareinc.comSVP, Chief Products OfficerDana Software, Inc381 Stockton AveSan Jose, CA 95126(408) 279-3838 Main(408) 535-4337 Officewww.danasoftwareinc.com Dr. H. James Harrington hjh@harrington-institute.com CEO Harrington Institute 16080 Camino del Cerro, #100 Los Gatos, CA 95032 (408) 358-2476 www.harrington-institute.comCopyright © 2003 H. James Harrington and Tim Salaver, Dana200 25September 23, So

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