The Rise and Fall and Rise of Java

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The Java ecosystem, long a bastion of stability in an otherwise volatile industry, has been unusually challenged of late.

Roiled by Oracle's litigation of Google, churned with the news that IBM decommited from Harmony in favor of OpenJDK and lately has been under attack from analysts. It many respects, the unrest couldn't have come at a worse time, as developer attention and focus is fragmenting under a constant stream of platform, language and framework fragmentation. What does this mean for free software developers?

We'll explore and unpack the recent events, and evaluate likely scenarios moving forward with an eye towards the implications of Java on the free software community, including the future of Java the language and Java the platform. This will include relevant metrics vis-a-vis developer attention and strategy, as well as an examination of projects important to the ecosystem.

http://fosdem.org/2011/schedule/event/riseandfall

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The Rise and Fall and Rise of Java

  1. 1. The Rise and Fall and Rise of Java10.20.2005February 2010
  2. 2. http://redmonk.com/public/fosdem.pdf 2
  3. 3. The Rise 3
  4. 4. The History Soure: Tiobe Programming Community Index 4
  5. 5. The Fall 5
  6. 6. The Decline 6
  7. 7. The Analysts 7
  8. 8. Forresters Mike Gualtieri 8
  9. 9. Forresters John Rymer 9
  10. 10. The Events 10
  11. 11. vs11
  12. 12. What developers were asking us in 2010 Soure: RedMonk Analytics 12
  13. 13. vs13
  14. 14. Language Fragmentation 14
  15. 15. The Rise 15
  16. 16. +16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20
  21. 21. Java Mentions on Open Source List Traffic Soure: MarkMail 21
  22. 22. 22
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. 24
  25. 25. Has Java Peaked? 25
  26. 26. Yes 26
  27. 27. But everything is relative 27
  28. 28. The evidence simply does notsupport the claim that Java is a “dead end” 28
  29. 29. Java is no longer as popular 29
  30. 30. What Java is is the most popular 30
  31. 31. QUESTIONS 31

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