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Crowd manufacturing and production management as a service
 

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Crowd-manufacturing and production management as a service

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  • As previously discussed, many factories or industries create and operate in neworks in order to achive low costs, higher flexibility and greater adaptability to both internal and external factors. As a consequence, subcontracting has become very common in many enterprises at all levels of the supply chain, from OEM ’ s to suppliers. These factors are leading towards the virtualization of the enterprise, as many exisitng software tools are ready to assist this trend, such as: Supply Chain Planning Warehouse Management System - Manufacturing Execution Systems and Material Resource Planning - Transportation Management Systems
  • Despite the variety of software tools, full B2B integration of supplier is still a difficult task at the moment. According to EADS, the A380 program was delayed partially due to the heterogeneity of the PLM tools used inside Airbus, with important economic impact. This led to an important PLM harmonization project inside the EADS Group. It also led to the creation of an eBusiness PLM standards governance group for the whole Aerospace & Defense community, as the “ digital break “ problem is not Airbus specific, but shared by all the Aerospace eBusiness ecosystem, as illustrated by the objective of SEINE project. Third bullet: “ On Boarding ” , for such platforms, could be defined as the process of acquiring the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviours to effectively and efficiently participate in a partnership. Considering the whole lifecycle of a Virtual Enterprise, some more tools can be recognized and should be kept in mind, such as: Product Data Management Product Lifecycle Management Simulation Lifecycle Management Maintenance and Reparation Operations - Factory Lifecycle Management)
  • Often, the high cost of commercial software tools prohibits SMEs from adopting them, but developments in Open standards, advances in web service technologies, Service-Oriented Architecture and Cloud Computing have aided in reducing these costs. However, there are more difficulties towards a global solution, such as: Established use of manual approaches Lack of real-time access to warehouse and other data Avoidance of loosely coupled partnerships Security and confidentiality of IT solutions IMAGINE has identified the difficulties and aims to tackle the aforementioned issues by incorporating modern, yet mature, methodologies and tools.
  • Current manufacturing practices are comprised of siloed point solutions which offer no global visibility, no timely reaction to problems & changes, and no easy entry points for SMEs. Network manufacturing partners should operate towards a shared manufacturing goal, which provides management of manufacturing processes and isibility over design and manufacturing at the network level.
  • A DMN is defined as a coalition, either permanent or temporal, comprising production systems of geographically dispersed Small and Medium Enterprises and/or Original Equipment that collaborate in a shared value-chain to conduct joint manufacturing. The notion of a DMN includes the configuration of a network consisting of a large number of closely integrated and interdependent projects, which are executed over a wide geographic spread, across very different time zones, and involve large numbers of staff. This whole process, apart from being very difficult to be executed, affects also a wide range of stakeholders whether they are members of the network or not.
  • The benefits of deploying DMN ’ s can be grouped into 3 major categories: - Time savings - Cost Reduction - Operations Enhancement

Crowd manufacturing and production management as a service Crowd manufacturing and production management as a service Presentation Transcript

  • Dr. Sotiris Koussouris Decision Support Systems Laboratory National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) skous@me.com 2013 IEEE International Technology Management Conference & 19th ICE Conference 25 June 2013, The Hague Crowd-Manufacturing and Production Management as a Service (the IMAGINE scope)
  • IMAGINE Innovative End-to-end Management of Dynamic Manufacturing Networks • http://www.imagine-futurefactory.eu • IP Project, co-funded by the European Union under the Virtual Factories and Enterprises theme (FoF-ICT-2011.7.3, Grant Agreement No: 285132) • Project start: September 2011 • Duration: 36 months • 14 different organisations from 10 different countries
  • • Cost and production rates were the most important performance criteria in manufacturing in the last decades • In order to achieve economies of scale, manufacturers relied on dedicated mass production systems. • However, as living standards improve, the era of mass production is being replaced by the era of market niches. Image: http://cp.media.mit.edu/research/76-environmental-impacts-of-mass-customization Customisation is Key
  • In response to the increasing need for customization, companies formVirtual Enterprises (VEs) In aVE, a company assembles a temporary consortium of partners and services for a certain purpose: • temporary special request • an ongoing goal to fulfill orders • an attempt to take advantage of a new resource or market niche Advantages ofVEs: • reduce both costs and time to market • increase flexibility • gain access to new markets and resources • Redefine Business Scope and Roles Large companies or organizations, participating in aVE, focus on their core competencies and mission critical operations, outsourcing everything else to partners. TowardsVEs
  • Factories/Industries operate in networks in order to achieve: • Low cost • High flexibility • Adaptability to all (internal and external) factors Subcontracting is a very common option for all enterprises • In every tier of the supply chain, from OEMs to suppliers Software tools are already there, ready to assist this trend: • SCP (Supply Chain Planning) • WMS (Warehouse Management System) • MES/MRP (Manufacturing Execution Systems / Material Resource Planning) • TMS (Transportation Management Systems) • Etc… Image: http://www.mjc2.com/Frameset_products_manufacturing.htm Current Practices (1/3)
  • But..... •Full B2B integration of suppliers is a difficult task at the moment •Poor planning and integration of eCommerce and ERP systems cost huge amounts of time and money •The high cost of commercial software tools prohibits SMEs from adopting them •“On boarding” processes, that are of outmost importance, are nowadays too slow, both in specification and implementation level Considering the whole lifecycle of aVirtual Enterprise, several tools can be recognised and should be kept in mind: •PDM (Product Data Management) •PLM solutions (Product Lifecycle Management) •SLM (Simulation Lifecycle Management) •MRO (Maintenance and Reparation Operations) •FLM (Factory Lifecycle Management) Current Practices (2/3)
  • Costs can be reduced by taking advantage of new approaches, like: •Open standards •Advances in web service technologies •Service Oriented Architecture •Cloud Computing More difficulties exist towards a global solution •Established use of manual approaches •Lack of real-time access to warehouse and other data •Avoidance of loosely coupled partnerships •Security of IT solutions and confidentiality of information IMAGINE has identified the difficulties and aims to tackle the aforementioned issues by incorporating modern, yet mature, methodologies and tools Current Practices (3/3)
  • Current manufacturing practices are comprised of silo-ed point solutions •No global visibility •No timely reaction to problems & changes •No easy entry points for SMEs Network manufacturing partners should operate towards a shared manufacturing goal: •Management of manufacturing processes at network level •Visibility over design and manufacturing at network level Drawbacks in Network Manufacturing
  • A DMN is defined as a coalition, either permanent or temporal, comprising production systems of geographically dispersed Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and/or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) that collaborate in a shared value-chain to conduct joint manufacturing. The notion of a DMN includes: • The configuration of a network consisting of a large number of closely integrated and interdependent entities/projects, which are executed over a wide geographic spread, across very different time zones, and involve large numbers of staff. This whole process, apart from being very difficult to be executed, affects also a wide range of stakeholders whether they are members of the network or not. Dynamic Manufacturing Networks
  • •Relies on end-to-end integrated ICT solutions that effectively enable the management of networked manufacturing supply chains •Is market-oriented with focus on value chain streamlining and support for innovative business models End-to-end management of DMNEnd-to-end management of DMN Production Project •O1.1 • O1.1.1 • O1.1.2 •O1.2 • O1.2 Planning Manufacture DeliverSourcing SC1 SC1 SC2 SC2 SC4 SC4 SC5 SC5 SC3 SC3 SC6 SC6 DesignConfigure Monitor & Manage blueprint blueprint blueprint blueprint Collaboration platform & Information Bus CRM ERP SPC WMS APS LIMS IMAGINE DMN Framework
  • An innovative flexible service engineering methodology that supports and guides developers when developing large-scale, complex manufacturing applications on integrated collaborative manufacturing management systems Monitoring & Management Suite Simulation Production Integration Bus CRM ERP SPC WMS APS LIMS Partner Blueprint Repository Manufacturing Blueprint Repository Quality Assurance Blueprint End-to-end Production Process Repository End-to-End Manufacturing Design Suite Network Configuration Blueprint Customizer Profile Selector Profile Composer Simulation Network Configuration Monitor Compliance Assurance IMAGINE DMN Framework Lifecycle
  • Time Savings •Time-to-market reduction •Optimized design of end products & individual components •Collaborative product development •Network-optimised production planning & scheduling •Fast selection of suppliers for each project/product & network setup •Instant reconfiguration of the suppliers’ network •Automated communication & data exchange with suppliers/clients & partners •Increased visibility and access speed to network/manufacturing data Cost Reduction •Cost-optimised selection of suppliers •Cutting down inventory costs •Cost-optimised management of resources •Reducing marketing expenses Operations’ Enhancement •Focus on core competences •Product/Services co-creation •Cost/risk sharing with partners •Monitoring of product development & manufacturing operations •Reduction of design & production flaws •Optimal selection of suppliers & collaborators •Improved quality throughout the complete product lifecycle •Know-how exchange, shared knowledge management & access to new technologies •Access to new customers/markets •Integrate diverse enterprise IT systems for better, holistic & efficient production DMN Benefits (for OEMS and Suppliers also)
  • SME SME SME SME SME SME SME SME SME SME SME SMEs are typically on the bottom of the “production pyramid” What’s the roles of SMEs ?
  • Surviving chances are poor....
  • The Pyramid Inverse
  • Crowd Sourcing “The practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, and especially from an online community, rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.” Wikipedia 2013
  • Crowd(Sourced) Manufacturing Virtual Alliances of SMEs /Suppliers to develop and deliver added-value products/services
  • • The aforementioned drawbacks hinder SMEs from building their own networks! • Production Management as a Service (PMaaS) is a step towards allowing a more collaborative, reliable, coherent, trustful and productive coalition/alliance. PM as a Service
  • IMAGINE and its Contribution to PMaaS • Interoperability between SME systems • Easy On-Boarding Mechanism • Search and Retrieve “real-time” information about potential partners • Quality- Assurance of Partners Operations • Optimisation for Network Configuration • Active Monitoring of Network Operations
  • So the story could change 
  • Thank you for your attention Dr. Sotiris Koussouris Decision Support Systems Laboratory National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) eMail: skous@me.com Twitter: @skous www.imagine-futurefactory.eu