The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring
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The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring

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HR professionals reported slightly improved financial health in 2012 compared with 2011. One-half (51%) of organizations reported a mild to significant improvement compared to 12 months ago (42% in ...

HR professionals reported slightly improved financial health in 2012 compared with 2011. One-half (51%) of organizations reported a mild to significant improvement compared to 12 months ago (42% in 2011), whereas one-quarter (27%) were in a mild or significant decline (34% in 2011).

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The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring Presentation Transcript

  • SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of theRecession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring March 12, 2013
  • Introduction• This is Part 1 of a series of SHRM survey results about the ongoing impact of the U.S. and global recession, which began in 2007. Overall results will be reported separately in three different topic areas:  Overall financial health and hiring.  Recruiting and skill gaps.  Global competition and hiring strategies.• New for 2012, overall results will also be reported separately for California.• Industry-specific results will be reported separately for each of the eight industries that were included in the sample:  Construction, oil, mining and gas.  Federal government.  Finance.  Health.  High-tech.  Manufacturing.  Professional services.  State and local government. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 2
  • Key Findings: Organizations’ Financial Health• What percentage of staff have organizations lost since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007? Overall, three-quarters (76%) of organizations indicated they had lost 10% or fewer employees since the recession began. Twenty-nine percent of those organizations had not lost any employees.  Results were similar to 2011, although both in 2012 and 2011 organizations reported fewer job losses compared with 2010.  The health and finance industries reported the fewest layoffs, with 40% and 37%, respectively, losing no staff.• What percentage of staff have organizations lost in the last 12 months? One-half (49%) of organizations lost no staff in the past year, and one-third (33%) reported losing up to 5% of employees.  Smaller organizations were more likely to have lost no employees compared with larger organizations.  All industries faired better than the federal government (27%) in terms of having lost no employees in the last 12 months.• How does the financial health of organizations compare to 12 months ago? Overall financial health reported in 2012 was slightly better than it was in 2011. One-half (51%) of organizations reported a mild to significant improvement (42% in 2011), whereas one- quarter (27%) were in a mild or significant decline (34% in 2011). The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 3
  • Key Findings: Hiring• Are organizations currently hiring? Over three-quarters (78%) of organizations hired full-time employees in 2012, a slight increase from 73% in 2011. Fewer organizations hired part-time employees (38%) or full-time temporary/contract (37%) positions, and one-quarter (26%) hired part-time temporary/contract employees.  Larger organizations (500 to 24,999 employees) were more likely to be hiring compared with smaller organizations (1 to 499 employees).  Hiring for full-time contract/temporary employees was the highest for the federal government (51%), high-tech (51%) and manufacturing (45%) industries compared with other industries.• For what type of positions are organizations hiring? Most organizations hired at nonmanagement levels (71% for hourly and 70% for salaried positions), and one-half (49%) hired for management positions such as directors and managers. One out of five organizations (20%) hired at the executive/upper-management (e.g., CEO, CFO) level.  These findings are very similar to what was found in 2011.  The health industry had the highest percentage of organizations hiring for nonmanagement hourly (91%) positions, and the high-tech industry was highest for nonmanagement salaried (95%) positions. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 4
  • Key Findings: Creating Completely New Positions• Are organizations creating new positions or replacing jobs lost? Of those organizations hiring, over one-half (57%) mainly hired direct replacements of jobs lost, whereas 31% hired for completely new positions. Eleven percent of organizations added new duties to the jobs lost.  Although there were no changes from 2011, both 2012 and 2011 showed a decrease in hiring for new positions and an increase in hiring direct replacements of jobs lost compared with 2010.  Smaller organizations (1 to 499 employees) were more likely to be hiring for completely new positions than were larger organizations (500 or more employees).  State or local governments (76%) were more likely than all other nongovernment industries to be hiring direct replacements of jobs lost.  The high-tech (53%); professional services (44%); and construction, mining, oil and gas (40%) industries had the highest percentage of organizations that were hiring for completely new positions compared with health, federal government, and state and local government industries. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 5
  • Key Findings: Skills for Completely New Positions• Do completely new positions require new and different skill sets?  Compared with the skills required for the jobs lost since the recession began:  One in five organizations (19%) required completely new and different skill sets.  Over one-half (58%) of organizations required a mixture of new skills and the same type of skills for new positions.  About one-quarter (23%) required approximately the same types of skills as those required before the recession.  Compared with the skills required in existing jobs in your organization (for organizations that had not lost any jobs since the recession began):  Few organizations (5%) required completely new and different skills.  About one-half (54%) of open positions required a mixture of new skills and the same types of skills.  Two in five organizations (42%) required approximately the same types of skills.• Is it difficult to recruit for positions requiring new and different skill sets? Three in five (63%) organizations reported it was somewhat or very difficult to recruit for completely new positions or positions with new duties added that required new and different skill sets. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 6
  • What do these results mean to the HR profession?• Staffing for replacement needs: In the coming years, HR professionals are likely to be staffing for replacement needs more than filling newly created positions. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) 2010-2020 Employment Project Report, slower population growth will lead to a decreasing overall labor force from 2010 to 2020. It projects 54.8 million total job openings in this time period with more than half—61.6 percent—resulting from ―replacement needs‖, i.e., the need to replace workers who retire or otherwise permanently leave an occupation. Replacement needs will exceed new job growth vacancies in 4 out of 5 occupations.• Increasing productivity: Some industries are using fewer employees to do more with less, possibly resulting in employee burnout and turnover. The federal government in particular was most likely to have lost jobs.• Improving financial health: HR professionals reported slightly improved financial health in 2012, and economists are expecting continuing incremental economic growth in 2013. With over one-half (51%) of organizations reporting mild to significant improvement, organizations may be more likely to add jobs in 2013 than in previous years if economic conditions continue to improve.• Investing in training and upskilling: With a mix of new and different skill sets required for most new openings and a slower growing labor force, HR professionals and organizations may need to invest more in training and employee upskilling. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 7
  • Since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)? 29% 2012 (n = 3,236) 0% of staff 31% 2011 (n = 2,273) 29% 1% to 5% of staff 28% 2010 (n = 2,342) 18% 6% to 10% of staff 18%10% or fewer staff (2012 & 2011 data) 76% 77% *Less than 10% of staff (2010 data) 65%11% to 20% of staff (2012 & 2011 data) 13% 12% * 10% to 20% of staff (2010 data) 22% 8% 21% to 50% of staff 9% 11% 2% More than 50% of staff 3% 2%Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. An asterisk (*) indicates that 2010 data had different categories than2012 and 2011 data: “Less than 10% of staff” and “10% to 20% of staff.” The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 8
  • Since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)?Comparisons by industry• The finance and health industries are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; federal government;manufacturing; and state or local government industries to have lost 0% of staff since the U.S. and global recessionbegan in December 2007. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (25%) Finance (37%) Federal government (22%) > Health (40%) Manufacturing (25%) State or local government (22%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 9
  • Since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 1 to 499 employees are less likely than organizations with 500 or more employees to haveencountered any staff losses since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007.• Organizations with 1 to 99 employees are less likely than organizations with 100 to 499 employees to have encounteredany staff losses since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007. Comparisons by organization staff size: Percentage of organizations that lost 0% of staff 1 to 99 employees (40%) 500 to 2,499 employees (22%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (22%) 100 to 499 employees (29%) 25,000 or more employees (13%) 1 to 99 employees (40%) > 100 to 499 employees (29%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 10
  • In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)? 0% of staff 49% 1% to 5% of staff 33% 6% to 10% of staff 10% 11% to 20% of staff 5% 21% to 50% of staff 2% More than 50% of staff 1%n = 3,277 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 11
  • In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)?Comparisons by industry• The construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; health; high-tech; manufacturing; professional services; and state or localgovernment industries are more likely than the federal government to have lost 0% of staff in the last 12 months. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (47%) Finance (56%) Health (55%) High-tech (47%) > Federal government (27%) Manufacturing (52%) Professional services (48%) State or local government (47%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 12
  • In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, what percentage of regular full-time jobs at your organization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 1 to 99 employees are more likely than organizations with 100 or more employees to have lost 0% ofstaff in the last 12 months.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 2,500 or more employees to have lost0% of staff in the last 12 months.• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 25,000 or more employees to havelost 0% of staff in the last 12 months. Comparisons by organization staff size 100 to 499 employees (51%) 500 to 2,499 employees (44%) 1 to 99 employees (62%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (39%) 25,000 or more employees (29%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (39%) 100 to 499 employees (51%) > 25,000 or more employees (29%) 500 to 2,499 employees (44%) > 25,000 or more employees (29%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 13
  • Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organization’s overall financial health is improving, has not changed or is declining? 13%Significant improvement 9% 7% 38% Mild improvement 33% 35% 2012 (n = 3,362) 2011 (n = 2,277) 22% No change 24% 2010 (n = 2,333) 25% 20% Mild decline 26% 24% 7% Significant decline 8% 9% The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 14
  • Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organization’s overall financial health is improving, has not changed or is declining?Comparisons by industry• The construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; health; high-tech; manufacturing; and professional services industries aremore likely than the federal government and state or local government to have seen significant improvement in theirorganization’s financial health compared to 12 months ago.• The finance industry is more likely than the health industry to have seen significant improvement in its organization’sfinancial health compared to 12 months ago. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (16%) Finance (19%) Health (11%) Federal government (3%) > High-tech (17%) State or local government (4%) Manufacturing (17%) Professional services (17%) Finance (19%) > Health (11%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 15
  • Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organization’s overall financial health is improving, has not changed or is declining?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 1 to 99 employees and 2,500 and more employees are more likely than organizations with 100 to 499employees to have seen significant decline in their organization’s financial health compared to 12 months ago. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (8%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (9%) > 100 to 499 employees (4%) 25,000 or more employees (10%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 16
  • Is your organization currently hiring for any of the following types of staff? 78% Full-time staff 73% 62% 38% *Part-time staff 2012 (n = 3,480-3,481) 2011 (n = 2,286) 37% 2010 (n = 2,308) *Full-time contract/temporary 26% *Part-time contract/temporaryNote: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. An asterisk (*) indicates this question was not asked in2010 or 2011. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 17
  • Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-time staff?Comparisons by industry• The health and high-tech industries are more likely than the professional services industry to be currently hiring full-timestaff.• The health industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas industry to be currently hiring full-time staff. Comparisons by industry Health (85%) > Professional services (72%) High-tech (83%) Health (85%) > Construction, mining, oil and gas (73%)• The health industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; federal government; finance; high-tech;manufacturing; professional services; and state or local government industries to be currently hiring part-time staff. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (18%) Federal government (35%) Finance (53%) Health (69%) > High-tech (17%) Manufacturing (15%) Professional services (27%) State or local government (51%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 18
  • Is your organization currently hiring part-time staff? (continued)Comparisons by industry• The finance industry and state or local governments are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; federalgovernment; high-tech; manufacturing; and professional services industries to be currently hiring part-time staff.• The federal government is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; high-tech; and manufacturingindustries to be currently hiring part-time staff.• The professional services industry is more likely than the manufacturing industry to be currently hiring part-time staff. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (18%) Federal government (35%) Finance (53%) > High-tech (17%) State or local government (51%) Manufacturing (15%) Professional services (27%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (18%) Federal government (35%) > High-tech (17%) Manufacturing (15%) Professional services (27%) > Manufacturing (15%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 19
  • Is your organization currently hiring full-time contract/temporary staff?Comparisons by industry• The federal government and high-tech industry are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; finance;health; professional services; and state or local government industries to be currently hiring full-time contract/temporarystaff.• The manufacturing industry is more likely than the finance, health, professional services, and state or local governmentindustries to be currently hiring full-time contract/temporary staff. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (35%) Finance (26%) Federal government (51%) > Health (34%) High-tech (51%) Professional services (34%) State or local government (35%) Finance (26%) Health (34%) Manufacturing (45%) > Professional services (34%) State or local government (35%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 20
  • Is your organization currently hiring part-time contract/temporary staff?Comparisons by industry• State or local governments are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; high-tech;manufacturing; and professional services industries to be currently hiring part-time contract/temporary staff.• The federal government and health industries are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; andmanufacturing industries to be currently hiring part-time contract/temporary staff.• The professional services industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas industry to be currently hiringpart-time contract/temporary staff. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (14%) Finance (17%) State or local government (39%) > High-tech (24%) Manufacturing (17%) Professional services (25%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (14%) Federal government (32%) > Finance (17%) Health (33%) Manufacturing (17%) Professional services (25%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (14%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 21
  • Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-time staff?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring full-time staff.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99employees to be currently hiring full-time staff. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (90%) 1 to 99 employees (56%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (91%) 100 to 499 employees (81%) 100 to 499 employees (81%) > 1 to 99 employees (56%) 25,000 or more employees (88%)• Organizations with 500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring part-time staff.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currently hiringpart-time staff. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (50%) 1 to 99 employees (18%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (54%) > 100 to 499 employees (36%) 25,000 or more employees (57%) 100 to 499 employees (36%) > 1 to 99 employees (18%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 22
  • Is your organization currently hiring full-time contract/temporary staff?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 2,500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 2,499 employees to be currentlyhiring full-time contract/temporary staff.• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring full-time contract/temporary staff.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currently hiringfull-time contract/temporary staff. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (16%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (59%) > 100 to 499 employees (30%) 25,000 or more employees (64%) 500 to 2,499 employees (47%) 1 to 99 employees (16%) 500 to 2,499 employees (47%) > 100 to 499 employees (30%) 100 to 499 employees (30%) > 1 to 99 employees (16%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 23
  • Is your organization currently hiring part-time contract/temporary staff?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 2,500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 2,499 employees to be currentlyhiring part-time contract/temporary staff.• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring part-time contract/temporary staff.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currently hiringpart-time contract/temporary staff. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (12%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (41%) > 100 to 499 employees (21%) 25,000 or more employees (45%) 500 to 2,499 employees (33%) 1 to 99 employees (12%) 500 to 2,499 employees (33%) > 100 to 499 employees (21%) 100 to 499 employees (21%) > 1 to 99 employees (12%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 24
  • At what level(s) is your organization hiring full-time regular staff? Nonmanagement 71% hourly employees 72% Nonmanagement 70% salaried employees 71% 2012 (n = 2,722) 2011 (n = 1,660) Management 49% (e.g., directors, managers) 54% Executive/upper management 20% (e.g., CEO, CFO) 22%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple-response options. Only respondents whose organizations were currentlyhiring full-time regular staff were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 25
  • Is your organization hiring nonmanagement, hourly employees?Comparisons by industry• The health industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; federal government; finance; high-tech;manufacturing; professional services; and state or local government industries to be hiring nonmanagement, hourlyemployees.• The construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; manufacturing; and state or local government industries are more likelythan the federal government, high-tech and professional services industries to be hiring nonmanagement, hourlyemployees. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (78%) Federal government (46%) Finance (77%) Health (91%) > High-tech (42%) Manufacturing (77%) Professional services (52%) State or local government (78%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (78%) Federal government (46%) Finance (77%) > High-tech (42%) Manufacturing (77%) Professional services (52%) State or local government (78%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 26
  • Is your organization hiring nonmanagement, salaried employees?Comparisons by industry• The high-tech industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; federal government; finance; health;manufacturing; professional services; and state or local government industries to be hiring nonmanagement, salariedemployees.• The federal government and the professional services industry are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas;finance; health; manufacturing; and state or local government industries to be hiring nonmanagement, salariedemployees. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (67%) Federal government (83%) Finance (68%) High-tech (95%) > Health (59%) Manufacturing (66%) Professional services (81%) State or local government (62%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (67%) Finance (68%) Federal government (83%) > Health (59%) Professional services (81%) Manufacturing (66%) State or local government (62%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 27
  • Is your organization hiring executive/upper management employees?Comparisons by industry• State or local governments are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; manufacturing; and professionalservices industries to be hiring executive/upper management employees.• The federal government and the high-tech industry are more likely than the manufacturing and professional servicesindustries to be hiring executive/upper management employees.• The health industry is more likely than the manufacturing industry to be hiring executive/upper managementemployees. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (15%) State or local government (25%) > Manufacturing (14%) Professional services (14%) Federal government (27%) Manufacturing (14%) > High-tech (26%) Professional services (14%) Health (23%) > Manufacturing (14%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 28
  • Is your organization currently hiring nonmanagement, hourly or salaried employees?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring nonmanagement, hourly employees.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99employees to be currently hiring nonmanagement, hourly employees. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (79%) 1 to 99 employees (54%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (78%) 100 to 499 employees (71%) 100 to 499 employees (71%) > 1 to 99 employees (54%) 25,000 or more employees (76%)• Organizations with 500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to be currentlyhiring nonmanagement, salaried employees. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (78%) 1 to 99 employees (60%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (84%) > 100 to 499 employees (59%) 25,000 or more employees (83%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 29
  • Is your organization currently hiring other management (e.g., directors, managers) employees?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 2,499 employees to becurrently hiring other management employees.• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to499 employees to be currently hiring other management employees.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currently hiringother management employees. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (24%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (73%) > 100 to 499 employees (39%) 500 to 2,499 employees (57%) 500 to 2,499 employees (57%) 1 to 99 employees (24%) > 25,000 or more employees (69%) 100 to 499 employees (39%) 100 to 499 employees (39%) > 1 to 99 employees (24%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 30
  • Is your organization currently hiring executive/upper management employees?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 2,499 employees to becurrently hiring executive/upper management employees.• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to499 employees to be currently hiring executive/upper management employees.• Organizations with 100 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currently hiringexecutive/upper management employees. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (7%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (33%) > 100 to 499 employees (13%) 500 to 2,499 employees (24%) 500 to 2,499 employees (24%) 1 to 99 employees (7%) > 25,000 or more employees (34%) 100 to 499 employees (13%) 100 to 499 employees (13%) > 1 to 99 employees (7%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 31
  • Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature of full-time, regular positions your organization is currently hiring? 57% Direct replacements of jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since 58% the recession began 41% 31% 2012 (n = 2,665) 2011 (n = 1,640) Completely new positions 30% 2010 (n = 1,378) 47% 11% New duties added to jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since 12% the recession began 12%Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. Only respondents whose organizations were currently hiring full-time,regular staff were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 32
  • Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature of full-time, regular positions your organization is currently hiring for jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began?Comparisons by industry• State or local governments are more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; finance; health; high-tech;manufacturing; and professional services industries to be hiring direct replacements of jobs lost.• The health industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; high-tech; manufacturing; and professionalservices industries to be hiring direct replacements of jobs lost.• The finance and manufacturing industries are more likely than the high-tech industry to be hiring direct replacements ofjobs lost. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (47%) Finance (55%) Health (64%) State or local government (76%) > High-tech (34%) Manufacturing (53%) Professional services (46%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (47%) High-tech (34%) Health (64%) > Manufacturing (53%) Professional services (46%) Finance (55%) > High-tech (34%) Manufacturing (53%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 33
  • Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature of full-time, regular positions your organization is currently hiring for jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began?Comparisons by industry• The high-tech industry is more likely than the federal government; finance; health; manufacturing; and state or localgovernment industries to be hiring completely new positions.• The construction, mining, oil and gas industry and the professional services industry are more likely than the federalgovernment, health, and state or local government industries to be hiring completely new positions.• The finance industry is more likely than the federal and state or local governments to be hiring completely new positions. Comparisons by industry Federal government (21%) Finance (36%) High-tech (53%) > Health (27%) Manufacturing (32%) State or local government (14%) Federal government (21%) Construction, mining, oil and gas (40%) > Health (27%) Professional services (44%) State or local government (14%) Federal government (21%) Finance (36%) > State or local government (14%) Health (27%) > State or local government (14%) Manufacturing (32%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 34
  • Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature of full-time, regular positions your organization is currently hiring for jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began?Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to499 employees to be hiring direct replacements of jobs lost.• Organizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees be hiring directreplacements of jobs lost. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (63%) 1 to 99 employees (49%) > 25,000 or more employees (67%) 100 to 499 employees (55%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (62%) > 1 to 99 employees (49%)• Organizations with 1 to 499 employees are more likely than organizations with 500 or more employees to be hiringcompletely new positions. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (25%) 1 to 99 employees (42%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (23%) 100 to 499 employees (36%) 25,000 or more employees (18%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 35
  • Compared with the skills required for jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began in December 2007, do these completely new full-time, regular positions require: 58% A mixture of new skills and the same types of skills 57% 23% 2012 (n = 391) Approximately the same types of skills 28% 2011 (n = 467) 19% Completely new and different skills 15%Note: Only respondents whose organizations had lost jobs since the recession began in December 2007 and were hiring full-time staff for “completely new positions” were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 36
  • Compared with the skills required for jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began in December 2007, do these completely new full-time, regular positions require:Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees and 2,500 to 24,999employees to be requiring approximately the same types of skills as those required in the jobs lost since the recessionbegan. Comparisons by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (10%) 500 to 2,499 employees (37%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (15%)• Organizations with 1 to 99 employees are more likely than organizations with 500 to 24,999 employees to be requiringcompletely new and different skills compared to the skills required in the jobs lost since the recession began. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (12%) 1 to 99 employees (35%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (11%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 37
  • Compared with the skills required in existing jobs in your organization, do these completely new full-time, regular positions require: A mixture of new skills and 54% the same types of skills Approximately the 42% same types of skills Completely new and 5% different skillsNote: n = 437. Percentages do not total 100% due to rounding. Only respondents whose organizations had not lost jobs sincethe recession began in December 2007 and were hiring full-time staff for “completely new positions” were asked thisquestion. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 38
  • For the new full-time, regular positions being created by your organization that require new and different skill sets, how easy or difficult do you think it will be or has it been thus far to find qualified individuals for those positions? 4% Very easy 5% 16% 33% Somewhat easy 32% 2012 (n = 852) 45% 2011 (n = 528) 53% 2010 (n = 749) Somewhat difficult 56% 36% 10% Very difficult 7% 3%Note: Only respondents whose organizations were hiring full-time staff for positions with “new duties added to jobs lost” or“completely new positions” that required either “a mixture of new skills and the same types of skills” or “completely new anddifferent skills” were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 39
  • For the new full-time, regular positions being created by your organization that require new and different skill sets, how easy or difficult do you think it will be or has been thus far to find qualified individuals for those positions?Comparisons by industry• The health industry is more likely than the construction, mining, oil and gas; high-tech; manufacturing; and professionalservices industries to indicate it will be or has been somewhat easy to find qualified individuals for new full-time positions.• State or local governments are more likely than the manufacturing industry to indicate it will be or has been somewhateasy to find qualified individuals for new full-time positions. Comparisons by industry Construction, mining, oil and gas (27%) High-tech (23%) Health (54%) > Manufacturing (20%) Professional services (28%) State or local government (40%) > Manufacturing (20%)• The manufacturing industry is more likely than the health industry to indicate it will be or has been somewhat difficult tofind qualified individuals for new full-time positions. Comparisons by industry Manufacturing (63%) > Health (40%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 40
  • DemographicsThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 41
  • Demographics: Organization Industry State or local government 20% Manufacturing 14% Professional services 13% Health 13% Finance 11% Construction, mining, oil and gas 10% High-tech 7% Federal government 7% Other 6%Note: n = 3,481. Percentages do not total 100% due to rounding. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 42
  • Demographics: Organization Sector Privately owned for-profit 43% Government 25% Publicly owned for-profit 17% Nonprofit 12% Other 3%n = 3,294 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 43
  • Demographics: Organization Staff Size 1 to 99 employees 26% 100 to 499 employees 33% 500 to 2,499 employees 19% 2,500 to 24,999 employees 16% 25,000 or more employees 6%n = 3,208 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 44
  • Demographics: OtherDoes your organization have U.S.- Is your organization a single-unit organization orbased operations (business units) only, a multi-unit organization?or does it operate multinationally? Single-unit organization: An organization U.S.-based operations only 76% in which the location and the 36% organization are one and the same. Multinational operations 24% Multi-unit organization: An organization 64% that has more than one location. n = 3,311 n = 3,325 For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies andWhat is the HR department/function for practices determined by the multi-unit headquarters,which you responded throughout this by each work location or by both?survey? Multi-unit headquarters determines HR Corporate (companywide) 68% 50% policies and practices Business unit/division 19% Each work location determines HR 3% policies and practices Facility/location 13% A combination of both the work location n = 2,206 and the multi-unit headquarters 47% determines HR policies and practices n = 2,204 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 45
  • SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and HiringSurvey Methodology• Response rate = 15%• 3,481 HR professionals from a randomly selected sample of SHRM’s membership participated in this survey• Margin of error +/-2%• Survey fielded August 28, 2012 – September 14, 2012 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 46
  • About SHRM Research• For more survey/poll findings, visit www.shrm.org/surveys• For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Services, visit www.shrm.org/customizedresearch• Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_ResearchProject leader: Tanya Mulvey, survey research analyst, SHRM ResearchProject contributors: Alexander Alonso, Ph.D., SPHR, vice president, SHRM Research Evren Esen, manager, Survey Research Center, SHRM Research Jennifer Schramm, GPHR, manager, Workplace Trends and Forecasting, SHRM ResearchCopy editor: Katya Scanlan, SHRM Knowledge Center The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Overall Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 47