2015 Strategic Benefits—Wellness Initiatives

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2015 Strategic Benefits—Wellness Initiatives

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  • 2015 Strategic Benefits—Wellness Initiatives

    1. 1. October 15, 2015 SHRM Survey Findings: 2015 Strategic Benefits— Wellness Initiatives
    2. 2. Introduction The 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey is part of a survey series administered annually since 2012 by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). This research is used to determine whether various employee benefits are leveraged to recruit and retain top talent. The six-part series features the following topics:  Part 1: Wellness Initiatives  Part 2: Flexible Work Arrangements  Part 3: Health Care  Part 4: Leveraging Benefits to Retain Employees  Part 5: Leveraging Benefits to Recruit Employees  Part 6: Assessment and Communication of Benefits Definitions For the purpose of this survey, wellness initiatives are any type of wellness program, resource or service offered to employees. Financial education initiatives are defined as any workplace initiative, program or resource designed to provide employees with information on how to effectively manage their financial resources for a lifetime of financial well-being. 2 Introduction and Definitions 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    3. 3. • Wellness initiatives and use: About two-thirds (69%) of HR professionals indicated their organizations offered some type of wellness program, resource or service to their employees. » Similar to previous years, two-fifths (40%) of HR professionals from organizations that offered some type of wellness program, resource or service indicated their organizations increased their investment in employee wellness initiatives this fiscal year compared with the previous fiscal year. • Return on investment (ROI) and cost-savings from wellness initiatives: In 2014, 72% of organizations that offered some type of wellness program, resource or service did not conduct an analysis to determine their ROI and/or cost-savings for their wellness initiatives; 16% conducted both an ROI and cost-savings analysis, 7% conducted a cost-savings analysis, and 4% conducted an analysis to determine their ROI. • Change in employee participation in wellness initiatives: About one-half (52%) of respondents from organizations that offered some type of wellness program, resource or service indicated employee participation increased last year compared with the year before; the same was true in 2014 (53%), 2013 (56%) and 2012 (54%), indicating a pattern of increased use of wellness initiatives over time. 3 Key Findings 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    4. 4. • Effectiveness of wellness initiatives in reducing health care costs and improving the overall health of employees:More than three-quarters of respondents from organizations that had wellness initiatives in place indicated these initiatives were “somewhat” or “very effective” in reducing the costs of health care (77%); fewer respondents indicated wellness initiatives were not very effective (17%) in reducing the costs of health care compared with 2012 (32%). About four-fifths of respondents (82%) also rated their wellness initiatives as being “somewhat” or “very effective” in improving the physical health of their employees. These findings reveal that overall wellness programs are regarded as more effective in several key areas. • Wellness incentives or rewards: About three-fifths (59%) of organizations that had wellness initiatives in place offered wellness incentives or rewards. » Of respondents from organizations that offered wellness incentives or rewards: • The vast majority (92%) indicated their organization’s incentives were “somewhat” or “very effective” in increasing employee participation; over one-third (36%) indicated they were “very effective,” a statistically significant increase from 2013 (20%). • The most common wellness incentive or reward offered was a reduction in the employee’s health care premium (45%). More than one-third (37%) of respondents indicated their organizations offered gift cards; one-quarter (25%) offered company gift items, such as T-shirts, mugs and gym bags; and one-fifth (20%) offered recognition in a company newsletter, intranet, etc. 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 4 Key Findings (continued)
    5. 5. • Wellness initiatives extended to dependents: Just under one-half (46%) of organizations that had wellness initiatives in place extended them to employee dependents. » Of organizations that extended wellness initiatives to dependents, almost all offered them to spouses (99%), two-thirds (66%) to same-sex partners, and about three-fifths to dependent children (62%) and/or opposite-sex domestic partners (58%). • Alignment of wellness and financial education initiatives: About one-third (32%) of respondents from organizations that had wellness initiatives in place indicated their wellness initiatives were aligned with financial education initiatives, representing an increase from both 2013 and 2012 (19% and 17%, respectively). 5 Key Findings (continued) 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    6. 6. 62015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 What Do These Findings Mean for the HR Profession? • Health care costs are difficult to control for many organizations, which may explain why many have turned to wellness programs as a means of trimming expenses. SHRM’s 2015 Employee Benefits report, for example, showed significant increases from 2011 to 2015 in employers’ participation in a number of preventive health and wellness benefits, including wellness programs (general), health and lifestyle coaching, smoking cessation programs, and rewards or bonuses for completing certain health and wellness programs. If these initiatives result in a healthier workforce, organizations can conceivably see cost savings associated with their health care plans.1 • Aside from cutting costs, wellness programs may also benefit an organization’s recruiting and retention efforts. Almost one quarter (24%) of employees said that wellness programs were a “very important” contributor to job satisfaction, and 54% of those whose organizations offered wellness programs were satisfied with them. Millennial and Generation X employees were most likely to view wellness programs as an important job satisfaction contributor.2 1 2015 Employee Benefits report by SHRM 2 2015 Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement report by SHRM.
    7. 7. Click on "Insert/Header&Footer" and Type Survey Title Here ©SHRM 2013 7 Key Findings Wellness Initiatives
    8. 8. 8 How did your organization’s investment in employee wellness initiatives change in this fiscal year compared with last fiscal year? Does your organization currently offer any types of wellness programs, wellness resources or wellness services to your employees? Note: Response options provided were “yes/no/not sure.” Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Only “yes” responses are shown. 69% 76% 72% 70% Yes 2015 (n = 384, 259) 2014 (n = 348, 262) 2013 (n = 405, 290) 2012 (n = 437, 302) 40% 59% 1% 41% 56% 3% 37% 60% 3% 43% 54% 3% Increased Remained the same Decreased Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Wellness Initiatives Offered and Change in Investment
    9. 9. 9 Analysis to Determine Return on Investment and Cost-Savings from Wellness Initiatives 16% 7% 4% 72% Yes, my organization evaluated both the ROI and cost savings Yes, my organization evaluated the cost savings Yes, my organization evaluated the ROI No, my organiation did not evaluate the ROI nor the cost-savings 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Note: n = 201. Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. In 2014, did your organization conduct an analysis to determine the return on investment (ROI) and/or cost savings for its wellness initiatives?
    10. 10. 10 What do these findings mean for the HR profession? 52% 44% 4% 53% 42% 5% 56% 40% 4% 54% 40% 6% Increased Remained the same Decreased 2015 (n = 206) 2014 (n = 221) 2013 (n = 222) 2012 (n = 226) 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Change in Employee Participation in Wellness Initiatives Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. How did employee participation in your organization’s wellness initiatives change last year compared with the year before?
    11. 11. 11 What do these findings mean for the HR profession? Effectiveness of Wellness Initiatives in Reducing the Costs of Health Care and Improving the Overall Physical Health of Employees Improving the Overall Physical Health of Employees Reducing the Costs of Health Care 11% 71% 14% 4% 7% 71% 18% 4% 10% 66% 20% 3% 12% 74% 13% 2% Very effective Somewhat effective Not very effective Not at all effective 8% 69% 17% 7% 10% 62% 22% 6% 11% 60% 22% 7% 10% 58% 32% 1% Very effective Somewhat effective Not very effective Not at all effective 2015 (n = 198, 214) 2014 (n = 213, 214) 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 1 1 Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” or “not applicable” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. 1Statistically significant difference from 2012.
    12. 12. 59% 67% 56% 57% Yes 2015 (n = 243, 135) 2014 (n = 251, 154) 2013 (n = 268, 140) 2012 (n = 284, 140) 12 Wellness Incentives or Rewards and Effectiveness in Increasing Employee Participation 36% 56% 9% 0% 25% 60% 14% 1% 20% 62% 16% 2% 31% 55% 13% 1% Very effective Somewhat effective Not very effective Not at all effective 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 1 Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Response options provided were “yes/no/not sure.” Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Only “yes” responses are shown. Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place and wellness incentives or rewards were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. 1Statistically significant difference from 2013. How effective were these wellness incentives or rewards in increasing employee participation in your organization’s wellness initiatives? Did your organization offer some type of wellness incentive or reward last year?
    13. 13. 13 Types of Wellness Incentives or Rewards Offered What wellness incentives or rewards were offered to employees who participated in wellness initiatives last year? 45% 37% 25% 20% 7% 7% 3% 15% Reduction in health care premium Gift cards Company gift items, such as t-shirts, mugs and gym bags Recognition in a company newsletter, intranet, etc. Time off from work Bonus/cash* Contribution to HSA/HRA* Other 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Note: n = 143. Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. An asterisk (*) indicates that the response option was developed from open-ended responses.
    14. 14. 14 What do these findings mean for the HR profession?Wellness Initiatives Extended to Dependents Which employee dependent groups are your organization’s wellness initiatives extended to? Are any of your organization’s wellness initiatives extended to dependents? 99% 66% 58% 98% 57% 41% 98% 61% 58% 99% 58% 48% Spouses Same-sex domestic partners Opposite-sex domestic partners 46% 50% 45% 45% Yes 2015 (n = 242, 89-110) 2014 (n = 247, 108-123) 2013 (n = 261, 101-115) 2012 (n = 186, 117-129) 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 62%Dependent children* Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Response options provided were “yes/no/not sure.” Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Only “yes” responses are shown. Note: Respondents whose organizations extended wellness initiatives to employee dependents were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. *Includes foster children and dependent grandchildren; groups collapsed into one item on 2015 survey.
    15. 15. 16% 15% 17% 16% 22% 20% 23% 59% 59% 50% 53% 50% 53% 60% 16% 24% 21% 22% 28% 21% 18% 8% 2% 12% 9% 0% 6% 0% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2014 2015 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 Very likely Somewhat likely Not very likely Not at all likely Spouses Opposite-sex domestic partners 15 What do these findings mean for the HR profession?Likelihood of Dependents Participating in Organization’s Wellness Initiatives 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Dependent children* Same-sex domestic partners Note: 2015 n = 32-84; 2014 n = 32-105. Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place that were extended to each respective employee dependent group were asked this question. Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. *Includes foster children and dependent grandchildren; groups collapsed into one item on2015 survey. How likely are dependents to participate in your organization’s employee wellness initiatives?
    16. 16. 16 What do these findings mean for the HR profession?Alignment of Wellness and Financial Education Initiatives 32% 29% 19% 17% Yes 2015 (n = 217) 2014 (n = 223) 2013 (n = 340) 2012 (n = 402) 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 1,2 Note: Respondents whose organizations had wellness initiatives in place were asked this question. Response options provided were “yes/no/not sure.” Respondents who indicated they were “not sure” were excluded from this analysis. Only “yes” responses are shown. 1Statistically significant difference from 2013. 2Statistically significant difference from 2012. Are your employee wellness initiatives aligned with any financial education initiatives?
    17. 17. Click on "Insert/Header&Footer" and Type Survey Title Here ©SHRM 2013 17 Key Findings Demographics
    18. 18. 18 Note: n = 361. Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Percentage Manufacturing 23% Health care and social assistance 16% Professional, scientific and technical services 12% Finance and insurance 10% Government agencies 8% Educational services 7% Transportation and warehousing 6% Retail trade 6% Construction 5% Utilities 4% Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 4% Demographics: Organization Industry 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    19. 19. 19 Key FinDemographics: Organization Industry (continued) Note: n = 361. Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Percentage Wholesale trade 4% Administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services 4% Real estate and rental and leasing 3% Accommodation and food services 3% Religious, grant-making, civic, professional and similar organizations 3% Arts, entertainment and recreation 2% Repair and maintenance 2% Information 2% Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 1% Personal and laundry services 0% Other industry 11% 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    20. 20. 20 Key FinDemographics: Organization Sector 57% 18% 13% 9% 3% Privately owned for-profit Nonprofit Publicly owned for-profit Government Other n = 355 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015
    21. 21. 21 Key FinDemographics: Organization Staff Size n = 343 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 30% 35% 21% 10% 4% 1 to 99 employees 100 to 499 employees 500 to 2,499 employees 2,500 to 24,999 employees 25,000 or more employees
    22. 22. 22 Key FinDemographics: Other 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 n = 359 U.S.-based operations only 77% Multinational operations 23% Does your organization have U.S.-based operations (business units) only, or does it operate multinationally? n = 360 n = 226 n = 226 Single-unit organization: An organization in which the location and the organization are one and the same. 38% Multi-unit organization: An organization that has more than one location. 62% Is your organization a single-unit organization or a multi-unit organization? For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies and practices determined by the multi-unit headquarters, by each work location or by both? Multi-unit headquarters determines HR policies and practices. 56% Each work location determines HR policies and practices. 3% A combination of both the work location and the multi-unit headquarters determines HR policies and practices. 41% Corporate (companywide) 75% Business unit/division 11% Facility/location 14% What is the HR department/function for which you responded throughout this survey?
    23. 23. 23 SHRM Survey Findings: Survey Methodology SHRM Survey Findings: Strategic Benefits—Wellness Initiatives 2015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Survey Methodology: • Response rate = 12% • 461 HR professionals from a randomly selected sample of SHRM’s membership participated in this survey • Margin of error +/- 5% • Survey fielded May-June 2015 Project Lead: Karen Wessels, researcher, workforce planning, SHRM Research Project Contributors: Evren Esen, director, SHRM-SCP, Survey Programs, SHRM Research Bruce Elliott, manager, SHRM-SCP, Compensation and Benefits Joseph Coombs, senior analyst, workforce trends, SHRM Research
    24. 24. 242015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 Additional SHRM Resources Health Care Reform Resource Page: shrm.org/healthcare For more survey/poll findings, visit shrm.org/surveys For more information about SHRM’s Research Services: » Customized Research Service, visit shrm.org/customizedresearch » Engagement Survey Service, visit shrm.org/peopleinsight » Customized Benchmarking Service, visit shrm.org/benchmarks Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_Research
    25. 25. 252015 Strategic Benefits Survey—Wellness Initiatives ©SHRM 2015 About SHRM Founded in 1948, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world’s largest HR membership organization devoted to human resource management. Representing more than 275,000 members in over 160 countries, the Society is the leading provider of resources to serve the needs of HR professionals and advance the professional practice of human resource management. SHRM has more than 575 affiliated chapters within the United States and subsidiary offices in China, India and United Arab Emirates. Visit us at shrm.org.

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