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Supporting Student Success

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  • Transcript

    • 1. David Johnston, Connecticut Postsecondary Education Committee Chris Klefeker, Academic Adviser and Retention Specialist, Foster Care Liaison; Miami University Hamilton Alisha Hawkins , Coordinator Guardian Scholars Program; Ball State University Eileen McCaffrey , Executive Director; Orphan Foundation of America Columbus State Community College, May 12, 2009 How We Can Help Students Succeed
    • 2. Higher Ed and Child Welfare as Partners
      • Identify potential and current students
      • Raise awareness of community resources for ALL students (i.e. housing, medical, food, transportation, child care, etc.)
      • Forge relationships with people who have a history with your student and are familiar with his or her situation
    • 3. First Steps
      • Planning committee, representing relevant campus functions, creates a pilot.
      • Designate a “champion” on campus; a "single point of contact for foster youth,”
      • Create a “peer support group”, voluntarily attended, of foster youth on-campus – identified via ODJFS, foster parents, and quiet outreach on campus.
      • Train campus staff about issues challenging foster youth on campus and over school breaks and vacations.
    • 4. Open the Door to Their Future
      • College visits
      • FAFSA
      • ETV funds
      • GEAR UP: Gaining early awareness for undergraduate programs
      • TRIO: First-generation college students
      • AVID : Advancement via individual determination
    • 5. College Recruitment
      • Hold ILP classes on a college campus
      • Send your foster care liaison to high school visits, or to group homes or transition housing
      • Create posters and signs with Ohio Reach logo
      • Hold advising appointments with the emancipation coordinator and the prospective or new student
    • 6. College Retention
      • Better preparation
      • Connections on campus
      • Choosing a college closer to home
      • OCOG and Pell Grant
      • Peer Support Networks
      • College Liaison
      • Paired with a mentor in the community
      • Connections amongst schools for smooth transfers or relocations
    • 7. Keys to Campus Survival
      • Housing during breaks
      • Transportation
      • Support systems
    • 8. What About Evaluation?
      • Grades and GPA
      • Courses taken
      • On-Campus activities
      • Transfers and reasons for doing so
      • If dropped out, reasons for doing so
      • Graduation
      • Current status, whereabouts, activities – ideally at certain time intervals (e.g., 1,3, & 5 years)
    • 9. Six Elements for Program Development:
      • Designated leadership
      • Internal and external champions
      • Collaborations with community agencies
      • Data-driven decision making
      • Staff/peer support and professional development
      • Sustainability planning
    • 10. Identifying College Students from Foster Care
      • FAFSA data base queries (question #53)
      • Work w/ your area independent living, child welfare/social workers, and agencies
      • Brochures, posters, media spots
      • Websites – both college, social services, and youth
      • Foster care status question on applications & “sign in” forms
      • Outreach to area high school counselors
      • Use of Ohio Reach Symbol in your office and your Foster Care Liaison title on your business cards
      • Word of mouth – student/youth networks
    • 11. Collaborative Student Support: ETV Colleges Emancipation/ ILP
    • 12. Existing Models: Funded and Zero Budget
    • 13. Funded Models
      • Guardian Scholars - BSU
      • Seita Scholars - WMU
      • Dr. John Seita = foster care alum
      • 2007 statewide conference initiated
      • Scholarship covers tuition and FA covers most other expenses (*51 students)
      • Campus Coaches
      • Career plans; life skills
      • Students on Planning Committee
      • Initiated by Lumina Foundation approaching BSU
      • Four campuses; three community colleges and one residential campus (*25-30 students)
      • Life skills, tutoring, care packages, social programming
      • Student Board
    • 14. Zero Budget Models
      • Miami University
      • All three regional campuses along with the new VOA site have named liaisons.
      • The state does not provide additional assistance.
      • Each liaison is linked with a different student support office: advising, learning assistance, transition/retention
      • CA FYSI Schools
      • 110 CA community colleges participating
      • The state does not provide additional financial assistance
      • Each campus has an appointed liaison, whom is typically associated with the Financial Aid Office or EOP
    • 15. Zero Budget Models Continued
      • Miami University
      • On the MU campuses the liaisons will work with an average of 1-4 FCA per year, in addition to recruitment and advocacy efforts
      • Comprehensive Financial Aid package (based on a “O” EFC)
      • Advising point of contact (*on three campuses) with their liaison
      • CA FYSI Schools
      • During 2007-2008 the smallest number of FCA seen by a campus was 1 student. The largest number seen was 495 students
      • Comprehensive Financial Aid package and assistance with filling out forms
      • Varying student supports i.e. counseling & advising
    • 16. Open Discussion