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Who is Not Studying Abroad? 
An examination of three institutional perspectives on expanding study abroad opportunities 
?
Your Presenters: 
Wagaye Johannes, Chair, Institute of International Education 
Scott Manning, Dean of Global Programs and...
What Do We Know?
4 
U.S. Study Abroad Trends 
• More students than ever – nearly 300,000 
• More non-credit opportunities 
• More short ter...
Diversity & U.S. Study Abroad 
Targeted outreach, recruitment and funding can substantially increase minority participatio...
Three “GameChangers” 
Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities
Institute For Study Abroad, Butler University’s 
First Generation College Student Program
•What is our responsibility as a non-profit study abroad organization? Who are we trying to educate? 
•Often have research...
Curriculum Challenges 
Critical FGCS Characteristics: 
•More practical, focused on vocation; more likely to be non-humanit...
Cost 
Critical FGCS Characteristics: 
Less likely to take out loans, are financially and academically risk averse 
More li...
Changing Institutional Culture 
Deficits vs Assets 
–Cultural deficit model: stems from (often negative) assumptions about...
Lessons Learned 
•Money isn’t the only barrier, or even the primary barrier. 
•Be prepared to provide additional mentoring...
Susquehanna University: 
The SU Global Opportunities (GO) Program
What did it take to double (triple) study abroad at Susquehanna University?
Identified the Obstacles 
•70% of incoming students said they planned to study abroad 
•30% actually studied abroad 
•What...
Curriculum Challenges 
•Students: Perceived difficulty of semester away (despite generous financial aid and course transfe...
Students 
–Large first-generation population 
–Lack of travel experience 
–Close-knit campus community 
–Large percentage ...
Cost Challenges 
•Students: Between high-need and no-need 
•Institution: Budget for significant need-based grant aid commi...
Clemson University: 
The Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries Haiti
Clemson University: 
The Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries Haiti
7 Civil Engineering students in 2009 
90 across 30 majors in 2014 
Overview 
Creative Inquiry
Curriculum
Cost
Culture
Lessons Learned
u 
What actions/ideas will you pursue to break barriers?
Who is Not Studying Abroad? An Examination of Three Institutional Perspectives on Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities
Who is Not Studying Abroad? An Examination of Three Institutional Perspectives on Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities
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Who is Not Studying Abroad? An Examination of Three Institutional Perspectives on Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities

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To understand how to expand education abroad opportunities, we need to understand who is not going abroad. Presenters will share what they've done (or are doing) to expand participation with respect to the barriers of cost, curriculum, and culture. Participants will be invited to share best practices on how to change perception and make study abroad – academic study, work, or internships – more accessible. Case studies will include the Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries (CEDC) Haiti Initiative, an innovative student-directed program; Susquehanna University, which made study away a curricular requirement; and Medgar Evers College, the only Predominantly Black College (PBI) in the City University of New York, will explain how a one-person office has increased the numbers of underrepresented students going abroad.

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Who is Not Studying Abroad? An Examination of Three Institutional Perspectives on Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities

  1. 1. Who is Not Studying Abroad? An examination of three institutional perspectives on expanding study abroad opportunities ?
  2. 2. Your Presenters: Wagaye Johannes, Chair, Institute of International Education Scott Manning, Dean of Global Programs and Associate Professor of French at Susquehanna University. Uttiyo Raychaudhuri, Director for Study Abroad at Clemson University Michelle Tolan, Field Director for Diversity Access and Research Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
  3. 3. What Do We Know?
  4. 4. 4 U.S. Study Abroad Trends • More students than ever – nearly 300,000 • More non-credit opportunities • More short term programs
  5. 5. Diversity & U.S. Study Abroad Targeted outreach, recruitment and funding can substantially increase minority participation in study abroad. U.S. Study Abroad 2012/13 Total Minorities: 24% African American Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic Other White *U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics, 2013 Gilman Program 2012/13 Total Minorities 59% U.S. Higher Education* Total Minorities: 39%
  6. 6. Three “GameChangers” Expanding Study Abroad Opportunities
  7. 7. Institute For Study Abroad, Butler University’s First Generation College Student Program
  8. 8. •What is our responsibility as a non-profit study abroad organization? Who are we trying to educate? •Often have research and internship opportunities not available at the undergraduate level in the U.S. •Global citizenry
  9. 9. Curriculum Challenges Critical FGCS Characteristics: •More practical, focused on vocation; more likely to be non-humanities majors •Less likely to achieve high scores on college entrance examinations and enter college without AP credits •Academic (not financial) restrictions cited as largest contributor to attrition for study abroad (University of Texas)
  10. 10. Cost Critical FGCS Characteristics: Less likely to take out loans, are financially and academically risk averse More likely to come from a low socioeconomic background Less likely to participate in “optional” activities: perception of investment IFSA-Butler First Generation College Student Scholarship –Where/when do they need funds? –For what programs and student status is it eligible? –How do we decide? Results: Fall 2012 participants: 2% first gen; Spring 2014 participants: 17% first gen
  11. 11. Changing Institutional Culture Deficits vs Assets –Cultural deficit model: stems from (often negative) assumptions about students’ “cultural deprivation.” •Absolves us from the responsibility to educate all students appropriately? –Rethinking forms of capital •Aspirational, social, and navigational (Yosso, 2005) Results: WORK IN PROGRESS.
  12. 12. Lessons Learned •Money isn’t the only barrier, or even the primary barrier. •Be prepared to provide additional mentoring and support through the entire process. •Where a critical-mass of students exists, identify allies serving them. They are the trusted advisors who will advocate for study abroad if they believe in it, and you. •Try to meet them halfway (e.g. summer programs, center-based programs). They might not all be ready for an immersive, semester long experience. •Career Focus messaging •Avoid further marginalizing students in an attempt to support them.
  13. 13. Susquehanna University: The SU Global Opportunities (GO) Program
  14. 14. What did it take to double (triple) study abroad at Susquehanna University?
  15. 15. Identified the Obstacles •70% of incoming students said they planned to study abroad •30% actually studied abroad •What were the challenges?
  16. 16. Curriculum Challenges •Students: Perceived difficulty of semester away (despite generous financial aid and course transfer policies) •Institution: Creating pathways for shorter but equally substantive experiences
  17. 17. Students –Large first-generation population –Lack of travel experience –Close-knit campus community –Large percentage of student athletes Institution –Shift emphasis from academic study abroad to experiential learning –Broaden study abroad to study away –Increased co- curricular support before & after study away
  18. 18. Cost Challenges •Students: Between high-need and no-need •Institution: Budget for significant need-based grant aid commitment
  19. 19. Clemson University: The Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries Haiti
  20. 20. Clemson University: The Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries Haiti
  21. 21. 7 Civil Engineering students in 2009 90 across 30 majors in 2014 Overview Creative Inquiry
  22. 22. Curriculum
  23. 23. Cost
  24. 24. Culture
  25. 25. Lessons Learned
  26. 26. u What actions/ideas will you pursue to break barriers?

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