Study Of Psychographic Profile Of Patronage Preference Group

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1. To study the impact of psychographic profile on the various aspects of shopping and patronage.

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Study Of Psychographic Profile Of Patronage Preference Group

  1. 1. PROJECT ON STUDY OF PSYCHOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF PATRONAGE PREFERENCE GROUP (MEMBERSHIP CARD HOLDERS) 1
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS SERIAL NO. TOPIC PAGE NO. 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 2. INTRODUCTION 5 3. LITERATURE REVIEW 6 4. OBJECTIVES 8 5. RESEARCH DESIGN 9 6. DATA ANALYSIS 10 7. CONCLUSION AND 33 RECOMMENDATIONS 8. LIMITATIONS 36 9. APPENDIX AND ANNEXURES 37 10. REFERENCES 41 2
  3. 3. CHAPTER 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY There has been an increase in the membership card distribution by the retailers to attract more customers and to make the present customers feel more attached to the shops or retail outlets. Psychographic factors include attitudes, opinion, interest, lifestyle, value system. All these factors play a vital role in the use of membership card by the consumers. There are certain other demographic factors which also influences the use of card by the consumers or. In our study we have concentrated on how both the psychographic and demographic factors influence the customer orientation towards membership card holding. In our exploratory study we have concentrated on the elite class, working class, students. A conclusive research has been carried out for the purpose. The data has been collected from Atta market (sector-18), Great India Place, Centre Stage Mall (Noida). A random sample of 120 odd people was chosen for the study. 3
  4. 4. CHAPTER 2: INTRODUCTION The present study is aimed at knowing the perception regarding the psychographic profile of patronage preference group (membership owner cards). In marketing research, ‘Psychographic profile’ means the study and classification of people according to their attitudes, aspirations, and other psychological criteria. It addresses the way in which consumers express themselves in a social and cultural environment. Psychographic variables may include any attributes that may be related to personality values, attitudes, interest, and lifestyle. These factors may also be called as IOA variables that are Interest, Opinion, and Attitudes. When an assessment of persons psychographic variables is formed that is termed as psychographic profile. These kind of psychographic profiles are very important for marketing as well as in promotion of the products. With response to the increasing services provided by the different firms, most of the firms are now focusing on providing better services to the consumers, these services also include the distribution of membership cards which provides special discounts and services to the special consumers of the stores. It is very important in the present scenario to understand and pay attention on the psychographic make up of the potential consumers, their values and perception about the various factors like quality of the product, brand name, image, variety and also the price. This can be done using survey, talking to the people or just by observation. 4
  5. 5. 2A. LITERATURE REVIEW 1. Du Preez Ronel: visser M. Elizabeth: Zietsman Lucille, Lifestyle, shopping orientation, patronage behavior and shopping mall behavior- A Study of South African Male Apparel Consumer, European Advance in Consumer Research, Vol-8, p.279 Consumers’ expressions in social and cultural environment are influenced by lifestyle and psychographics. Consumers lifestyle and value systems are not only shaped by their family, peer, community but also by the events which takes place during the life. Various aspects like, personal characteristics, information sources, store attributes, visual merchandise affects the store patronage of consumers and thus in order to comprehend the patronage behavior the retailers must understand the determinants of consumers shopping orientation. Source: http://www.eacrwebsite.org/vol-8 2. Shekhar M. Raj(2005) conducted a Study on the Changing Retail Scenario in India Glitzy malls are coming up in a huge number all over the country. Delhi has already Ansal Plaza and many more like this expected to come in the near future. The retailers are already threatened from these malls. Today the consumers are much more comfortable with the quality, the brands provide. More families now prefer to shop on weekends preferring those shops, which are situated near to their homes. So it is showing that, now Indian consumers are ready for organized retail. The consumers’ present scenario has very less time for shopping and entertainment. They feel no regret, paying higher price to get premium quality products from a place that can offer products and services to fulfill their diverse needs. 3. Lifestyle analysis- a tool for understanding buyer behavior 5
  6. 6. Its very important to understand consumers behavior as it helps marketer to understand how a consumer thinks feels and selects from the various alternatives like products, brands and also how the factors like environment, reference group and family influences the consumer. In this study, the researcher has emphasized on the importance of lifestyle and its impact on the buyer behavior. Source: http// www.aima-ind.org/ejournal/articlepdf/jayasrepaper.pdf 4. International Journal Of Retail & distribution management, Volume 25, November 11, 1997 Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited This study shows the importance of lifestyle factors. In this study the consumers were divided into three different groups based on their level of shopping activity: low, medium, high. The result showed that each of the group had different store patronage practices, psychographic profiles and income levels. This showed that retailers should work to enhance and grow in the direction of the organized retail to attract consumers. 6
  7. 7. 2B. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY 1. To study the impact of psychographic profile on the various aspects of shopping and patronage. 7
  8. 8. CHAPTER 3: RESEARCH DESIGN Type of Research: Descriptive research 1) Scope of Research: Research is done at CENTER STAGE MALL, GREAT INDIA PLACE, SECTOR 18 NOIDA 2) Sampling: sampling plan for the study is simple random sampling. A) Sampling element: people coming in Center Stage Mall, Great India Place and Atta market. B) Sampling Approach: Judgmental sampling under non probabilistic sampling approach. C) Sampling size: 120 customers. 3) Questionnaire design: for research purpose questionnaire is designed under Cross sectional design approach with both closed and open ended questions keeping in mind objectives of the research. Questions are formed using various scales like likert( 5 point scale) , nominal and ordinal to collect data. 4) Data collection: A) Primary Data Collection: primary data was collected through (i) Mall intercept interview of customers coming in above places Data collection instrument is Questionnaire. 5) Data analysis and Hypothesis Testing: After collecting data through survey various tools were used to analysis data. These include frequency distribution, bar chart-pie chart representation, cross tab, Annova test,T- test and Factor analysis. Hypotheses were also tested. 8
  9. 9. 6) Conclusion: All hypotheses have been consolidated. CHAPTER 4: DATA ANLYSIS AND FINDINGS RESEARCH ANALYSIS The analysis has been done using factor analysis, ANNOVA and Crosstabs chi square tests. Factor analysis will help to decide the factors influencing the membership of various cards. The Crosstabs and chi square tests will help to find the relationships between different factors. ANNOVA will help us to define relationship between income groups and various factors. 4.1 CROSS TABS Case Processing Summary Cases Valid Missing Total N Percent N Percent N Percent OCCUPATION * TYPE OF CREDIT 120 100.0% 0 .0% 120 100.0% CARD OWNED Table 4.1.1 9
  10. 10. 1. Null Hypothesis (H0)- There is no significant relation between occupation and type of credit card owned. 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1)- There is significant relation between occupation and type of credit card owned. Table 4.1.2 OCCUPATION * TYPE OF CREDIT CARD OWNED Cross tabulation Count TYPE OF CREDIT CARD OWNED American Departmental express Master card Visa card store card Others Total OCCUPATI C.A 3 0 0 1 1 5 ON Doctor 2 6 5 0 1 14 Teacher 0 1 4 3 1 9 Lawyer 4 4 0 0 0 8 Engineer 2 5 6 2 1 16 Student 1 6 2 6 25 40 Business 1 6 6 1 1 15 men/women Others 0 0 0 7 6 13 Total 13 28 23 20 36 120 10
  11. 11. Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. Value df (2-sided) Pearson Chi-Square 1.053E2a 28 .000 Likelihood Ratio 107.486 28 .000 Linear-by-Linear 18.240 1 .000 Association N of Valid Cases 120 a. 36 cells (90.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is .54. Table 4.1.3 The value of Pearson Chi- Square is 0.000. Hence the null hypothesis is rejected. We can conclude that kind of occupation affect the type of credit card being owned by different professionals. From the above table we get that C.A prefer to use American Express card as compared to all other cards. Hence it can be said that they earn most as compare to all other professionals. From the above table we get that Doctors prefer to use Master card as compared to all other cards. From the above table we get that teacher and Engineer prefer to use Visa card as compared to all other cards. From the above table we get that lawyer prefer to use American Express and master 11
  12. 12. card as compared to all other cards. From the above table we get that Students prefer to use any kind of card which is available to them, as they earn less or sometimes nothing. From the above table we get that Business men/women prefer to use Visa and master card as compared to all other cards. Hence the null hypothesis is rejected and it can be concluded that there is significant relation between occupation and type of credit card owned. Symmetric Measures Asymp. Std. Approx. Value Errora Approx. Tb Sig. Interval by Pearson's R .392 .076 4.622 .000c Interval Ordinal by Spearman .387 .077 4.553 .000c Ordinal Correlation N of Valid Cases 120 a. Not assuming the null hypothesis. b. Using the asymptotic standard error assuming the null hypothesis. c. Based on normal approximation. Table 4.1.4 12
  13. 13. 4.2 : One Way ANNOVA 4.2.1: Income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. 1. Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. Independent Variable: Income Group Dependent Variable: Frequency of purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. ANOVA INCOME GROUP Sum of Squares Df Mean Square F Sig. Between 21.163 4 5.291 4.056 .004 Groups Within Groups 150.004 115 1.304 Total 171.167 119 Table 4.2.1 f-cal > f-tab 4.056 > 2.45 13
  14. 14. As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. 4.2.2: Income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 1. Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. Independent Variable: Income Group Dependent Variable: Frequency of holidays as a mark of status. ANOVA INCOME GROUP Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between 14.099 4 3.525 2.581 .041 Groups Within Groups 157.067 115 1.366 Total 171.167 119 Table 4.2.2 f-cal > f-tab 4.056 > 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null 14
  15. 15. hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 4.2.3: Age and satisfaction by the services provided by membership card 1. Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between age and satisfaction by the services provided by membership card 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between age and satisfaction by the services provided by membership card Independent Variable: Age Dependent Variable: Satisfaction by the services provided by membership card ANOVA AGE Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between 5.436 4 1.359 2.823 .028 Groups Within Groups 55.364 115 .481 Total 60.800 119 Table 4.2.3 f-cal > f-tab 2.823> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null 15
  16. 16. hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 4.2.4: Age and importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price 1. Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between age and importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between age and importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price Independent Variable: Age Dependent Variable: importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price ANOVA AGE Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between 6.720 4 1.680 3.573 .009 Groups Within Groups 54.080 115 .470 Total 60.800 119 Table 4.2.4 f-cal > f-tab 3.573> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 16
  17. 17. 4.2.5: Occupation and Satisfaction by the services of membership cards 1.Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between Occupation and satisfaction by the services of membership cards 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between Occupation and satisfaction by the services of membership cards Independent Variable: Occupation Dependent Variable: satisfied by the services of membership cards ANOVA OCCUPATION Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between 44.714 4 11.179 3.071 .019 Groups Within Groups 418.611 115 3.640 Total 463.325 119 Table 4.2.5 f-cal > f-tab 3.071> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 17
  18. 18. 4.2.6: Occupation and influence by lifestyle of celebrities 1. Null Hypothesis (H0) - There is no significant difference between Occupation and influence by lifestyle of celebrities 2. Alternative Hypothesis (H1) - There is significant difference between Occupation and influence by lifestyle of celebrities Independent Variable: occupation Dependent Variable: Influence by lifestyle of celebrities ANOVA INCOME GROUP Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between 14.099 4 3.525 2.581 .041 Groups Within Groups 157.067 115 1.366 Total 171.167 119 Table 4.2.6 f-cal > f-tab 2.281> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 4.3: Factor Analysis 18
  19. 19. 4.3.1: KMO and Bartlett's Test KMO and Bartlett's Test Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling .759 Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Approx. Chi-Square 447.938 Sphericity Df 78 Sig. .000 Table 4.3.1 KMO and Bartlett's Test is the strength of the relationship among variables large enough. Large values for the KMO measure indicate that a factor analysis of the variables is a good idea. For the example, notice that the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy is greater than .50 4.3.2: Communalities: Initial vs. Extraction  Communalities - This is the proportion of each variable's variance that can be explained by the principal components (e.g., the underlying latent continua). It is also noted as h2 and can be defined as the sum of squared factor loadings. 19
  20. 20. Communalities Initial Extraction I LIKE TO GET THE MEMBERSHIP 1.000 .679 CARDS OF DIFFERENT STORES PREFER USING MEMBERSHIP 1.000 .731 CARDS MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING INFLUENCES 1.000 .745 SHOPPING BEHAVIOR INFLENCED BY LIFESTYLE OF 1.000 .619 CELEBRITIES PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN 1.000 .571 STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS LIKETO SPEND ON LUXURIOUS 1.000 .615 CLOTHES QUALITY OF MERCHANDISE OIS IMPORTANT 1.000 .469 REGARDLESS OF PRICE STISIED BY .814 SERVICES OF 1.000 MEMBERSHIP CARDS 20
  21. 21. Table 4.3.2 Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Squared Rotation Sums of Squared Initial Eigenvalues Loadings Loadings Compone % of Cumulativ % of Cumulative % of Cumulativ nt Total Variance e% Total Variance % Total Variance e% 1 4.076 31.354 31.354 4.076 31.354 31.354 3.169 24.378 24.378 2 1.554 11.950 43.304 1.554 11.950 43.304 2.118 16.289 40.667 3 1.236 9.505 52.809 1.236 9.505 52.809 1.459 11.222 51.889 4 1.115 8.578 61.387 1.115 8.578 61.387 1.235 9.498 61.387 5 .948 7.294 68.681 6 .786 6.043 74.723 7 .707 5.441 80.165 8 .638 4.908 85.073 9 .569 4.380 89.453 10 .454 3.492 92.945 11 .413 3.178 96.122 12 .286 2.197 98.319 13 .218 1.681 100.000 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Table 4.3.3 About 61.387 % of the total variance in the 13 variables is attributable to the first four components. Also we can judge how well the four-component model describes the original variables, by examine the above table and concluded that Component 1 explains a variance of 3.169, which is 24.378% of total variance of 13, Component 2 explains a variance of 2.118, which is 40.667% of total variance. Similarly, same kind of conclusion can be drawn for other components. The amount of variance accounted for by the four components is 7.98031, which about 61.387% of the total variance in 21
  22. 22. the 13 variables is attributable to the first six components (7.98031 / 13 = .6138), and remaining 9 components together accounts for 38.613 of the total variance. 4.3.4: Component Matrix before Rotation 22
  23. 23. Component Matrixa Component 1 2 3 4 PREFER USING MEMBERSHIP .794 CARDS PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN .728 STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING .697 INFLUENCES SHOPPING BEHAVIOR I LIKE TO GET THE MEMBERSHIP .690 -.436 CARDS OF DIFFERENT STORES LIKETO SPEND ON LUXURIOUS .690 CLOTHES QUALITY OF MERCHANDISE OIS IMPORTANT .573 REGARDLESS OF PRICE LIKE TO SPEND A LOT ON CLOTHES .448 .570 AND ACCESSORIES LIKE TO BUY .547 23
  24. 24. Component Matrixa Component 1 2 3 4 PREFER USING MEMBERSHIP .794 CARDS PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN .728 STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING .697 INFLUENCES SHOPPING BEHAVIOR I LIKE TO GET THE MEMBERSHIP .690 -.436 CARDS OF DIFFERENT STORES LIKETO SPEND ON LUXURIOUS .690 CLOTHES QUALITY OF MERCHANDISE OIS IMPORTANT .573 REGARDLESS OF PRICE LIKE TO SPEND A LOT ON CLOTHES .448 .570 AND ACCESSORIES LIKE TO BUY .547 24
  25. 25. Table 4.3.4 This matrix contains the loadings of each variable onto each factor. By default SPSS displays all loadings; however, we requested that all loadings less than .4 be suppressed in the output and so there are blank spaces for many of the loadings. This matrix is not particularly important for interpretation. 4.3.5: Rotated Component Matrix 25
  26. 26. Rotated Component Matrixa Component 1 2 3 4 Table 4.3.5 MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING The rotated INFLUENCES .849 component SHOPPING matrix is a BEHAVIOR matrix of the PREFER USING factor loadings MEMBERSHIP .764 for each variable CARDS onto factors. This matrix LIKETO SPEND ON contains the LUXURIOUS .730 same CLOTHES information as I LIKE TO GET THE the component MEMBERSHIP matrix in given .708 CARDS OF above except that DIFFERENT STORES it is calculated PREFER TO BUY after rotation. To DESIGNER LABEL comparing this RATHER THAN .647 matrix with the STORE BRANDED un rotated PRODUCTS solution, before rotation, most QUALITY OF variables are MERCHANDISE OIS highly loaded IMPORTANT .517 onto the first REGARDLESS OF factor and the PRICE remaining LIKE TO BUY factors didn’t OUTFIT OF LATEST .743 really get a look FASHION in. From this LIKE TO SPEND A table we can LOT ON CLOTHES .730 draw following AND ACCESSORIES loading of the variable onto AWARE OF .690 FASHION TREND 26 AND LIKE TO BE
  27. 27. factor. Component Transformation Matrix Comp onent 1 2 3 4 1 .817 .474 .283 .170 2 -.412 .878 -.196 -.143 3 -.216 .019 .865 -.452 4 -.342 .061 .364 .864 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization. Table 4.3.6 4.3.7 : Factor Analysis:- Factors* Variables Factor Variance % (Cumulative) Loadings 27
  28. 28. Factor 1 MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING INFLUENCES .849 24.378 SHOPPING BEHAVIOR, (4.076) (24.378) .764 PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS .730 LIKETO SPEND ON LUXURIOUS CLOTHES, .708 I LIKE TO GET THE MEMBERSHIP CARDS OF DIFFERENT STORES, .647 PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS, QUALITY OF MERCHANDISE OIS IMPORTANT .517 REGARDLESS OF PRICE Factor 2 LIKE TO BUY OUTFIT OF LATEST FASHION, .743 16.289 (1.554) (40.667) LIKE TO SPEND A LOT ON CLOTHES AND .730 ACCESSORIES, .690 AWARE OF FASHION TREND AND LIKE TO BE FIRST TO TRY THEM, 28
  29. 29. CONFIDENT OF MY ABILITY TO RECOGNIZE .444 FASHION TRENDS Factor 3 INFLENCED BY LIFESTYLE OF CELEBRITIES .707 11.222 (1.236) (51.889) FREQUENT HOLIDAYS IS MARK OF STATUS .686 Factor 4 STISIED BY SERVICES OF MEMBERSHIP .888 9.498 (1.115) CARDS (61.387) *Numbers in the parentheses in the first column represent eigenvalues of the corresponding Table 4.3.7 Factor Discussion: Factor 1-: This factor has emerged as a most important determinant of research with a total variance of 24.378. Major element of this factor include user present MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING INFLUENCES SHOPPING BEHAVIOR, (.849), PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS (.764) etc. Factor 2: This factor has emerged as the second most important determinant of research with a total variance of 16.289. Major element of this factor include 29
  30. 30. Immediate supervisor is reasonable (.743), AWARE OF FASHION TREND AND LIKE TO BE FIRST TO TRY THEM,(.690) etc. Factor 3: This factor emerged as the important determinants of research with a variance of 11.222. Major elements consisting this factor INFLENCED BY LIFESTYLE OF CELEBRITIES (.707), FREQUENT HOLIDAYS IS MARK OF STATUS (.686). This study shows that suggestion and development program affects the satisfaction level. Factor 4: This factor has emerged as the effective determinants of research with a variance of 9.498. The major elements consisting this factor STISIED BY SERVICES OF MEMBERSHIP CARDS and general supervision(.888). This study reveals that because of supervision satisfaction may increase or decrease. Chapter 5: CONCLUSION & RECOMMENDATIONS 1: CROSS TABS The value of Pearson Chi- Square is 0.000. Hence the null hypothesis is rejected. We can conclude that kind of occupation affect the type of credit card being owned by different professionals. 2: ONE WAY ANNOVA 2.1: Income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. f-cal > f-tab 4.056 > 2.45 30
  31. 31. As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and purchasing of outfit of latest fashion. 2.2 : Income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. f-cal > f-tab 4.056 > 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 2.3: Income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. f-cal > f-tab 2.581 > 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the income group and frequency of holidays as a mark of status. 2.4: Age and satisfaction by the services provided by membership card f-cal > f-tab 2.823> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the age and satisfaction by the services provided by membership card 31
  32. 32. 2.5 : Age and importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price f-cal > f-tab 3.573> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the age and importance of quality of merchandise regardless of price 2.6: Occupation and satisfaction by the services of membership cards f-cal > f-tab 3.071> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the occupation and satisfaction by the services of membership cards 2.7 : occupation and influence by lifestyle of celebrities f-cal > f-tab 2.281> 2.45 As significance value is less than 0.05, and f-cal is greater than f-tab so null hypothesis is rejected and we will accept the alternate hypothesis. Hence there is a significant difference between the occupation and influence by lifestyle of celebrities 3: FACTOR ANALYSIS Factor 1-: This factor has emerged as a most important determinant of research with 32
  33. 33. a total variance of 24.378. Major element of this factor include user present MEMBERSHIP CARDS HOLDING INFLUENCES SHOPPING BEHAVIOR, (.849), PREFER TO BUY DESIGNER LABEL RATHER THAN STORE BRANDED PRODUCTS (.764) etc. Factor 2: This factor has emerged as the second most important determinant of research with a total variance of 16.289. Major element of this factor include Immediate supervisor is reasonable (.743), AWARE OF FASHION TREND AND LIKE TO BE FIRST TO TRY THEM,(.690) etc. Factor 3: This factor emerged as the important determinants of research with a variance of 11.222. Major elements consisting this factor INFLENCED BY LIFESTYLE OF CELEBRITIES (.707), FREQUENT HOLIDAYS IS MARK OF STATUS (.686). This study shows that suggestion and development program affects the satisfaction level. Factor 4: This factor has emerged as the effective determinants of research with a variance of 9.498. The major elements consisting this factor STISIED BY SERVICES OF MEMBERSHIP CARDS and general supervision(.888). This study reveals that because of supervision satisfaction may increase or decrease. CHAPTER 6: LIMITATIONS The following were the limitations that came during the commencement of the project:  The data collection was through personal interview and therefore biasness is one of the limitations.  Due to the time constraints all the customers were not covered.  The sample was restricted to 120 customers, which may restrict the scope and completion of study. Due to small sample size results obtained from the study can’t be generalized.  Most of the students’ interviewed were working as a part timers hence the students statistics cannot be generalized.  The scope of study is restricted only to the Noida region. 33
  34. 34. STUDY OF PSYCHOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF PATRONAGE PREFRENCE GROUP (MEMBERSHIP CARD HOLDER) QUESTIONNAIRE Dear Respondents , You are requested to fill the provided questionnaire regarding the psychographic profile and lifestyle that affects your shopping behavior and your preference towards membership cards. 1. Gender <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect Male <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect Female 2. Age <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectLess Than 20 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect20-30 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect30-40 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectAbove 40 3. Occupation <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectC.A <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectDoctor <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectTeacher <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectLawyer <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectEngineer <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectStudent <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectBusiness man/woman <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectOthers 4. Income Group (per month) <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect30,000-50,000 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect 50,000-1,00,000 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectAbove 1,00,000 <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect Below 10,000 34
  35. 35. 5. How Often Do You Go For Shopping. <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectWeekly <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectMonthly <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectHalf Yearly <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectYearly 6. Do you own a membership card. <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectYes <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectNo 7. When shopping what do you look for. ____ Value for money ____ good quality ____ Customer services ____ product image_ 8. For your primary residence do you- <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect Own a house <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectRent a house or apartment <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectOwn a townhouse <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectOthers 9. Which type of credit card do you use regularly. <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectAmerican Express <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectMaster Card <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectVisa Card <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectDepartmental Store Card <INPUT TYPE= RADIO > MACROBUTTON HTMLDirectOthers 35
  36. 36. 1-STRONGLY AGREE , 2- AGREE , 3- NEUTRAL , 4- DISAGREE, 5- STRONGLY DISAGREE S STATEMENTS OPTIONS NO. 1 I like to get the membership cards of different stores. 1 2 3 4 5 2 I prefer using membership cards. 1 2 3 4 5 3 My membership card holding influences my shopping 1 2 3 4 5 behavior. 4 I am influenced by the lifestyle of the celebrities and like to 1 2 3 4 5 follow it 5 I prefer to buy designer labels rather than store branded 1 2 3 4 5 merchandise. 6 I like to spend on luxurious products. 1 2 3 4 5 7 Quality of merchandise is important for me regardless of 1 2 3 4 5 price. 8 I am satisfied by the services provided by membership card 1 2 3 4 5 9 I always buy at least one outfit of latest fashion. 1 2 3 4 5 10 I spend a lot of money on clothes and accessories. 1 2 3 4 5 11 I am aware of the fashion trend and want to be one of the 1 2 3 4 5 first to try them. 12 I am confident in my ability to recognize fashion trend 1 2 3 4 5 13 For me frequent holidays are a mark of status. 1 2 3 4 5 36
  37. 37. TABLE NUMBER PAGE NUMBER 4.1.1 10 4.1.2 11 4.1.3 12 4.1.4 13 4.2.1 14 4.2.2 15 4.2.3 16 4.2.4 17 4.2.5 18 4.2.6 19 4.3.1 20 4.3.2 21 4.3.3 23 4.3.4 24 4.3.5 27 4.3.6 29 4.3.7 30 37
  38. 38. References: 1. http://www.acrwebsite.org/vol-8 2. Shekhar M. Raj (2005) conducted a Study on the Changing Retail Scenario in India 3. www.aima-ind.org/ejournal/articlepdf/jayasrepaper.pdf 4. “International Journal Of Retail & distribution management”, Volume 25, November 11, 1997, Emerald Group Publishing Limited 38

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