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Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom
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Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom

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Presented in the form of a 45-minute social studies class session, this workshop will utilize before, …

Presented in the form of a 45-minute social studies class session, this workshop will utilize before,
during, and after reading strategies designed to actively engage learners in both content and skill instruction, providing participants with an opportunity to actively participate in hands-on literacy strategies that they can take back and use immediately in their own classrooms.

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  • 1. Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom Presented By: Scott Garren Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies Wake County Public School System & Dr. Denise Vargas Social Studies Department Chair Wake County Public School System for the North Carolina Middle School Association Sheraton Greensboro Hotel/Koury Convention Center, Room: Augusta A 3/15/2011 10:00 AM – 11:00 AMPresented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 2. 2/4/2011 North Carolina Middle School Association March 15, 2011 10:00 – 11:0 amWhat good readers do… Use reading strategies before, during, and after reading Set a purpose Access prior knowledge Read ahead Paraphrase and predict Reread, skim, and summarize Identify patterns Use graphic organizers Sequence events Instruction for All Students, pg. 15• Brainstorming• Anticipation Guide• Think Aloud 1
  • 3. 2/4/2011Brainstorming Students work in pairs to brainstorm background knowledge about an assigned topic. Participant “A” talks about the topic for one minute. Participant “B” listens quietly, offering nonverbal encouragement. After one minute, the roles reverse. At the conclusion of the activity, students are prepared for a more in-depth study of the topic. Your Topic: What led to the American Revolution?Anticipation Guides • Establishes purpose and accesses prior knowledge. • A set of statements that relate to the key ideas and major concepts in the selection. • Before reading text students indicate whether they agree or disagree with each statement. • Students then revisit the statements after reading text, discussing where they found information that supported or contradicted their original ideas. • Anticipation guides lead to great conversations both before and after a learning activity.Find the handout… 2
  • 4. 2/4/2011Find the handout…Think Aloud Model the reading process by selecting and reading text aloud to the class. As you read, verbalize your thoughts, feelings, etc. about the text. In other words, think out loud. After reading, ask students to identify the reading comprehension strategies you used in making sense of the text. Encourage students to use these same strategies in reading additional materials.• Free Write• Highlighting• Story Boards• Interactive Notebooks• Interactive Response 3
  • 5. 2/4/2011 Free Writes  Free writes can be written in the form of questions, statements bullet points, etc. The emphasis is on the generation of ideas, not writing norms.  As students read, they make notes along the margins of the text or on another sheet of paper.  After completing the free-write, students may be asked to share what they have written in small groups or with the class. Highlighting  In order to be effective, highlighting should be directed toward specific topics.  Choose important categories and assign a highlighter color to each.  Instruct participants to read the assigned text.  As they read, they highlight information using a separate color for each category.  When the activity is completed, participants have a color-coded text identifying key points about the assigned topics. Story Boards Students read the passage. Either during or after they have read the passage, they brainstorm images to represent key terms, figures, or events that are taking place. They then sketch those images into a pre-determined template or one of their choosing. 4
  • 6. 2/4/2011Interactive Notebooks Students take notes, such as two-column notes, on the right side of the notebook. Students then process that information on the left side of the notebook by drawing pictures, creating collages, writing first-hand accounts, etc.Interactive Response  As they read, students select passages that they find difficult or particularly important.  They write these passages in the right column.  Students then respond to the passages in the left column.• Inside-Outside Circles• Think-Pair-Share• Collaborative Summarizing• Muddiest Point 5
  • 7. 2/4/2011Inside – Outside Circles Write important vocabulary words, key terms, people, etc. on index cards. Distribute the cards to students and split the class into two groups. Instruct students from the first group to form a circle with participants facing outward. Ask the second group to form a circle around the first, facing inward. Instruct students in the inner circle that they are to speak about the topics on their cards to their partner for one minute. Then, instruct the second student to do the same. After two minutes, ask students in the outer circle to rotate to the next person. Continue the exercise for as long as the students are engaged.Think – Pair – Share Ask a question or assign a reading. Ask students to think quietly for a short time (1 minute) about the topic. Instruct students to pair with a partner and share their thoughts with one another. Ask students to share their pair’s responses with the whole group.Collaborative Summarizing Participants are presented with a video, text, or some other form of information. As they watch, listen, or read, participants take notes in the left column of the handout about what they observe. After interacting with the information, participants pair together and share what they observed, recording their partner’s observations in the right column of the handout. After recording each other’s notes, participants work together to summarize and record what they have learned. 6
  • 8. 2/4/2011Muddiest Point  What is your muddiest point?  What is still unclear to you?  Where do you need clarification or additional information?For more information:Scott Garren sgarren@wcpss.netDr. Denise Vargas dvargas@wcpss.net 7
  • 9. Name: ____________________ Anticipation Guide Before reading: Indicate whether you agree (A) or disagree (D) with the following statements. Opinion Statement 1 _____ After the French were defeated by the Native Americans in the French and Indian War, the American colonies took over lands west of the Appalachians. 2 _____ In the 1760s, American colonists were forbidden to settle west of the Appalachian Mountains. 3 _____ Colonists were forced to give up their homes to soldiers. 4 _____ Colonists were forced to allow soldiers to search them whenever and wherever soldiers pleased. 5 _____ Colonists were forced to marry soldiers who wished to settle in the colonies. 6 _____ Colonists were forced to feed hungry soldiers. 7 _____ Colonists were forced to pay the British taxes on anything they imported, even if it didn’t come from Britain. 8 _____ The Boston Massacre was started by the British soldiers when they invaded Boston Harbor. 9 _____ The Declaration of Independence was written, in part, by Benjamin Franklin. 10 ____ After Viewing: If your answer was proven correct according to the presentation, put a check under the “Support” column. If your answer was proven incorrect according to the presentation, put a check under the “No Support” column. In either case, indicate the evidence that you used in checking your answer. Support No Support Evidence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 10. Name: ____________________ The American Revolution Steps toward War The Proclamation of 1763 An Act banning colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains, the Proclamation of 1763 angered many colonists who felt they had a right to these lands after fighting for them in the French and Indian War. In addition to this law, Britain began passing a series of taxes aimed at forcing the colonists to pay for the conflict. The Quartering Act (1765) One year later, parliament passed the Quartering Act. The purpose of the Quartering Act was to save money. To enforce the Proclamation of 1763, Britain kept about 10,000 soldiers in the colonies. The act required colonists to quarter, or house, troops and provide them with food and other supplies. The colonists protested angrily. Once again, the colonists complained that Parliament was violating their rights. Writs of Assistance (1767) The Townshend Acts set up a system to enforce the new import duties. To help customs officers find illegal goods, they were allowed to use writs of assistance, court orders that allowed officials to make searches without saying for what they were searching. Many colonists saw these writs and searches as yet another violation of their writes. The Boston Massacre (1770) On March 5, 1770, in Boston, an angry crowd of workers and sailors surrounded a small group of soldiers. They shouted at the soldiers and threw snowballs and rocks at them. The frightened soldiers fired into the crowd, killing five and wounding six. The Declaration of Independence (1776) In response to the harsh treatment of the colonies by the British, Thomas Jefferson was charged with writing a document declaring the colonies’ independence from Britain. Although he wrote the vast majority of the document himself, final edits were made by both Benjamin Franklin and John Adams.Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 11. Name: ____________________ The Gettysburg Address (excerpt) Four score and seven years ago our forefathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing wether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives so that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 12. Name: ____________________ Story Board Notes Name of Text: Story Board Notes SummaryPresented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 13. Name: ____________________ Interactive Notebooks Left Page Right Page Nonlinguistic Representations, etc. Main Ideas Notes SummaryPresented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 14. Name: ____________________ Interactive Response Direct quote or summary from source. Student Response This reminds me of. . . I predict. . . I am confused. . . I think this means. . . I wonder. . Boy, this makes me feel. . . I wonder. . . Well, in my opinion. . .Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 15. Name: ____________________ Think-Pair-Share What “I” Think What “We” Think What “They” ThinkPresented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 16. Name: ____________________ Collaborative Summarizing Topic _________________________________________________________________ Complete on your own DURING and AFTER the activity. Complete with a partner AFTER the activity. My Ideas My Partner’s Ideas Compare your notes and write a summary statement with you partner. Our IdeasPresented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 17. Name: ____________________ Muddiest Point Topic:Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net
  • 18. Name: ____________________ Literacy Strategies in the Social Studies Classroom 3/15/11 10:00 – 11:00 Sheraton Greensboro Hotel/Koury Convention Center, Room: Augusta A +Presented by:Scott Garren – Coordinating Teacher for Middle School Social Studies, WCPSS & Dr. Denise Vargas – Social Studies Department Chair, WCPSSsgarren@wcpss.net dvargas@wcpss.net

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