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Children in media world natasa m. kejzar

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Children in Media World

Children in Media World

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  • We use the term “new media” to describe a media ecology where more traditional media, such as books, television, and radio, are “converging” with digital media, specifically interactive media and media for social communication.Digital media and online communication have become pervasive in the lives of ourchildren. Social network sites, online games, video-sharing sites, and gadgets such as iPods and mobile phones are now fixtures of children culture. They have so permeated children lives that it is hard to believe that less than a decade ago these technologies had barely registered in the lives of children and teens. Today’s youth may be coming of age and struggling for autonomy and identity as did their predecessors, but they are doing so amid reconfigured contexts for communication, friendship, play, and self-expression.
  • Whenwe are talkingaboutourchildren‘s typicalday, whatwecansay? Doesanybodyhavechildren? What is her/histypicalday? Howdoeshe/shespendtheday?
  • Do weunderstandmedia influence on children? Howthisenviromentchangeandthe most importantquestion is how it changesourchildren?
  • Messing around with new media requires an interest-driven orientation and is supported by access to online resources, media production resources, and a social context for sharing of media knowledge and interests. Online and digital media provide unique supports for tinkering and self-exploration. When something piques their interest, given access to the Internet, young people can easily look around online.
  • AUT zakon določa, da bodo imeli otroci v Avstriji po novem tablične računalnike pri pouku
  • Boomer Parents are more likely to agree than Gen-Y Parents:My Child Helps Introduce Me To New Media And TechnologiesThe Amount Of Access That Websites Like Facebook And Twitter Have To User Information Make Them Dangerous*Technology Has Made The World More Dangerous For KidsGen-Y Parents are more likely to agree than Boomer Parents:I Believe That Websites Like Facebook And Twitter Are Fads And Will Be Replaced With The Next New Thing Online*I Have Checked The Text Messages On My Child’s Cell Phone^My Child And I Are Friends On A Social Network*I Monitor The Privacy Settings On My Child's Page On Social Network Sites Such As Facebook, MySpace And Twitter*My Child Influences The Media and Technology Purchases Of My FamilyTechnology Has Made The World Safe For KidsTechnology Has Made Our Family Life Easier
  • Much of their new media engagement occurs in the context of home and family life. Not surprisingly, parents, siblings, and other family members use media together while they are hanging out at home. Although gaming and television watching were the most pervasive shared family activities, one of the most interesting developments involved families who created digital projects together. In these instances, kids take advantage of the media available at home and get help from their parents with some of the more technical aspects of the devices. Among middle-class families the tools were often digital cameras, video cameras, and other editing software, and parents (typically fathers) often mobilized around their kids by trying to learn about and buy new things. We also found that kids in many families play an important role as the technology “expert” or “broker,” interpreting web sites and other forms of information for their parents.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Children in Media World Experiences in the new Media Ecosystem 1
    • 2. NEW MEDIA ECOSYSTEM AND TEHNOLOGIES BROUGHT ABOUT….. …a substantial change in the experience of childhood in our society. These changes leave us unprepared for the challenge on behaviour and daily time spent of children. 2
    • 3. A Typical Day for Kids aged 6-12 3
    • 4. Media activities continue to make up more than a quarter of a 6-12 year-old’s waking day 24 Hr Day Daily Time Spent by Activity Aggregates (Hrs) Total Hours 24.0 hrs 24.0 hrs 3.6 3.7 2.8 2.6 7.1 7.2 10.6 10.5 W3, 2011 Media W4, 2012 Leisure Non-Leisure Sleeping LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. eDiary; Among kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012. 4
    • 5. Kids’ multitasking activities add over 3 hours to their day; Media multitasking adds nearly an hour and a half Extended Day With Multi-tasking Daily Time Spent by Activity Aggregates (Hrs) Total Hours Media 27.3 hrs 27.3 hrs 5.0 5.0 3.9 3.7 7.8 8.0 10.6 W3, 2011 Time spent eating, playing with toys and with friends are down 10.5 W4, 2012 Leisure Non-Leisure Sleeping +1.3 media multi-tasking hrs Note: Sleeping as a secondary activity is not included LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. eDiary; Among kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012. Time spent at school and traveling are up 5
    • 6. Kids Consume a Wide Variety of Media Options Video accounts for over 50% of media consumption for kids Extended Day With Multi-tasking Daily Time Spent By Media Activities (Hrs) Total Hours Using An App Listening To Radio/Music 5.0 hrs 0.5 0.1 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.9 0.7 0.4 0.1 0.4 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.3 Reading Playing Video Games Going Online Watching Video Online Watching DVD/Blu-ray 5.0 hrs Watching Streamed Video To TV Watching VOD 1.9 1.8 W3, 2011 Watching DVR Video Activities (Net) 2.7 hrs for W3 and W4 W4, 2012 Watching Live TV Note: Using An App and Watching Streamed Video To TV were introduced in 2012, they are not in the 2011 survey. LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. eDiary; Among kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012. 6
    • 7. Their Ever-Changing Media Environment 7
    • 8. NEW MEDIA ENVIROMENT CAUSES… …A CHANGE IN BAHAVIOR and A CHANGE IN THINKING Thoughts create feelings Behavior reinforces thoughts Feelings create behavior 8
    • 9. Increased Online Access Across A Multitude of Devices Mobile devices exhibit strong growth Devices Family/Child Own 79% 81% Among Parents of Kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012 79% 80% W3, 2011 66% W4, 2012 69% 37% 27% 30% 26% 17% 16% 17% 10% 16% 11% 8% n/a Laptop Computer Desktop Computer Cell Phone That Can Access The Internet Tablet Computer iPod Touch eReader Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Parents A&U; Base provided above. Netbook Web Enabled TV 6% 8% Internet Digital Media Enabled Receiver Home Appliance 9
    • 10. Coincidentally, devices without internet capabilities have shown declines in ownership Among families with kids 6-12, n=2,118 Devices Family/Child Own Increases In Device Decreases In Decreases Ownership In Device Device 2012 Ownership Ownership vs. 2012 2011 vs. 2011 iPod (not iPod Touch) 32% (-7 pts) Other MP3 Player 39% (-7 pts) CD Player 68% (-7 pts) Cell Phone That Cannot Access The Internet 48% (-6 pts) Digital Camera 83% (-4 pts) Handheld Gaming Device 62% (-4 pts) Video Camera 50% (-4 pts) DVD Player 90% (-3 pts) Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Parents A&U; Base provided above. 10
    • 11. Changing behaviors follow new device acquisition Access To Video Content Watched With Child Among Parents of Kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012 W3, 2011 W4, 2012 34% 32% 22% 20% Streaming Video Content To Computer 28% 24% Streaming Online Video Content To TV 22% DVD/Blu-Ray Rental Service Through The Mail 25% In-Store DVD/Blu-Ray Rental More kids 6-12 are reading digitally. 28% (vs. 20% in 2011) have read a book or magazine digitally (i.e., eReader or tablet). Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Parents A&U; Base provided above. 11
    • 12. Mobile Kids Aged 6-12 12
    • 13. Ownership of iPhone and Android-based phones is increasing while that of cell phones that cannot access the internet is decreasing among kids 6-12 Cell phone types kids 6-12 own (2012 vs. 2011) Among child cell phone owners, n=666 Cell Phone That Cannot Access The Internet: Other Cell Phone That Can Access The Internet: 47% (-10pts) 31% of kids 6-12 own a cell phone 6-8 Year Olds: 16%* 9-10 Year Olds: 34% 11-12 Year Olds: 54%* 21% (-2pts) iPhone: 13% (+5pts) Android Phone: 13% (+7pts) *Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; *Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. Blackberry: 6% (even) 13
    • 14. Mobile phone entertainment experiences are on the rise Child – Mobile Usage: Selected Activities Among Child Cell Phone Owners, n=666 for 2012 27% Playing Games 21% Listening To Music 12% Browsing/Surfing… 13% Instant Messaging 10% Watching Videos 8% Downloading Music Downloading… Updating Social… 8% Video Messaging 5% W3, 2011 17% 15% Talking (75%) and Texting (64%) are still the top activities on a cell phone, but both have seen a -3pt drop from 2011 12% 10% 9% 7% 8% 27% W4, 2012 14% 8% Downloading Videos 18% 34% 73% of parents whose child owns a cell phone say they “Have checked the messages on my child’s cell phone” Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. 14
    • 15. Apps facilitate mobile entertainment across devices Top apps on kid’s mobile device Among cell phone, iPod Touch, Tablet owners, n=980 Games (57%) Social Networking(20%) Music/Radio (33%) Education (17%) Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Bases provided above. Video (21%) Sport (10%) 15
    • 16. The Media Experience Hierarchy for Kids 6-12 16
    • 17. Which is your “favorite” favorite? Kids’ activity affinity Among kids 6-12, n=2,118 Boys: 42% Girls: 12% Playing Video Games (28%) Spending time with favorite people (24%) Watching favorite TV show (19%) Listening to Radio Station (2%) Boys: 17% Girls: 32% Watching favorite movie at Movie Theatre (5%) Listening to favorite music (5%) 6-8 Year Olds: 22% 11-12 Year Olds: 13% Going Online to favorite Website (9%) Reading favorite book (7%) Boys: 4% Girls: 11% Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U. 17
    • 18. What’s Your Desert Island Device? If you were going to a desert island and could only take one device, which one would you take? DESKTOP COMPUTER (11%) LAPTOP (23%) TV (13%) HANDHELD GAMING DEVICE (9%) GAMING CONSOLE (12%) MP3 PLAYER/IPOD TOUCH (8%) CELL PHONE that can access Internet (11%) TABLET COMPUTER (6%) Device Selected to Take to a Desert Island Among kids 6-12, n=2,118 LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. 18
    • 19. Boys are far more likely to choose gaming devices and girls are more likely to choose a cell phone that can access the internet if stranded on a desert island Device Selected to Take to a Desert Island Boys 6-12 Girls 6-12 20% 16% 11% 7% 6% 4% Gaming Console Handheld Gaming Device Cell Phone That Can Access The Internet Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Among Boys 6-12 n=1,101, Girls 6-12 n=1,017. 19
    • 20. Older kids (11-12) are more likely to choose their laptop and cell phone that can access the internet while younger kids are more likely to choose their TV and handheld gaming device if stranded on a desert island Device Selected to Take to a Desert Island 6-8 Year Olds 9-10 Year Olds 11-12 Year Olds 29% 24% 20% 18% 12% 11% 8% 5% TV 17% 8% 10% 4% Handheld Gaming Device Laptop Computer Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Among kids 6-8 n=932, kids 9-10 n=614, kids 11-12 n=572. Cell Phone That Can Access The Internet 20
    • 21. Boredom Busters Where do you go to when you are bored? Among Kids 6-12, n=2,118 TV (35%) Boys: 31% Girls: 40% COMPUTER (20%) GAMING CONSOLE (17%) Boys: 25% BOOK/MAGAZINE/NEWSPAPER (9%) HANDHELD GAMING DEVICE (7%) MP3 PLAYER/IPOD TOUCH (6%) TABLET COMPUTER (3%) Girls: 8% CELL PHONE (3%) When bored… • Girls are more likely to turn to TV than boys • Boys are more likely to access their gaming console than girls • Older kids (11-12) are more likely to head to the computer than younger kids (6-8) • Younger kids (6-8) are more likely to turn on the TV than older kids (11-12) Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. 21
    • 22. The Role of Social Media for Kids 6-12 22
    • 23. Definition of Parent Generations Feel technology and social networking are dangerous to their kids. Boomer Parents Born 1946-1964 n=372 in LMX Family, W4 2012 Are more involved in their kid’s social networking and cell phone activities and feel that technology has made their family life safer and easier. Gen Y Parents Born 1980-1997 n=215 in LMX Family, W4 2012
    • 24. 42% of kids 6-12 have visited a social network site; 29% of them have their own social network page Social Network Visitation Did Not Visit A Social Network Site 58% Social Network Visitor Social Network – Own Page Does Not Have A Social Network Page Has A Social Network Page 71% 42% Among Kids Who Have Their Own Social Network Page: 29% 69% of kids 6-12 who have visited a social network, have their own page 94% have their own Facebook page 12% have their own Twitter page 11% have their own Google+ page Older kids (11-12 year olds) are highly more likely to have their own social network page 6-8 year olds: 16% 9-10 year olds: 26% 11-12 year olds: 52% Red = significantly lower than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than kids 6-12 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Among kids 6-12 n=2,118, kids who have their own page n=611. 24
    • 25. 72% of kids who have their own social network page visit their page at least daily Social Network Frequency Among Kids 6-12 Who Have Their Own Social Network Page, n=611 Less Than Once A Day 28% Once A Day 32% 2-5 Times A Day 27% 6+ Times A Day 12% 82% of parents whose kids 6-12 have their own social network page monitor their activities (The Privacy Settings On Social Network Sites Such As Facebook, MySpace And Twitter) LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. 25
    • 26. Favorite social network activities See What Other People Are Writing 58% Play Games 57% Like Things 54% Post Updates 43% Post Pictures 39% Email Find Video, Music, Something To Read Answer Quizzes, Fun Questions Share A Video Or Music Link Share A Link 27% 24% 20% 19% 16% LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. Older kids (11-12 year olds) are more likely to ‘See What Other People Are Writing and Post Updates’ than younger kids (6-8 year olds) 26
    • 27. Parent and Child Media Engagement 27
    • 28. Parents have gone online while watching TV with their kids. 43% parent have gone Online while watching TV LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Child A&U; Bases provided above. 28
    • 29. What are parent TOP Online activity while watching TV? Among Parents Who Gone Online While Watching TV with Kid 0-12, n=1,192 for 2012 W3, 2011 89% 87% 70% W4, 2012 66% 55% 46% 34% 34% 36% 33% 30% 28% 23% 23% Personal Email Visit Social Networks Visit Other Websites, Not Related To What's Being Watched On TV Play Games Alone Instant Message/Chat With Friends/Family Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Child A&U; Bases provided above. 26% 21% Work Related School Related Visit Websites E-mail E-mail Related To What's Being Watched On TV 29
    • 30. What about kids? What are they doing while watching TV? 77% 77% W3, 2011 W4, 2012 36% 37% 24% 26% 21% 19% 15% 16% 14% 14% 12% 11% 13% 11% 11% n/a Top Online Activities Done by Kids 6-12 while Watching TV*: • • • • • 62% Play games by themselves 32% Visit websites 30% Browse social networks 28% Play games with others 24% Online activities for school Among Kids 6-12, n=2,118 for 2012 Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level *Among Kids 6-12 who gone online while watching TV, n=788. LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Child A&U; Base provided above. 30
    • 31. How it all begins: PRESCHOOLERS 31
    • 32. Preschoolers are growing up in households with more access to devices that provide opportunities to engage with media Device Ownership* In a Preschooler’s house, you’ll find more… Laptops 83% vs. 79% Handheld Gaming Devices 37% vs. 22% Gaming Consoles 76% vs. 60% Cell Phone With Internet Access 73% vs. 67% iPod Touch 23% vs. 18% …than in a 6-12 year-old’s house. *“Ownership” denotes Family owns the media device. Green = significantly higher than 6-12 year olds at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 4, 2012. Parent A&U; Among parents of preschoolers, n=684 and parents of kids 6-12, n=2,118. 32
    • 33. Preschool households are increasingly owning more new tech devices. Tablet computers, in particular, have seen a large increase. Preschool Household – Family Owns Among Parents of Preschoolers, n=684 W3, 2011 73% 69% 39% 34% W4, 2012 55% of preschoolers whose family owns a tablet allow them to use it 29% 20%23% 20% 15% 7% Cell Phone That Can Access The Internet Blu-Ray Player Tablet Computer (Net) 15% 11% 9% 5% 8% 3-D TV Digital Media Receiver 3% iPod Touch eReader Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Waves 3 & 4, 2012. Parent A&U; Base provided above. Web Enabled TV 5% 7% Digital Video Streaming Device 33
    • 34. Preschooler behavior changes with access to new devices Preschooler - Participation In Activities Wave 3 2011 Playing With Toys Playing Outside Watching DVDs Watching Regular TV Listening To The Radio Reading A Book/Magazine Listening To Music On CDs Listening To Music On A Computer Watching TV Recorded On A DVR Playing With Electronic Educational Games Playing Video Games On A Console Watching Streamed Video To TV Listening To Music On An MP3 Player Watching TV Using Video On Demand Playing Games On A Cell Phone Going Online Playing Video Games On A Handheld Gaming Device Watching Videos On A Cell Phone Playing Games On A Tablet Computer Watching Videos On A Tablet Computer Wave 4 2012 89% 76% 69% 70% 60% 66% 58% 36% 35% 36% 31% 22% 17% 14% 26% 18% 10% - 83% 69% 59% 58% 58% 56% 46% 36% 31% 31% 29% 25% 21% 21% 21% 18% 18% 17% 11% 10% Red = significantly lower than 2011 at the 95% confidence level; Green = significantly higher than 2011 at the 95% confidence level LMX Family (U.S. Online Consumers) Wave 3 2011 & Wave 4 2012. Preschool A&U; Among preschoolers, n=684 for 2012. 34
    • 35. Key Takeaways Conclusion 35
    • 36. Digital natives vs digital immigrants Many parents and teachers are surprised by children’s need for adult support because they feel so strongly that in the realm of technology, kids are way ahead of them. DIGITAL NATIVES (kids who have grown up with digital media and feel at home using them) DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS (the adults who can acquire fluency using digital media but generally do so more slowly and with greater effort) (Prensky, 2001) 36
    • 37. Interactive impacts Children establish communities and adapt technology to their needs…. AND …driving the market and the development and refinement of cyber communication devices.
    • 38. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT US! mag. Nataša Mohorč Kejžar Research Director, Strategic Consulting @: natasa.mohorckejzar@ipsos.com m: +386 (0) 51 683 905