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Kids and Social Media: Raising Free-Range Kids in a Digital Age

This presentation is for fathers and mothers who have children ages 1-18 and discusses issues surrounding human and technology interaction, specifically on adolescents.

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Kids and Social Media: Raising Free-Range Kids in a Digital Age

  1. 1. Kids and Social Media Raising Free-Range Kids in a Digital Age
  2. 2. Kids and Social Media The iPhone came out in 2007, which marks an entry to digital usage among kids and teenagers for the next decade. 2
  3. 3. Smartphone Adoption A survey of more than 5,000 American teens found that 75% of teens owned an iPhone in 2017. Statista found that Google Android and Apple iPhones have taken over 98% of the US market from April 2017 and onward for ages 13 and up. 3
  4. 4. The igeneration is our only study data More likely to be called Gen Z, psychologist and researcher, Jean M. Twenge, calls them iGen or the iGeneration. Born between 1995 and 2012, these teenagers and children have used digital technology or social media since adolescence. Given their large increase in screen time we’ve seen negative and positive changes. What have we seen? What do studies of iGen’s tech use spell out for today’s kids? 4
  5. 5. Less Sleep ● It’s stagnant and then we see a jump ~2012. Is it because kids had phones at younger ages and then we saw delayed effects? ● “Fifty-seven percent more teens were sleep deprived in 2015 than in 1991. In just the four years from 2012 to 2015, 22 percent more teens failed to get seven hours of sleep.” 5
  6. 6. Hanging out with friends, irl ● Less in-person social contact with others ● Does that mean reduced communication in the household too? ● “The number of teens who get together with their friends nearly every day dropped by more than 40 percent from 2000 to 2015; the decline has been especially steep recently.” 6
  7. 7. Smartphone > driver’s licenses A positive note: teens are less likely to be in a car wreck as a result. Ever experience this gif or dread of it? 7
  8. 8. Loneliness ● Is this because they see others hanging out on social media? Yes, it adds to unhappiness. ● “Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy.” - NIDA Results 8
  9. 9. Speech Development "Our study demonstrated that in 18-month-old children, an increase in 30 minutes per day in mobile media device use was associated with a 2.3 times increased risk of parent-reported expressive speech delay but not an increased risk of other parent-reported communication delays. Almost a quarter (22.4%) of the 18-month-old children used mobile media devices on a daily basis, with a median duration of 15.7 minutes per day. Our findings address a gap in the literature on mobile media device use in 18-month-old children and its association with communication delays." Citation: van Den Heuvel, Meta, Julia Ma, Cornelia Borkhoff, Christine Koroshegyi, David Dai, Patricia Parkin, Jonathon Maguire, and Catherine Birken. “Mobile Media Device Use Is Associated with Expressive Language Delay in 18-Month-Old Children.” Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics 40, no. 2 (February 1, 2019): 99–104. http://search.proquest.com/docview/2188556972/. 9
  10. 10. Homicide vs suicide “Teens who spend three hours a day or more on electronic devices are 35 percent more likely to have a risk factor for suicide, such as a suicide plan.” - Jean M. Twenge “As teens have started spending less time together, they have become less likely to kill one another, and more likely to kill themselves. In 2011, for the first time in 24 years, the teen suicide rate was higher than the teen homicide rate” - Jean M. Twenge Jean M. Twenge 10
  11. 11. Correlation doesn’t mean Causation Yes, these are trends and are collinear! So are the silly ones to the right... Is there a causal relationship between smartphones and kids? In 60 years we will know. But you have to decide now. Research and experts always have lagging information, but smartphones are a new trend. Unfortunately, this one is on you: is consumption vs. creation what’s at stake for your child? 11
  12. 12. Listen to your heart 12
  13. 13. What are parent’s fears For kids? 13
  14. 14. Top 3 social media fears 1. Violence in social media a. Great, but what about the teenage trends showing violence to themselves rather than others? 2. Sexual content in social media a. A good concern, yet in teenagers we are seeing drops in sexual activity over the last decade. 3. Spending too much time on social media a. From the previous slides, I think this might move to #1. 14
  15. 15. Want to be a great digital age parent? Research indicates you probably already are, if you’re reading this in the first place! 15
  16. 16. What Psychologists have found on Parenting & Depression A meta analysis on parenting and its effect on children’s depression “...challenge the prevailing assumption that parenting plays a major role in determining the psychological well-being of children. The theoretical models referenced above all suggest that parenting plays a central role in childhood symptomatology, yet the available meta-analytic evidence suggests otherwise. Parenting appears to account for a relatively small proportion of the [depression] variance, at least in terms of a direct effect. In contrast, using behavioral genetic methods, twin and adoption studies find a large role for additive genetic variance in children's depression." - McLeod, B. D., Weisz, J. R., & Wood, J. J. (2007) 16
  17. 17. Therapists and Technologists for You At Pinwheel, we have resources for you! Our advisory board has licensed therapists and psychologists as well as software technologists who care about your children and you. 17
  18. 18. SIgn Up to Get more! If you want similar content we’d love to share it with you. Click Here to sign up! Reply any time! A real human reads it, and we prioritize studies, research, Q&A, podcasts, and videos based on both what we see in the clinic and what you folks raise as concerns. 18
  19. 19. A Parting Gift: Twitter accounts you may Enjoy 19
  20. 20. References Slide 2: comScore. "Subscriber share held by smartphone operating systems in the United States from 2012 to 2019." Chart. November 15, 2019.Statista. https://www-statista-com.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/statistics/266572/market-share-held-by-smartphone-platforms-in-the-united -states/. Twenge, J. M. (2017). Have smartphones destroyed a generation. The Atlantic, 3. Slide 4-8: Twenge, J. M. (2017). Have smartphones destroyed a generation. The Atlantic, 3. Slide 9: van Den Heuvel, Meta, Julia Ma, Cornelia Borkhoff, Christine Koroshegyi, David Dai, Patricia Parkin, Jonathon Maguire, and Catherine Birken. “Mobile Media Device Use Is Associated with Expressive Language Delay in 18-Month-Old Children.” Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics 40, no. 2 (February 1, 2019): 99–104. http://search.proquest.com/docview/2188556972/. Slide 10: Twenge, J. M. (2017). Have smartphones destroyed a generation. The Atlantic, 3. Slide 13-14: Common Sense Media; Various sources (VJR Consulting), The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Kids Age Zero to Eight. Pg. 40. United States; January 20 to February 10, 2017, 0-8 years; 1,454. Slide 16: McLeod, B. D., Weisz, J. R., & Wood, J. J. (2007). Examining the association between parenting and childhood depression: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 27(8), 986-1003. Slide 19: “Most influential parenting-related Twitter accounts in the United States as of 2018. Brandwatch. July 2018. brandwatch.com 20

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