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Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions
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Putting Fun and Fundamentals into Your Functions

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Providing High-Value Programs and Events, STC Summit Leadership Day 2013

Providing High-Value Programs and Events, STC Summit Leadership Day 2013

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  • 1. Marilyn WoelkA Really Fun Person1
  • 2.  “If You Build it, Will They Come?” LISTEN & LEARN AssessmentFind customer demand via surveys, suggestions, and datafrom past events Scoping◦ Attendance projections (size/target/competition)◦ P & L projections (baseline, upside, downside) Venue arrangements◦ Food, entertainment, raffles, presentations2
  • 3.  Are you authorized to sign the contract? Didyou look closely at ALL fees? EXAMINE:◦ Room, furniture, and linen fees (specify setup)◦ Food costs and gratuity (tax exempt)◦ Server fees for bar/food setup ($45 per hour?)◦ Presentation fees (internet access, projector,screen)◦ Parking and security fees (provide insurance cert.)◦ Promotional materials/signage fees◦ Coat rack rental/coat room fees3
  • 4.  Watch “Guarantees” (fees for unused food,rooms, etc. based on either “minimums” or“lock-down” dates)◦ A contract is the place to START negotiations! It is a“suggestion” until it is signed.◦ All establishments have policies, but most of themwill be flexible to obtain business.4
  • 5.  Contract negotiations: to succeed in passingthrough, around, or over (as in a hikernegotiating a mountain pass) At its core, a negotiation is reaching anagreement…but sometimes you must getaround or over policies of the venue that donot meet your customer needs.5
  • 6.  Things you might be able to NEGOTIATE:◦ Free hotel rooms for event planners◦ Donations from the venue to put into a raffle◦ Free coffee or tea with a meal◦ Less expensive desserts like cookies (even if thoseare not on the menu)◦ Free use of the event room if you order meals◦ Free speakers if you buy them dinner6
  • 7.  Things you might be able to NEGOTIATE:◦ Better “lock-down” dates (Get these added to yourcontract!) Smaller events (up to 50 people) -- try to lock at24-48 hours in advance. Give updated counts at 7,and 3 days in advance. Final lock 1 day in advance. Larger venues – Give count 2 weeks out, then 1week out. Lock 3-4 days before event.7
  • 8.  Small events - 10 days to 4 weeks in advance. Larger events 2-3 months in advance, withincreasing frequency until day before event.8
  • 9.  Distribution channels:◦ Social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn)◦ Direct e-mail (Sell sheets, EventBrite, membercommunications/newsletters)◦ Media (TV, radio, newspapers, info boards, blogs)◦ STC (my STC, conference web site, chapter/SIG website, personal invitations)9
  • 10.  In all publicity, include:◦ Clean, motivational copy and custom graphics◦ Perceived benefits/ROI (Why should theycome?/Why should they send their employee?)◦ NOTE: It is not enough to sell the attendee on theevent. You must “up-sell” whoever is paying for theevent (the ultimate end–user).10
  • 11.  The perceived value is less than the price. There is no money to spend to get the ROI. There are two good choices, and the competingevent makes a better business case than you do. The competing event is not a business event, it is apersonal one. The weather is bad.11
  • 12.  Your best publicity comes from peoplewho enjoyed past events, so:◦ meet everyone who attends your events ifpossible,◦ help guests meet others who will buildpersonal and business connections withthem, and◦ make your events fun as well as educational.12
  • 13.  Negotiate the best value you can provide for aquality event. People remember a good mealspent with “friends.” Warm chocolate chip cookies will make you ahero! Good-bye, good luck…and let’s have fun outthere!13
  • 14.  Marilynw@wingzcreative.com Marilyn.woelk@gmail.com @bluestoneriver 585-899-0167 cell14
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