Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Lecture 5 a_radiographic_presentation_2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Lecture 5 a_radiographic_presentation_2012

984
views

Published on

This is a basic lecture to help dental students at all levels with basic interpretation

This is a basic lecture to help dental students at all levels with basic interpretation

Published in: Health & Medicine

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
984
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
55
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Dr MUMENA C.H
  • 2. * Dental radiographs are used in combination with the clinical examination to identify pathologic conditions and anomalies* Prerequisite for interpretation: careful exposure and processing technique * Reason: avoid errors that inhibit interpretation of radiographs* Preferred technique: Paralleling technique * Reason: radiographs are most accurate representation of real structure* Prerequisite for interpretation: Understanding normal structures before identifying anomaly or pathology
  • 3. * Normal radiographic appearance of tooth and surrounding anatomic structures:
  • 4. * Rec anatomy of tooth (Enamel, dentine, cementum, pulp)* Enamel appears more lighter (More radiopaque) than dentine * Reason: it is the most dense substance in the body * It should appear unbroken by any radiolucency (Dark areas)
  • 5. * Cementum: * Covers rooth area * Does not appear on radiographs * Reasons: * It is very thin layer * Density is similar to dentine
  • 6. * Dentin: * Underlies the enamel and cementum * Dentin should appear smooth and unbroken by radiolucency except for the pulp chamber and root canals * Junction between enamel and dentin is clear * Reason: * Different densities
  • 7. * Pulp chamber and root canals: * Made up of soft tissues * Appear radiolucent * Size of pulp chamber vary between individuals * Root canal appearance vary * Apical foramen and apical 2-3 mm of the canal may or may not be visible * In developing teeth, pulp chambers and canals are quite large * N.B: Pulp chambers and root canals should not contain radiolucencies
  • 8. * Lamina Dura * It is the radiopaque line that follows the roots of the teeth * Appearance vary depending on root configuration and angulation of the x-ray beam * It may appear well defined or non-existent * In areas of occlusal stress ti will appear thicker and more dense * An interrupted or absent lamina dura in the absence of other signs and symptoms is not necessarily indicative of pathology
  • 9. * Periodontal ligament space: * Radiolucent are between the lamina dura and the root surface * Extends from the alveolar crest around the root(s) to the opposite alveolar crest * Width of periodontal ligament space varies * Features suggesting pathology: * Widening adjacent to the alveolar crest * Widening in the apical area
  • 10. * Cancellous or trabecular bone: * Consists of thin radiopaque plates and rods called trabeculae surrounding the bone marrow * It is sandwiched between the cortical plates of maxilla and mandible * Density and pattern of trabeculae bone vary from individual to individual * General presentation: * Trabecular pattern of maxilla is denser and finer than that of mandible
  • 11. * END OF PART 1: FOLLOW PART 2; RADIOGRAPHIC PRESENTATION OF DENTAL CARIES