• Like
  • Save
artists responses to institutional archives
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Published

paula roush presentation on artists responses to institutional archives …

paula roush presentation on artists responses to institutional archives
part of developing the digital image/ project 2, weeks 9 and 10, march 2011

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
833
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • lphonse Bertillon«Bertillonage»The process developed in 1879/1880 by the criminologist and anthropologist Alphonse Bertillon was founded on the assumption that a person’s body measurements remain relatively unchanged after reaching the age of twenty. Measuring and registering body proportions made a person unquestionably identifiable in the event of subsequent criminal offences. Also introduced at this time, as an obligatory component of the identification process, was the police photograph [mug shot], which held to the rigid practice of photographing offenders en face and en profil. Up until 1905, the Paris Police Department was said to have identified altogether 12,614 repeated offenders with the Bertillonage process, whose complexity also made it prone to miscalculation. The possibility of confusing 11 different, body measurements could not be entirely ruled out. Bertillon’s process was also expensive and time consuming. These flaws led to quickly implementing dactylopy or identifying subjects by their fingerprints, introduced twenty years later. In France as well, Bertillonage was finally abandoned in 1914, after Bertillon’s death. But a few Bertillonage elements exist even today in the criminal police identification process, for example the combination of profile and frontal shots when photographing offenders. In addition, Bertillon’s collection of types of faces and noses form the basis for what were later composite sketches of suspects. 
  • Alphonse Bertillon«Bertillonage»The process developed in 1879/1880 by the criminologist and anthropologist Alphonse Bertillon was founded on the assumption that a person’s body measurements remain relatively unchanged after reaching the age of twenty. Measuring and registering body proportions made a person unquestionably identifiable in the event of subsequent criminal offences. Also introduced at this time, as an obligatory component of the identification process, was the police photograph [mug shot], which held to the rigid practice of photographing offenders en face and en profil. Up until 1905, the Paris Police Department was said to have identified altogether 12,614 repeated offenders with the Bertillonage process, whose complexity also made it prone to miscalculation. The possibility of confusing 11 different, body measurements could not be entirely ruled out. Bertillon’s process was also expensive and time consuming. These flaws led to quickly implementing dactylopy or identifying subjects by their fingerprints, introduced twenty years later. In France as well, Bertillonage was finally abandoned in 1914, after Bertillon’s death. But a few Bertillonage elements exist even today in the criminal police identification process, for example the combination of profile and frontal shots when photographing offenders. In addition, Bertillon’s collection of types of faces and noses form the basis for what were later composite sketches of suspects.
  • Beginning 1877, Francis Galton worked with the process of composite photography to verify and illustrate his study of heredity. This involved exposing an arbitrary number of individual portraits of chosen groups of people on a photographic plate, with the respective exposure time for each image made in relation to the number of used portraits. The overlapping caused the subjects’ individual physiognomic qualities to vanish and accentuated common characteristics of the chosen group. The composite process resulted in producing a slightly blurred image, which, as Galton wrote, «portrayed no specific type of person, but rather an imaginary figure endowed with the average characteristics of a specific group of people. [...] [This] represents the portrait of a type and not of an individual.» Galton’s process was founded on the physiognomic idea that a person’s character and potential could be established through appearance alone. The example shown here – the synthesis of the ‹epitomic Jew,› and the intensification of an archive to a single image – demonstrates the most dangerous effects that combining eugenics with composite photography produces.
  • Scotland Yard memo on suffragettes Lillian Forrester and Evelyn Manesta, 1914.Scotland Yard memo on suffragettes Lillian Forrester and Evelyn Manesta, 1914. The two women had convictions for window breaking and attacking paintings in the Manchester Art Gallery, two forms of direct action carried out by the suffragettes as part of their campaign to secure the vote for women. The photographs were taken while they were imprisoned in Holloway Prison, London, in 1913.
  • As artist-in-residence at the University of Brighton Design Archives, Gabriel Kuri's intervention As Selected for the Design Centre, London moved photography quite literally out of the archive and into the public arena.Taking as his starting point a pristine black and white image from 1956 of domestic tableware from the Design Council Archive, Kuri's project reflected on the immaculate and unsoiled pictorial aesthetic that was characteristic not only of the Design Council's post-war photography but also of an era of unbridled enthusiasm for modernity and progress.Producing an installation that was then replicated and sited at different civic spaces throughout Brighton for the duration of the Biennial, Kuri created an encounter with the past that embraced mass produced objects and the rituals of the everyday.
  • yardstick