Accepting Responsibility For The Learning Of All Students
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Accepting Responsibility For The Learning Of All Students

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How to make sure I meet every student\'s needs in a way that fits with multiple intelligences, personality, and learning styles.

How to make sure I meet every student\'s needs in a way that fits with multiple intelligences, personality, and learning styles.

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Accepting Responsibility For The Learning Of All Students Accepting Responsibility For The Learning Of All Students Presentation Transcript

  • Accepting Responsibility for the Learning of All Students What does it Mean?
  • “Race is tied intricately to class. When we understand this intricate tie that binds us, we begin to see that we do share much common ground in class.” Ronald Takaki
  • Enduring Understanding  Culture, first language, ethnicity and race often allow students to present as abnormal to the teacher who is from the main line culture. It is necessary to understand how these things effect their learning and the disproportionate number of minority students in special ed. If we teach all of these students so they can learn, special education classes should shrink and prejudices should recede into the past.
  • Essential Questions  How are the demographics of public schools changing?  How is the increasing diversity of the student population reflected in special education?  What is the demographic divide, and why is it important?  How can we explain the significant discrepancies in educational outcomes for children who vary by race, culture, socio-economic status, language, and learning differences?  What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children? quoted on page 52 of Special Education for Today’s Teacher An Introduction
  • How are the demographics of public schools changing?  In 2004 (US Census Bureau) US was 67% European American.  In the last two years Hispanic Americans have surpassed African Americans as the largest minority in the US.  At least 4 states now have now majority population by ethnicity.  By 2015 only 58% of the 0 to 24 group will be European American.  By 2025 half of all school children will be of non- European ancestry.
  • How are the demographics of public schools changing?  Over 10% of the student population is classified as English-language Learners and are entitle to general education services to address their limited English proficiency.  The number is disproportionally larger in some regions and it is straining budgets and staffs to meet the needs.  Many of us would not recognize the sounds of our own school hall ways if we went back today, the change is so all pervasive in the US.
  • How are the demographics of public schools changing?  Poverty is increasing.  Poverty is often tied with ethnicity and linguistic differences as those who don’t fit into the norms of our culture often get placed in the worst jobs despite great intelligence and training.  Poverty means teachers will have to learn to look out for signs of poor nourishment to insure that their students can learn well as health has a great impact on ability. Sometimes, if not caught early enough, it results in permanent damage to mind as well as body.
  • How are the demographics of public schools changing?  Neglect and abuse are on the rise.  Neglect often comes with the socio- economic struggles and growing divide in our society.  Neglect has become the greatest form of child abuse in the country today.
  • How is the increasing diversity of the student population reflected in special education?  Overrepresentation  Academic achievement is hindered by being on European American due to resource inequities.  Proportionally more American Indians and African Americans have intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, and emotional/behavior disorders.
  • How is the increasing diversity of the student population reflected in special education?  Students with disabilities are more likely to live in poverty and end up in schools with too few resources to meet their needs.  Type of classroom used for special education is most often integrated for European Americans and in essence segregated (called separated) for the African Americans.  Graduation rates are falling for all but the Asian American students. It is especially true in the special education classroom for the Culturally and Linguistically diverse.
  • The Demographic Divide  It is between teachers and students.  It is most often social and economic.  It leave teachers without enough understanding of the student culture to know when the students are being defiant or being as is culturally acceptable in their society.  Makes it more important to have good teachers from the same culture as role models.  Makes it important to have same culture teachers to help those on the divide know best how to deal with the special needs they don’t normally recognize.
  • The Demographic Divide  We must not think we cannot reach the children on the other side of this divide if we are European Americans. Hard work, proper attention, and learning about the students and their families will do wonders. We need to develop resources to make it happen.  Teachers have to understand what is normal in different cultures. A lot of the students in this multicultural milieu are from more communal cultures that expect far different behaviors in the classroom than our individualistic culture.
  • The Demographic Divide  Educational decisions made on our own views of “normal” may have deleterious results for the education of many of the students coming here from cultures unfamiliar to us.  Teachers have to understand what is normal in different cultures. A lot of the students in this multicultural milieu are from more communal cultures that expect far different behaviors in the classroom than our individualistic culture.
  • How can we explain the significant discrepancies in educational outcomes for children who vary by race, culture, socio-economic status, language, and learning differences?
  • Discrepancies  Deshawn, page 64  Lack of trust in authority in poorer neighborhoods.  Recognizing the difference between defiance and cultural norms does is important but does not require teacher-student cultural parity.  Linguistic divergence can make it hard for parents to inform teachers of physical or psychological needs they know their children have.
  • Discrepancies  If teachers make decisions based on English performance for ESLL students, then they may put very bright students into special education settings that will hurt rather than help. (Josue pg. 66).*  Cultures direct parental interactions with schools as well as those of their children.  Parental expectations for their children may be different from the teachers. * Alternate Homework assignment. Reflect on this student’s teacher’s responses to his needs.
  • Discrepancies  Children who come from poverty often start behind in school and stay there.  Students from diverse backgrounds with disabilities often struggle because the states keep changing expectations and the parents are either working too hard to take time to talk to the teachers or are unable to communicate in English and have given up trying to help their children.  High Stakes Testing is causing its own problems for these students, especially in special education classes.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  They take advantage of the information available in communities that thrive on extended family living.  They use mentors and fellow teachers ideas to become more culturally sensitive and responsive.  They learn all they can about multiple cultures that may be divergent in their behavior standards and work with the students to understand each other rather than set rules that cause tension or make one group seem superior to another.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  They tend to work from a more Interactional model for disabilities and use information from the Medical Model to help get them diagnosed, but not necessarily to teach them.  Use the school environment to foster resilience in the students rather than total defeat.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Know yourself and the role culture plays in perception.  Study culture and diversity  Help our student to think in terms of how different people respond to experiences without going into great cultural studies. Use normal examples like male and female, fat and thin, worker and manager and branch out from there. This should help all in the class become non- judgmental.  Don’t be judgmental.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Make the classroom a caring place.  Make interactions with parents caring events that assure them of your support.  Make opportunities to learn about your students and their backgrounds. Informal observations of students. Informal conversations with parents. Use questionnaires when possible.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Create a sense of community in the classroom.  Teach classroom rules, routines, and procedures explicitly. Never assume that anyone knows what is expected of them. Your cultural may set you to expect something a student has never been required to do in his culture.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Only assume that students will behave appropriately if they know and remember what is expected by the teacher.  Use multiple strategies to teach classroom expectations.  Use humorous negative examples as well as models when setting expectations.  Set high expectations for student achievement. Anyone can learn.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Provide authentic opportunities for students to use newly acquired skills and competencies.  Insist on completion and quality.  Use culturally relevant curriculum and texts.  Link the children’s interests, experiences, families and home cultures to the school work.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Take advantages of traditions like oral history in the African American community.  Take advantage of the things some families do to maintain the family tree and the history of each member. That is a great way to tap the funds of knowledge in a family that doesn’t want to talk to the teacher. Talking to the student about the weekly family tree sessions will bring out much to help the teacher link the classes to that student’s life.
  • What do successful teachers believe and do to enhance the educational futures of all children?  Empower students to seek equity and social justice.  Integrate social justice into the curriculum as the students grow older.  Take advantage of current events to make this happen more readily.  Make ways for students to get involved in social action projects. Then they will believe that they can have an impact on the world.  Make sure they know what equity means.
  • We have to bring the students in our growing and rapidly changing We need to learn to know our students better than ever so American culture we can cross the demographic divide. together in a place where it is safe to be oneself and to learn without fear of not fitting We need to be in. ready to learn and grow and change as much as our students. If we don’t, we will make the divide into an unbridgeable chasm.
  • We have to learn to love our selves and our students We need to be ready to face the pains that living in a poor in wisdom so we neighborhood bring to our students. Poor neighborhoods can meet their often provide poor schools and unsafe environments. problems with These are hard places for children to learn in. Find ways to understanding. make it easier. We need to be aware of family traditions that will become treasure troves of information for us when our students parents are uncomfortable coming in for meetings or can’t find anyone to translate for them. Commit to learning about our students, their backgrounds and their experiences. Then commit to incorporating their lives into our teaching so they can see the value of what they are learning.