Chapter 1. Skill Objectives 1. Determine by observation if a graph is connected. 2. Identify vertices and edges of a giv...
Chapter 1. Skill Objectives (cont’d) 8. If a graph contains an Euler circuit, list one such circuit  by identifying the o...
Chapter 2: Business Efficiency
• Given a collection of cities asThe       well as the cost of travel          between each, we must findProbl     the che...
Arranging school bus routes                      ApplicatDelivery of meals to        ions homebound personsScheduling o...
For All PracticalChapter 2: Business Efficiency                              Purposes          Business Efficiency       ...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyBusiness Efficiency Visiting Vertices   In some graph theory problems, it is only necessar...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Hamiltonian Circuit       A tour that starts and ends at the same vert...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit vs. Euler CircuitsHamiltonian vs. Euler Circuits               Hamiltoni...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Vacation–Planning Problem   Hamiltonian circuit concept is used to fi...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Minimum-Cost Hamiltonian Circuit   A Hamiltonian circuit with the lowe...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Method of Trees   For the first step of the algorithm, a systematic a...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Minimum-Cost Hamiltonian  Circuit: Vacation-Planning  Example 1. Metho...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Principle of Counting                                                  ...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyTraveling Salesman Problem Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP)   Difficult to solve Hamiltoni...
Chapter 2: Business Efficiency Traveling Salesman Problem — Nearest Neighbor  Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (to solve TSP)  ...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyTraveling Salesman Problem — Sorted Edges Sorted Edges Algorithm (to solve TSP)    Start b...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyMinimum-Cost Spanning Trees Minimum-Cost Spanning Trees   Another graph theory optimizatio...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyMinimum-Cost Spanning Trees Kruskal’s Algorithm — Developed by Joseph Kruskal  (AT&T resear...
Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyCritical Path Analysis Critical Path Analysis    Most often, scheduling jobs consists of c...
Order-requirement digraph
Skill Objectives
Skill Objectives (cont’d) 7. Explain the term heuristic algorithm and list both an  advantage and a disadvantage. 8. Dis...
Skill Objectives (cont’d) 13. Give the definition of a tree. 14. Given a graph with edge weights, determine a  minimum-c...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Na ch02

421 views
303 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
421
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Na ch02

  1. 1. Chapter 1. Skill Objectives 1. Determine by observation if a graph is connected. 2. Identify vertices and edges of a given graph. 3. Construct the graph of a given street network. 4. Determine by observation the valence of each vertex of a graph. 5. Define an Euler circuit. 6. List the two conditions for the existence of an Euler circuit. 7. Determine whether a graph contains an Euler circuit.
  2. 2. Chapter 1. Skill Objectives (cont’d) 8. If a graph contains an Euler circuit, list one such circuit by identifying the order in which the vertices are used by the circuit, or by identifying the order in which the edges are to be used. 9. If a graph does not contain an Euler circuit, add a minimum number of edges to ―eulerize‖ the graph. 11. Identify management science problems whose solutions involve Euler circuits.
  3. 3. Chapter 2: Business Efficiency
  4. 4. • Given a collection of cities asThe well as the cost of travel between each, we must findProbl the cheapest way of visiting all the cities and returning to theem starting point • Studying the TSP has led to improved solutions in other math areas • One of the most intensely studied problems • No effective solution is known – $1,000,000 prize from the Clay Mathematics Institute
  5. 5. Arranging school bus routes ApplicatDelivery of meals to ions homebound personsScheduling of a machine to drill holes in a circuit boardGenome sequencingScan chain optimization in computer chipsTrip planning
  6. 6. For All PracticalChapter 2: Business Efficiency Purposes  Business Efficiency  Visiting Vertices-Graph Theory Problem Mathematical Literacy in Today’s World, 8th ed.  Hamiltonian Circuits  Vacation Planning Problem  Minimum Cost-Hamiltonian Circuit  Method of Trees  Fundamental Principle of Counting  Traveling Salesman Problem  Helping Traveling Salesmen  Nearest Neighbor and Sorted Edges Algorithms  Minimum-Cost Spanning Trees  Kruskal’s Algorithm  Critical-Path Analysis© 2009, W.H. Freeman and Company
  7. 7. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyBusiness Efficiency Visiting Vertices  In some graph theory problems, it is only necessary to visit specific locations (using the travel routes, or streets available).  Problem: Find an efficient route along distinct edges of a graph that visits each vertex only once in a simple circuit. Applications:  Salesman visiting particular cities  Delivering mail to drop-off boxes  Route taken by a snowplow  Pharmaceutical representative visiting doctors
  8. 8. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Hamiltonian Circuit  A tour that starts and ends at the same vertex (circuit definition).  Visits each vertex once. (Vertices cannot be reused or revisited.)  Circuits can start at any location.  Use wiggly edges to show the circuit.Starting at vertex A, the tour can be A different circuit visiting each vertexwritten as ABDGIHFECA, or starting at once and only once would beE, it would be EFHIGDBACE. CDBIGFEHAC (starting at vertex C).
  9. 9. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit vs. Euler CircuitsHamiltonian vs. Euler Circuits Hamiltonian circuit – Similarities A tour (showed by  Both forbid re-use. wiggly edges) that  Hamiltonian do not reuse vertices. starts at a vertex of a  Euler do not reuse edges. graph and visits each vertex once and only Differences once, returning to  Hamiltonian is a circuit of vertices. where it started.  Euler is a circuit of edges.  Euler graphs are easy to spot Euler circuit – A circuit (connectedness and even valence). that traverses each  Hamiltonian circuits are NOT as easy edge of a graph to determine upon inspection. exactly once and starts  Some certain family of graphs can be and stops at the same known to have or not have Hamiltonian circuits. point.
  10. 10. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Vacation–Planning Problem  Hamiltonian circuit concept is used to find the best route that minimizes the total distance traveled to visit friends in different cities. (assume less mileage  less gas  minimizes costs) Hamiltonian circuit with weighted edges  Edges of the graph are given weights, or in this case mileage or distance between cities.  As you travel from vertex to vertex, add the numbers (mileage in this case).  Each Hamiltonian circuit will produce a particular sum. Road mileage between four cities
  11. 11. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Minimum-Cost Hamiltonian Circuit  A Hamiltonian circuit with the lowest possible sum of the weights of its edges. Algorithm (step-by-step process) for Solving This Problem 1. Generate all possible Hamiltonian tours (starting with Chicago). 2. Add up the distances on the edges of each tour. 3. Choose the tour of Algorithm – A step-by-step description minimum distance. of how to solve a problem.
  12. 12. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Method of Trees  For the first step of the algorithm, a systematic approach is needed to generate all possible Hamiltonian tours (disregard distances during this step).  This method begins by selecting a starting vertex, say Chicago, and making a tree- diagram showing the next possible locations.  At each stage down, there will be one less choice (3, 2, then 1 choice).  In this example, the method of trees generated six different paths, all starting and ending with Chicago. However, only three are unique circuits. Method of trees for vacation-planning problem
  13. 13. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuits Minimum-Cost Hamiltonian Circuit: Vacation-Planning Example 1. Method of tree used to find all tours (for four cities: three unique paths). On the graph, the unique paths are drawn with wiggly lines. 2. Add up distance on edges of each unique tour. The smallest sum would give us the minimal distance, which is the minimum cost. 3. Choose the tour of minimum distance. The smallest sum would give us the minimal distance, which is the minimum cost. The three Hamiltonian circuits’ sums of the tours
  14. 14. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyHamiltonian Circuit Principle of Counting Complete graph – for Hamiltonian Circuits  For a complete graph of n vertices, there are A graph in (n - 1)! possible routes. which every  Half of these routes are repeats, the result is: pair of vertices Possible unique Hamiltonian circuits are is joined by an edge. (n - 1)! / 2 Fundamental Principle of Counting If there are a ways of choosing one thing, b ways of choosing a second after the first is chosen, c ways of choosing a third after the second is chosen…, and so on…, and z ways of choosing the last item after the earlier choices, then the total number of choice patterns is a b × c × … × z.Example: Jack has 9 shirts and 4 pairs of pants. He can wear 9 × 4 = 36 shirt-pant outfits.
  15. 15. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyTraveling Salesman Problem Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP)  Difficult to solve Hamiltonian circuits when the number of vertices in a complete graph increases (n becomes very large).  This problem originated from a salesman determining his trip that minimizes costs (less mileage) as he visits the cities in a sales territory, starting and ending the trip in the same city.  Many applications today: bus schedules, mail drop- offs, telephone booth coin pick-up routes, etc. How can the TSP be solved?  Computer program can find optimal route (not always practical).  Heuristic methods can be used to find a ―fast‖ answer, but does not guarantee that it is always the optimal answer.  Nearest neighbor algorithm  Sorted edges algorithm
  16. 16. Chapter 2: Business Efficiency Traveling Salesman Problem — Nearest Neighbor  Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (to solve TSP)  Starting from the ―home‖ city (or vertex), first visit the nearest city (one with the least mileage from ―home‖).  As you travel from city to city, always choose the next city (vertex) that can be reached quickest (i.e., nearest with the least miles), that has not already been visited.  When all other vertices have been visited, the tour returns home.Hamiltonian Circuit: Hamiltonian Circuit: A-B-C-E-D-A B-C-A-D-E-B Nearest neighbor starting at vertex A Nearest neighbor starting at vertex B
  17. 17. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyTraveling Salesman Problem — Sorted Edges Sorted Edges Algorithm (to solve TSP)  Start by sorting, or arranging, the edges in order of increasing cost (sort smallest to largest mileage between cities).  At each stage, select that edge of least cost until all the edges are connected at the end while following these rules:  If an edge is added that results in three edges meeting at a vertex, eliminate the longest edge.  Always include all vertices in the finished circuit.Example using sorted edgesEdges selected are DE at 400, BC at500, AD at 550, and AB at 600 (ACand AE are not chosen because theyresult in three edges meeting at A).Lastly, CE at 750 is chosen tocomplete the circuit of 2800 miles.
  18. 18. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyMinimum-Cost Spanning Trees Minimum-Cost Spanning Trees  Another graph theory optimization problem that links all the vertices together, in order of increasing costs, to form a ―tree.‖  The cost of the tree is the sum of the weights on the edges.Example: What is the cost to construct a Pictaphone service (telephone service with video image of the callers) among five cities? The diagram shows the cost to build the connection from each vertex to all other vertices (connected graph). Cities are linked in order of increasing costs to make the connection. Costs (in millions of dollars) The cost of redirecting the signal may be of installing Pictaphone small compared to adding another link. service among five cities
  19. 19. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyMinimum-Cost Spanning Trees Kruskal’s Algorithm — Developed by Joseph Kruskal (AT&T research).  Goal of minimum-cost spanning tree: Create a tree that links all the vertices together and achieves the lowest cost to create.  Add links in order of cheapest cost according to the rules:  No circuit is created (no loops).  If a circuit (or loop) is created by adding the next largest link, eliminate this largest (most expensive link)—it is not needed.  Every vertex must be included in the final tree.
  20. 20. Chapter 2: Business EfficiencyCritical Path Analysis Critical Path Analysis  Most often, scheduling jobs consists of complicated tasks that cannot be done in a random order.  Due to a pre-defined order of tasks, the entire job may not be done any sooner than the longest path of dependent tasks. Order-Requirement Digraph  A directed graph (digraph) that shows which tasks precede other tasks among the collection of tasks making up a job. Critical Path  The longest path in an order-requirement digraph.  The length is measured in terms of summing the task times of the tasks making up the path.An order-requirement digraph, tasksA – E with task times in the circlesCritical Path is BE = 25 + 27 = 52 min.
  21. 21. Order-requirement digraph
  22. 22. Skill Objectives
  23. 23. Skill Objectives (cont’d) 7. Explain the term heuristic algorithm and list both an advantage and a disadvantage. 8. Discuss the difficulties inherent in the application of the brute force method for finding the minimum-cost Hamiltonian circuit. 9. Describe the steps in the nearest-neighbor algorithm. 10. Find an approximate solution to the traveling salesman problem by applying the nearest-neighbor algorithm. 11. Describe the steps in the sorted-edges algorithm. 12. Find an approximate solution to the traveling salesman problem by applying the sorted-edges algorithm..
  24. 24. Skill Objectives (cont’d) 13. Give the definition of a tree. 14. Given a graph with edge weights, determine a minimum-cost spanning tree. 15. Identify the critical path in an order-requirement digraph. 16. Find the earliest possible completion time for a collection of tasks by finding the critical path in an order-requirement digraph. 17. Explain the difference between a graph and a directed graph.

×