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Making Meaning in Content and Design (Bloomstein at HOW)
 

Making Meaning in Content and Design (Bloomstein at HOW)

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How do you rally stakeholders around a unified user experience that’s consistent across design and content? That’s the challenge of a modern designer. Fortunately, content strategy is a powerful ...

How do you rally stakeholders around a unified user experience that’s consistent across design and content? That’s the challenge of a modern designer. Fortunately, content strategy is a powerful ally in that challenge. Amid constrained budgets, tight timelines, and unlimited interaction expectations, can you really add another tool to your toolkit? Can you afford to focus on content too? Yes—and you can’t afford to “let the client worry about it” any longer. We’ll discuss the value content strategy can add to your work and how it can help you streamline your process to save time and keep stakeholders happy. Then, we’ll discuss how to prioritize communication goals and develop a message architecture with a hands-on exercise—ideal whether you’re designing for the web, a mobile app, social media, or an offline experience. Finally, you’ll learn how to create consistency between copy, channels, and the typography and imagery you develop for those channels. There’s meaning in consistency, and you’ll explore how to master it in content and design.

Presented at HOW Interactive Design Conference, #HIDC, November 6, 2013, in Chicago.

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  • Doug, that's a great question. The higher ed industry grapples with many of the challenges and benefits of distributed content creation, but schools that embrace content strategy really seem to be able to run with it. In pockets, the travel and tourism industry seems to really benefit from it as well.
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  • 'message architecture' - good
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  • HI Margot. Thanks for packing so much--concisely--into your presentation. It shows years of experience at work. Any thoughts on which industry groups which truly lead and lag in content strategy? Best wishes, Doug.
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    Making Meaning in Content and Design (Bloomstein at HOW) Making Meaning in Content and Design (Bloomstein at HOW) Presentation Transcript

    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 1 MAKING MEANING IN CONTENT AND DESIGN Margot Bloomstein HOW Interactive Design Conference 110613 @mbloomstein #HIDC MAKING MEANING IN © 2013 CONTENT AND DESIGN
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 3 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 4 What is content strategy? Planning for the creation, aggregation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable, and appropriate content in an experience. © 2013
    • You need this.
    • © narniafans.com @mbloomstein | #HIDC 6 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 7 ©Skillset.org © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 8 Titles < Roles < Skills © 2013
    • © The Creative Group
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 11 Steps along the way… Message architecture Content audit/inventory Prescriptive content matrix Content model Editorial style guidelines Metadata guidelines Governance guidelines © 2013
    • Deliverables are merely punctuation in the conversation. Don’t let them replace the conversation.
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 13 Why content strategy? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 14 Why content strategy? Because we all want the same thing, but content keeps getting in the way. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 15 Why content strategy? Launch on time © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 16 Why content strategy? Stay within budget © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 17 Why content strategy? Maintain a consistent user experience visually and verbally © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 18 Why content strategy? Maintain a consistent user experience visually and verbally, across channels © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 19 Why content strategy? Maintain a consistent user experience visually and verbally, across channels, among platforms and devices © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 20 Why content strategy? Without the team killing each other over differences in opinion and changing goals © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 21 Establish the message architecture. CAN THIS HAPPEN. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 22 More like Apple. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 23 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 24 More like Apple’s “message architecture” Confident but approachable; accessible Simple Minimal detail Streamlined and anticipatory Inviting, friendly Supportive but not fawning © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 25 Message architecture Cheeky • Witty and fun • Young without being childish Customer oriented and responsive • Approachable, friendly • Championing and empowering Helpful • Accessible © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 26 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 27 From: Little MOO | Print Robot <noreply@moo.com> Subject: MOO | Order 0629312615 | Confirmed Hello I'm Little MOO - the bit of software that will be managing your order with moo.com. It will shortly be sent to Big MOO, our print machine who will print it for you in the next few days. I'll let you know when it's done and on its way to you. Remember, I'm just a bit of software. So, if you have any questions regarding your order please first read our Frequently Asked Questions or contact customer services (who are real people!) Thanks, Little MOO, Print Robot © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 28 Message architecture… Cheeky Customer oriented and responsive Helpful © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 29 Versus brand values? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 30 Versus a mission or vision? “Great design for everyone” Vision and direction are different. This inspires, but isn’t tactical. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 31 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 32 Message architecture? Gracious • Welcoming, anticipatory service Elite and premium • Selective membership • “Curated” experiences Traditional • Enduring heritage • Preserving appreciation for quality © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 33 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 34 First things first. What do you need to communicate? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 35 First things first. start blogging, audit the content, consolidate site architecture, add video testimonials, incorporate reviews, relaunch the site, develop new brand guidelines, switch to a new CMS, or go “mobile first”… © 2013
    • If you don’t know what you need to communicate, how will you know if you succeed?
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 37 What’s a message architecture? A hierarchy of communication goals that reflects a common vocabulary. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 38 A little thing with big impact. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 39 A little thing with big impact. How could we prove this is a car not like anything else out there? It’s a small car, but it’s premium. You get a Porsche 911 ride for a fifth of the cost. It’s got history… but in Europe. You need to give people content to give them history.” © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 40 A little thing with big impact. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 41 Message architecture Premium technology • Assertive; ready to perform as a driver’s car • Proactive and supportive of spontaneity Classic design • Experienced and savvy Cheekiness • Smart, “punny,” hip • Fun, gleeful © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 42 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 43 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 44 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 45 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 46 If these emails are boring you and you don’t mind missing out on all the lip-smackin’ stuff we’ll be sending in the future, simply send a message to ownerunsubscribe@insiders.miniusa.com and include “Unsubscribe” and your favorite fruit in the subject field. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 47 Message architecture drives the user experience © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 48 …in content © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 49 …and in design © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 50 …and in the choice of features and content types © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 51 What’s a message architecture? A hierarchy of communication goals that reflects a common vocabulary. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 52 What’s a message architecture? Concrete, shared terminology, not abstract concepts. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 53 Welcoming, but elite. Selective? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 54 Traditional, but edgy. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 55 ©Warby Parker © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 56 Words are valuable, but meaningless without context and priority. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 57 Words are valuable, but meaningless without context and priority. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 58 © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 59 How? • • • • • • Engage in a tangible, hands-on way Encourage debate and conversation Identify points of disagreement Prevent seagulling Force prioritization Encourage ownership & investment © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 60 Why do this? Words are cheaper than comps. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 61 Why do this? Refine the concept, rather than confirm the purpose. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 62 Why do this? Promote new content types to manifest the message architecture—not just because they’re trendy or feasible. © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 63 Why do this? Gain standards by which to conduct a qualitative audit. (What is “good” anyway?) © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 64 © Lucas Films © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 65 What will you learn? • • • • • • What do we have? What are the patterns, elements, & types? Is it any good? What do we need to update? What do we need to translate? Where do we need more? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 66 Where can you go? • Apply a rubric to existing content, separate from politics and history • Prescribe new content—and reallocate budget and resources—to address specific communication goals • Promote a new editorial calendar • Consider CMS modifications to support new content types © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 67 Steps along the way… Message architecture Content audit/inventory Prescriptive content matrix Content model Editorial style guidelines Metadata guidelines Governance guidelines © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 68 Steps along the way… Message architecture Content audit/inventory Prescriptive content matrix Content model Gap analysis Editorial style guidelines Metadata guidelines Governance guidelines © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 69 Steps along the way… Message architecture Content audit/inventory Prescriptive content matrix Content model Gap analysis Editorial style guidelines How Metadata guidelines Governance guidelines © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 70 Steps along the way… Message architecture Content audit/inventory Prescriptive content matrix Content model Gap analysis Editorial style guidelines How Metadata guidelines Governance guidelinesBy whom & when © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 71 But first things first: What are you trying to communicate? What content do you have and what do you need to do that? © 2013
    • @mbloomstein | #HIDC 72 Thank you! Margot Bloomstein @mbloomstein margot@appropriateinc.com slideshare.net/mbloomstein amzn.to/CSatWork All photography © Margot Bloomstein unless otherwise noted. Screen grabs property of their respective owners at time of capture. © 2013