CECW-EH-D                  Department of the Army             EM 1110-2-1614                     U.S. Army Corps of Engine...
EM 1110-2-1614                                  30 June 1995US Army Corpsof EngineersENGINEERING AND DESIGNDesign of Coast...
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY                               EM 1110-2-1614                                  U.S. Army Corps of En...
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY                                                       EM 1110-2-1614                               ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Subject                                                    Paragraph     Page   Subject          Pa...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Figure                                                              Page   Figure                  ...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95controlled by regulatory works operated jointly by Cana-                                          ...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Table 2-1Relationships among Tp, Ts, and TzTz /Tp                       Ts /Tp               Commen...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                    30 Jun 9...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95              2           g Tp                                              Rmax in Equation 2-6 by...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95For other configurations of seawalls, Ward and Ahrens                 θ = is structure slope (from ...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 952-17. Layer Thickness                                               (2) The upper limit of the W100...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95                    γr H 3                                    by the moment of its own weight suppo...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                            ...
EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Figure 2-5. Seawall and bulkhead toe protectionwhere the stone diameter d can be related to the sto...
EM 1110-2-1614                                                                                                           3...
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads
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Em 1110-2-1614 design of coastal revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads

  1. 1. CECW-EH-D Department of the Army EM 1110-2-1614 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Washington, DC 20314-1000 30 June 1995 Manual1110-2-1614 Engineering and Design DESIGN OF COASTAL REVETMENTS, SEAWALLS, AND BULKHEADS Distribution Restriction Statement Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
  2. 2. EM 1110-2-1614 30 June 1995US Army Corpsof EngineersENGINEERING AND DESIGNDesign of Coastal Revetments,Seawalls, and BulkheadsENGINEER MANUAL
  3. 3. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-2-1614 U.S. Army Corps of EngineersCECW-EH-D Washington, DC 20314-1000ManualNo. 1110-2-1614 30 June 1995 Engineering and Design DESIGN OF COASTAL REVETMENTS, SEAWALLS, AND BULKHEADS1. Purpose. This manual provides guidance for the design of coastal revetment, seawalls, andbulkheads.2. Applicability. This manual applies to HQUSACE elements, major subordinate commands (MSC),districts, laboratories, and field operating activities (FOA) having civil works responsibilities.3. Discussion. In areas subject to wind-driven waves and surge, structures such as revetments,seawalls, and bulkheads are commonly employed either to combat erosion or to maintain developmentat an advanced position from the natural shoreline. Proper performance of such structures is pre-dicated on close adherence to established design guidance. This manual presents important designconsiderations and describes commonly available materials and structural components. All applicabledesign guidance must be applied to avoid poor performance or failure. Study of all available structuralmaterials can lead, under some conditions, to innovative designs at significant cost savings for civilworks projects.FOR THE COMMANDER:This manual supersedes EM 1110-2-1614, dated 30 April 1985.
  4. 4. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-2-1614 U.S. Army Corps of EngineersCECW-EH-D Washington, DC 20314-1000ManualNo. 1110-2-1614 30 June 1995 Engineering and Design DESIGN OF COASTAL REVETMENTS, SEAWALLS, AND BULKHEADS Table of ContentsSubject Paragraph Page Subject Paragraph PageChapter 1 Freeze-Thaw Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 2-17Introduction Marine Borer Activity . . . . . . . . . . 2-24 2-18Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1-1 Ultraviolet Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 2-18Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1-1 Abrasion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26 2-18References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1-1 Vandalism and Theft . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27 2-18Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 1-1 Geotechnical Considerations . . . . . . 2-28 2-18Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 1-1 Wave Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29 2-18 Impact Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30 2-20Chapter 2 Ice Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 2-20Functional Design Hydraulic Model Tests . . . . . . . . . . 2-32 2-20Shoreline Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2-1 Two-Dimensional Models . . . . . . . . 2-33 2-20Shoreline Form and Three-Dimensional Models . . . . . . . 2-34 2-20 Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 2-1 Previous Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35 2-21Seasonal Variations of Shoreline Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 2-1 Chapter 3Design Conditions Revetments for Protective Measures . . . . . . . . . 2-4 2-1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3-1Design Water Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 2-1 Armor Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 3-1Design Wave Estimation . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 2-2 Design Procedure Checklist . . . . . . . 3-3 3-1Wave Height and Period Variability and Significant Waves . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 2-2 Chapter 4Wave Gauges and Seawalls Visual Observations . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 2-3 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4-1Wave Hindcasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 2-4 Concrete Seawalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4-1Wave Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 2-4 Rubble-Mound Seawalls . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4-1Breaking Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 2-4 Design Procedure Checklist . . . . . . . 4-4 4-1Height of Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 2-4Wave Runup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 2-4 Chapter 5Wave Overtopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 2-6 BulkheadsStability and Flexibility . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 2-8 General 5-1 5-1Armor Unit Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 2-8 Structural Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 5-1Layer Thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17 2-10 Design Procedure Checklist . . . . . . . 5-3 5-1Reserve Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 2-10Toe Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 2-11 Chapter 6Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20 2-12 Environmental ImpactsFlank Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 2-16 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6-1Corrosion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22 2-16 Physical Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 6-1 i
  5. 5. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Subject Paragraph Page Subject Paragraph PageWater Quality Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 6-1 Appendix CBiological Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 6-1 SeawallsShort-term Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 6-2Long-term Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 6-2 Appendix DSocioeconomic and Bulkheads Cultural Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 6-2Evaluation of Alternatives . . . . . . . . . 6-8 6-2 Appendix E Sample ProblemAppendix AReferences Appendix F GlossaryAppendix BRevetmentsii
  6. 6. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95 List of FiguresFigure Page Figure Page2-1 Monthly lake level forecast . . . . . . . . . 2-3 B-16 Gobi block revetment2-2 Design breaker height . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-102-3 Surf parameter and B-17 Turf block revetment, breaking wave types . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Port Wing, WI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-112-4 Revetment toe protection . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 B-18 Turf block revetment2-5 Seawall and bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-11 toe protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 B-19 Nami Ring revetment,2-6 Toe aprons for sheet-pile bulkheads . . . . 2-15 Little Girls Point, MI . . . . . . . . . . . . B-122-7 Value of Ns, toe protection B-20 Nami Ring revetment cross section . . . . B-12 design for vertical walls . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 B-21 Concrete construction block2-8 Use of filter cloth under revetment revetment, Fontainebleau and toe protection stone . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 State Park, LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-132-9 Breaking wave pressures B-22 Concrete construction block on a vertical wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 revetment cross section . . . . . . . . . . . B-132-10 Wave pressure from broken waves . . . . 2-20 B-23 Detail of erosion of3-1 Typical revetment section . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 concrete control blocks . . . . . . . . . . . B-143-2 Summary of revetment alternatives . . . . 3-2 B-24 Concrete control block revetment,4-1 Typical concrete seawall sections . . . . . 4-1 Port Wing, WI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-144-2 Summary of seawall alternatives . . . . . . 4-1 B-25 Concrete control block revetment5-1 Summary of bulkhead alternatives . . . . . 5-2 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15B-1 Quarrystone revetment at B-26 Shiplap block revetment, Tawas Point, Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Benedict, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15B-2 Quarrystone revetment cross section . . . B-1 B-27 Shiplap block revetmentB-3 Large stone overlay revetment cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-16 at Oahe Reservoir, SD . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 B-28 Lok-Gard block revetment, JensenB-4 Large stone overlay Beach Causeway, FL . . . . . . . . . . . . B-16 revetment cross section . . . . . . . . . . . B-3 B-29 Lok-Gard block revetmentB-5 Field stone revetment at cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-17 Kekaha Beach, Kauai, HI . . . . . . . . . . B-3 B-30 Terrafix block revetment,B-6 Field stone revetment cross section . . . . B-4 Two Mile, FL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-17B-7 Broken concrete revetment B-31 Terrafix block revetment at Shore Acres, TX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-18B-8 Broken concrete revetment B-32 Fabriform revetment, cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5 location unknown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-18B-9 Asphaltic concrete revetment B-33 Fabriform revetment cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-19B-10 Concrete tribars (armor unit) B-34 Bag revetment at test section at CERC, Oak Harbor, WA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-20 Fort Belvoir, VA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7 B-35 Bag revetment cross section . . . . . . . . B-20B-11 Concrete tribar revetment B-36 Gabion revetment, Oak Harbor, WA . . . B-22 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7 B-37 Gabion revetment cross section . . . . . . B-22B-12 Formed concrete revetment, B-38 Steel fuel barrel revetment, Pioneer Point, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Kotzebue, AK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-23B-13 Formed concrete revetment B-39 Steel fuel barrel revetment cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 plan and cross section . . . . . . . . . . . B-23B-14 Concrete revetment blocks . . . . . . . . . . B-9 B-40 Fabric revetments, FontainebleauB-15 Gobi block revetment, State Park, LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-25 Holly Beach, LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10 B-41 Fabric revetment cross section . . . . . . . B-25 iii
  7. 7. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Figure Page Figure PageB-42 Concrete slab revetment, D-10 Railroad ties and steel Alameda, CA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-26 H-pile bulkhead, Port Wing, WI . . . . D-7B-43 Concrete slab revetment D-11 Railroad ties and steel cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-26 H-pile bulkhead cross section . . . . . . D-7B-44 Soil cement revetment, D-12 Treated timber bulkhead, Bonny Dam, CO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-27 Oak Harbor, WA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8B-45 Soil cement revetment cross section . . . B-27 D-13 Treated timber bulkheadB-46 Tire mattress revetment, cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8 Fontainebleau State Park, LA . . . . . . . B-28 D-14 Untreated log bulkhead,B-47 Tire mattress revetment Oak Harbor, WA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28 D-15 Untreated log bulkheadB-48 Landing mat revetment . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9B-49 Windrow revetment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-29 D-16 Hogwire fence and sandbagB-50 Protective vegetative plantings . . . . . . . B-30 bulkhead, Basin BayouC-1 Curved-face seawall Galveston, TX . . . . C-1 Recreation Area, FL . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10C-2 Curved-face seawall cross section . . . . . C-1 D-17 Hogwire fence and sandbagC-3 Stepped-face seawall, bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . D-10 Harrison County, MS . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2 D-18 Used rubber tire and timber postC-4 Stepped-face seawall cross section . . . . . C-2 bulkhead, Oak Harbor, WA . . . . . . . . D-11C-5 Combination stepped- and curved-face D-19 Used rubber tire and timber post seawall, San Francisco, CA . . . . . . . . C-3 bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . D-11C-6 Combination stepped- and D-20 Timber crib bulkhead curved-face seawall cross section . . . . C-3 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-12C-7 Rubble-mound seawall, D-21 Stacked rubber tire Fernandina Beach, FL . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4 bulkhead, Port Wing, WI . . . . . . . . . D-12C-8 Rubble-mound seawall D-22 Stacked rubber tire bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13D-1 Sheet-pile bulkhead, D-23 Used concrete pipe bulkhead, Lincoln Township, MI . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2 Beach City, TX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13D-2 Steel sheet-pile bulkhead D-24 Used concrete pipe bulkhead cross-section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-14D-3 Timber sheet-pile bulkhead, D-25 Longard tube bulkhead, possibly at Fort Story, VA . . . . . . . . . D-3 Ashland, WI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15D-4 Construction details of D-26 Longard tube bulkhead timber sheet pile bulkhead . . . . . . . . . D-3 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15D-5 Aluminum sheet-pile bulkhead D-27 Stacked bag bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4 cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-16D-6 Concrete sheet-pile bulkhead, D-28 Gabion bulkhead, possibly in Folly Beach, SC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4 Sand Point, MI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-16D-7 Cellular steel sheet-pile bulkhead, D-29 Gabion bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . D-16 plan and cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . D-5 E-1 Site conditions for sample problem . . . . E-1D-8 Concrete slab and E-2 Revetment section alternatives . . . . . . . E-6 king-pile bulkhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-5 E-3 Bulkhead section alternatives . . . . . . . . E-8D-9 Concrete slab and king-pile bulkhead cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6iv
  8. 8. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95 List of TablesTable Page Table Page2-1 Relationships Among Tp, Ts, and Tz . . . . 2-4 E-4 Site Preparation Costs for2-2 Rough Slope Runup Revetment Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . E-9 Correction Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 E-5 Material Costs for Armor2-3 Suggested Values for Use in Stone Revetment Alternative . . . . . . . E-9 Determining Armor Weight E-6 Material Costs for Concrete (Breaking Wave Conditions) . . . . . . . 2-9 Block Revetment Alternative . . . . . . . E-102-4 Layer Coefficients and Porosity E-7 Material Costs for Gabion for Various Armor Units . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Revetment Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-102-5 H/HD=0 for Cover Layer Damage E-8 Material Costs for Soil- Levels for Various Armor Types . . . . . 2-11 Cement Revetment Option . . . . . . . . E-102-6 Galvanic Series in Seawater . . . . . . . . . 2-17 E-9 Summary of Initial Costs6-1 Environmental Design Considerations for the Revetment Options . . . . . . . . E-10 for Revetments, Seawalls, E-10 Material Costs for Steel and Bulkheads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Sheetpile Bulkhead Option . . . . . . . . E-11B-1 Shiplap Block Weights . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15 E-11 Material Costs for Railroad TiesE-1 Predicted Runup and Required and Steel H-Pile Bulkhead Option . . . E-11 Crest Elevations for Sample E-12 Material Costs for Gabion Revetments Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5 Bulkhead Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-12E-2 Estimated Toe Scour Depths for E-13 Summary of Initial Costs for Sample Revetment Options . . . . . . . . E-5 the Bulkhead Options . . . . . . . . . . . . E-12E-3 Summary of Revetment E-14 Summary of Annual Costs for Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7 Revetment and Bulkhead Options . . . E-12 v
  9. 9. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Chapter 1 b. Bulkheads and seawalls. The terms bulkheadIntroduction and seawall are often used interchangeably. However, a bulkhead is primarily intended to retain or prevent sliding of the land, while protecting the upland area against wave1-1. Purpose action is of secondary importance. Seawalls, on the other hand, are more massive structures whose primary purposeThis manual provides guidance for the design of coastal is interception of waves. Bulkheads may be either can-revetments, seawalls, and bulkheads. tilevered or anchored (like sheetpiling) or gravity struc- tures (such as rock-filled timber cribs). Their use is1-2. Applicability limited to those areas where wave action can be resisted by such materials. In areas of intense wave action, mas-This manual applies to HQUSACE elements, major sive concrete seawalls are generally required. These maysubordinate commands, districts, laboratories, and field have either vertical, concave, or stepped seaward faces.operating activities having civil works responsibilities. c. Disadvantages. Revetments, bulkheads, and1-3. References seawalls mainly protect only the upland area behind them. All share the disadvantage of being potential wave reflec-Required and related publications are listed in Appen- tors that can erode a beach fronting the structure. Thisdix A. Bibliographic items are cited in the text by author problem is most prevalent for vertical structures that areand year of publication, with full references listed in nearly perfect wave reflectors and is progressively lessAppendix A. If any reference item contains information prevalent for curved, stepped, and rough inclined struc-conflicting with this manual, provisions of this manual tures that absorb or dissipate increasing amounts of wavegovern. energy.1-4. Background 1-5. DiscussionStructures are often needed along either bluff or beach The designer is responsible for developing a suitable solu-shorelines to provide protection from wave action or to tion which is economical and achieves the project’sretain in situ soil or fill. Vertical structures are classified purpose (see EM 1110-2-3300). Caution should be exer-as either seawalls or bulkheads, according to their func- cised, however, when using this manual for anythingtion, while protective materials laid on slopes are called beyond preliminary design in which the primary goal isrevetments. cost estimating and screening of alternatives. Final design of large projects usually requires verification by hydraulic a. Revetments. Revetments are generally constructed model studies. The construction costs of large projectsof durable stone or other materials that will provide suf- offer considerable opportunities for refinements and pos-ficient armoring for protected slopes. They consist of an sible cost savings as a result of model studies. Modelarmor layer, filter layer(s), and toe protection. The armor studies should be conducted for all but small projectslayer may be a random mass of stone or concrete rubble where limited budgets control and the consequences ofor a well-ordered array of structural elements that inter- failure are not serious.lock to form a geometric pattern. The filter assures drain-age and retention of the underlying soil. Toe protection isneeded to provide stability against undermining at thebottom of the structure. 1-1
  10. 10. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Chapter 2 2-4. Design Conditions for Protective MeasuresFunctional Design Structures must withstand the greatest conditions for which damage prevention is claimed in the project plan. All elements must perform satisfactorily (no damage2-1. Shoreline Use exceeding ordinary maintenance) up to this condition, or it must be shown that an appropriate allowance has beenSome structures are better suited than others for particular made for deterioration (damage prevention adjusted accor-shoreline uses. Revetments of randomly placed stone dingly and rehabilitation costs amortized if indicated). Asmay hinder access to a beach, while smooth revetments a minimum, the design must successfully withstand con-built with concrete blocks generally present little difficulty ditions which have a 50 percent probability of beingfor walkers. Seawalls and bulkheads can also create an exceeded during the project’s economic life. In addition,access problem that may require the building of stairs. failure of the project during probable maximum conditionsBulkheads are required, however, where some depth of should not result in a catastrophe (i.e., loss of life or inor-water is needed directly at the shore, such as for use by dinate loss of money).boaters. 2-5. Design Water Levels2-2. Shoreline Form and Composition The maximum water level is needed to estimate the maxi- a. Bluff shorelines. Bluff shorelines that are com- mum breaking wave height at the structure, the amount ofposed of cohesive or granular materials may fail because runup to be expected, and the required crest elevation ofof scour at the toe or because of slope instabilities aggra- the structure. Minimum expected water levels play anvated by poor drainage conditions, infiltration, and important role in anticipating the amount of toe scour thatreduction of effective stresses due to seepage forces. may occur and the depth to which the armor layer shouldCantilevered or anchored bulkheads can protect against extend.toe scour and, being embedded, can be used under someconditions to prevent sliding along subsurface critical a. Astronomical tides. Changes in water level arefailure planes. The most obvious limiting factor is the caused by astronomical tides with an additional possibleheight of the bluff, which determines the magnitude of the component due to meteorological factors (wind setup andearth pressures that must be resisted, and, to some extent, pressure effects). Predicted tide levels are publishedthe depth of the critical failure surface. Care must be annually by the National Oceanic and Atmospherictaken in design to ascertain the relative importance of toe Administration (NOAA). The statistical characteristics ofscour and other factors leading to slope instability. Grav- astronomical tides at various U.S. ports were analyzed inity bulkheads and seawalls can provide toe protection for Harris (1981) with probability density functions of waterbluffs but have limited applicability where other slope sta- levels summarized in a series of graphs and tables. Simi-bility problems are present. Exceptions occur in cases lar tables are available for the Atlantic Coast in Ebersolewhere full height retention is provided for low bluffs and (1982) which also includes estimates of storm surgewhere the retained soil behind a bulkhead at the toe of a values.higher bluff can provide sufficient weight to help counter-balance the active thrust of the bluff materials. b. Storm surge. Storm surge can be estimated by statistical analysis of historical records, by methods b. Beach shorelines. Revetments, seawalls, and described in Chapter 3 of the Shore Protection Manualbulkheads can all be used to protect backshore develop- (SPM), or through the use of numerical models. Thements along beach shorelines. As described in paragraph numerical models are usually justified only for large proj-1-4c, an important consideration is whether wave reflec- ects. Some models can be applied to open coast studies,tions may erode the fronting beach. while others can be used for bays and estuaries where the effects of inundation must be considered.2-3. Seasonal Variations of Shoreline Profiles c. Lake levels. Water levels on the Great LakesBeach recession in winter and growth in summer can be are subject to both periodic and nonperiodic changes.estimated by periodic site inspections and by computed Records dating from 1836 reveal seasonal and annualvariations in seasonal beach profiles. The extent of win- changes due to variations in precipitation. Lake levelster beach profile lowering will be a contributing factor in (particularly Ontario and Superior) are also partiallydetermining the type and extent of needed toe protection. 2-1
  11. 11. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95controlled by regulatory works operated jointly by Cana-  dian and U.S. authorities. These tend to minimize water Hs   d  C1  (2-3) exp C0  level variations in those lakes. Six-month forecasts of Hmo   gT 2  lake levels are published monthly by the Detroit District   p  (Figure 2-1). where2-6. Design Wave Estimation C0, C1 = regression coefficients given as 0.00089 andWave heights and periods should be chosen to produce 0.834, respectivelythe most critical combination of forces on a structure withdue consideration of the economic life, structural integrity, d = water depth at point in question (i.e., toe ofand hazard for events that may exceed the design con- structure)ditions (see paragraph 2-4). Wave characteristics may bebased on an analysis of wave gauge records, visual obser- g = acceleration of gravityvations of wave action, published wave hindcasts, waveforecasts, or the maximum breaking wave at the site. Tp = period of peak energy density of the waveWave characteristics derived from such methods may be spectrumfor deepwater locations and must be transformed to thestructure site using refraction and diffraction techniques as A conservative value of Hs may be obtained by usingdescribed in the SPM. Wave analyses may have to be 0.00136 for C0, which gives a reasonable upper envelopeperformed for extreme high and low design water levels for the data in Hughes and Borgman. Equation 2-3and for one or more intermediate levels to determine the should not be used forcritical design conditions.2-7. Wave Height and Period Variability and d < 0.0005 (2-4) 2Significant Waves g Tp a. Wave height. or where there is substantial wave breaking. (1) A given wave train contains individual waves ofvarying height and period. The significant wave height, (3) In shallow water, Hs is estimated from deepwaterHs, is defined as the average height of the highest conditions using the irregular wave shoaling and breakingone-third of all the waves in a wave train. Other wave model of Goda (1975, 1985) which is available as part ofheights such as H10 and H1 can also be designated, where the Automated Coastal Engineering System (ACES) pack-H10 is the average of the highest 10 percent of all waves, age (Leenknecht et al. 1989). Goda (1985) recommendsand H1 is the average of the highest 1 percent of all for the design of rubble structures that if the depth is lesswaves. By assuming a Rayleigh distribution, it can be than one-half the deepwater significant wave height, thenstated that design should be based on the significant wave height at a depth equal to one-half the significant deepwater wave H10 ≈ 1.27 Hs (2-1) height. b. Wave period. Wave period for spectral waveand conditions is typically given as period of the peak energy density of the spectrum, Tp. However, it is not uncom- H1 ≈ 1.67 Hs (2-2) mon to find references and design formulae based on the average wave period (Tz) or the significant wave period (2) Available wave information is frequently given as (Ts , average period of the one-third highest waves).the energy-based height of the zeroth moment, Hmo. In Rough guidance on the relationship among these wavedeep water, Hs and Hmo are about equal; however, they periods is given in Table 2.1.may be significantly different in shallow water due toshoaling (Thompson and Vincent 1985). The following c. Stability considerations. The wave height to beequation may be used to equate Hs from energy-based used for stability considerations depends on whether thewave parameters (Hughes and Borgman 1987):2-2
  12. 12. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Figure 2-1. Monthly lake level forecaststructure is rigid, semirigid, or flexible. Rigid structures 2-8. Wave Gauges and Visual Observationsthat could fail catastrophically if overstressed may warrantdesign based on H1. Semirigid structures may warrant a Available wave data for use by designers is often sparsedesign wave between H1 and H10. Flexible structures are and limited to specific sites. In addition, existing gaugeusually designed for Hs or H10. Stability coefficients are data are sometimes analog records which have not beencoupled with these wave heights to develop various analyzed and that are difficult to process. Project fundingdegrees of damage, including no damage. 2-3
  13. 13. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Table 2-1Relationships among Tp, Ts, and TzTz /Tp Ts /Tp Comments γ 10.67 0.80 Severe surf zone conditions NA0.74 0.88 Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum2 1.00.80 0.93 Typical JONSWAP spectrum2 3.3 20.87 0.96 Swell from distant storms 10.01 Developed from data in Ahrens (1987).2 Developed from Goda (1987).and time constraints may prohibit the establishment of a 2-11. Breaking Wavesviable gauging program that would provide sufficientdigital data for reliable study. Visual observations from a. Wave heights derived from a hindcast should beshoreline points are convenient and inexpensive, but they checked against the maximum breaking wave that can behave questionable accuracy, are often skewed by the supported at the site given the available depth at theomission of extreme events, and are sometimes difficult to design still-water level and the nearshore bottom slope.extrapolate to other sites along the coast. A visual wave Figure 2-2 (Weggel 1972) gives the maximum breakerobservation program is described in Schneider (1981). height, Hb, as a function of the depth at the structure, ds ,Problems with shipboard observations are similar to shore nearshore bottom slope, m, and wave period, T. Designobservations. wave heights, therefore, will be the smaller of the maxi- mum breaker height or the hindcast wave height.2-9. Wave Hindcasts b. For the severe conditions commonly used forDesigners should use the simple hindcasting methods in design, Hmo may be limited by breaking wave conditions.ACES (Leenknecht et al. 1989) and hindcasts developed A reasonable upper bound for Hmo is given byby the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Sta-tion (WES) (Resio and Vincent 1976-1978; Corson et al.1981) for U.S. coastal waters using numerical models.   2πdThese later results are presented in a series of tables for Hmo 0.10 Lp tanh   L  (2-5) maxeach of the U.S. coasts. They give wave heights and  p periods as a function of season, direction of waveapproach, and return period; wave height as a function ofreturn period and seasons combined; and wave period as a where Lp is wavelength calculated using Tp and d.function of wave height and approach angle. Severalother models exist for either shallow or deep water. Spe- 2-12. Height of Protectioncific applications depend on available wind data as wellas bathymetry and topography. Engineers should stay When selecting the height of protection, one must consid-abreast of developments and choose the best method for a er the maximum water level, any anticipated structuregiven analysis. Contact the Coastal Engineering Research settlement, freeboard, and wave runup and overtopping.Center (CERC) at WES for guidance in special cases. 2-13. Wave Runup2-10. Wave Forecasts Runup is the vertical height above the still-water levelWave forecasts can be performed using the same method- (swl) to which the uprush from a wave will rise on aologies as those for the wave hindcasts. Normally, the structure. Note that it is not the distance measured alongCorps hindcasts waves for project design, and the Navy the inclined surface.forecasts waves to plan naval operations.2-4
  14. 14. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Figure 2-2. Design breaker height a. Rough slope runup. a, b = regression coefficients determined as 1.022 and 0.247, respectively (1) Maximum runup by irregular waves on riprap-covered revetments may be estimated by (Ahrens and ξ= surf parameter defined byHeimbaugh 1988) tan θ ξ Rmax aξ (2-6)  2 π Hmo 1/2 (2-7) Hmo 1 bξ    gT 2   p where where θ is the angle of the revetment slope with the hori- Rmax = maximum vertical height of the runup above zontal. Recalling that the deepwater wavelength may be the swl determined by 2-5
  15. 15. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95 2 g Tp Rmax in Equation 2-6 by the correction factor listed in Lo (2-8) Table 2-2, and divide by the correction factor for quarry- 2π stone. For example, to estimate Rmax for a stepped 1:1.5 slope with vertical risers, determine Rmax by Equation 2-6 and multiply by (correction factor for steppedthe surf parameter is seen to be the ratio of revetment slope/correction factor for quarrystone) (0.75/0.60) = 1.25.slope to square root of wave steepness. The surf param- Rmax for the stepped slope is seen to be 25 percent greatereter is useful in defining the type of breaking wave con- than for a riprap slope.ditions expected on the structure, as shown in Figure 2-3. b. Smooth slope runup. Runup values for smooth slopes may be found in design curves in the SPM. How- ever, the smooth slope runup curves in the SPM were based on monochromatic wave tests rather than more realistic irregular wave conditions. Using Hs for wave height with the design curves will yield runup estimates that may be exceeded by as much as 50 percent by waves in the wave train with heights greater than Hs. Maximum runup may be estimated by using Equation 2-6 and con- verting the estimate to smooth slope by dividing the result by the quarrystone rough slope correction factor in Table 2-2. c. Runup on walls. Runup determinations for ver- tical and curved-face walls should be made using the guidance given in the SPM. 2-14. Wave Overtopping a. It is generally preferable to design shore protec- tion structures to be high enough to preclude overtopping. In some cases, however, prohibitive costs or other con- siderations may dictate lower structures than ideally needed. In those cases it may be necessary to estimate the volume of water per unit time that may overtop the structure. b. Wave overtopping of riprap revetments may be estimated from the dimensionless equation (Ward 1992)Figure 2-3. Surf parameter and breaking wave types (2) A more conservative value for Rmax is obtained by Q′ C0 e C1 F′ e C2 m (2-9)using 1.286 for a in Equation 2-6. Maximum runupsdetermined using this more conservative value for a pro-vide a reasonable upper limit to the data from which the where Q′ is dimensionless overtopping defined asequation was developed. Q (3) Runup estimates for revetments covered with Q′ (2-10) 3 1/2materials other than riprap may be obtained with the g Hmorough slope correction factors in Table 2-2. Table 2-2was developed for earlier estimates of runup based onmonochromatic wave data and smooth slopes. To use the where Q is dimensional overtopping in consistent units,correction factors in Table 2-2 with the irregular wave such as cfs/ft. F′ in Equation 2-9 is dimensionless free-rough slope runup estimates of Equation 2-6, multiply board defined as2-6
  16. 16. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Table 2-2Rough Slope Runup Correction Factors (Carstea et al. 1975b) Relative Size Correction FactorArmor Type Slope (cot θ) H / Kra,b rQuarrystone 1.5 3 to 4 0.60Quarrystone 2.5 3 to 4 0.63Quarrystone 3.5 3 to 4 0.60Quarrystone 5 3 0.60Quarrystone 5 4 0.68Quarrystone 5 5 0.72Concrete Blocksc Any 6b 0.93Stepped slope with vertical risers 1.5 1 ≤ Ho’/K r d 0.75Stepped slope with vertical risers 2.0 1 ≤ Ho’/Krd 0.75Stepped slope with vertical risers 3.0 1 ≤ Ho’/K r d 0.70Stepped slope with rounded edges 3.0 1 ≤ Ho’/K r d 0.86Concrete Armor UnitsTetrapods random two layers 1.3 to 3.0 - 0.45Tetrapods uniform two layers 1.3 to 3.0 - 0.51Tribars random two layers 1.3 to 3.0 - 0.45Tribars uniform one layer 1.3 to 3.0 - 0.50a Kr is the characteristic height of the armor unit perpendicular to the slope. For quarrystone, it is the nominal diameter; for armor units,the height above the slope.b Use Ho’ for ds/Ho’ > 3; and the local wave height, Hs for ds/Ho’ ≤ 3.c Perforated surfaces of Gobi Blocks, Monoslaps, and concrete masonry units placed hollows up.d Kr is the riser height. F variety of fronting berms, revetments, and steps. Infor- F′ (2-11) mation on overtopping rates for a range of configurations 2 1/3 H Lo mo is available in Ward and Ahrens (1992). For bulkheads and simple vertical seawalls with no fronting revetmentwhere F is dimensional freeboard (vertical distance of and a small parapet at the crest, the overtopping rate maycrest above swl). The remaining terms in Equation 2-9 be calculated fromare m (cotangent of revetment slope) and the regressioncoefficients C0, C1, and C2 defined as    C0 exp C1 F′ C2   F (2-13) Q′   d  C0 0.4578   s  C1 29.45 (2-12) where Q′ is defined in Equation 2-10, F′ is defined in C2 0.8464 Equation 2-11, ds is depth at structure toe, and the regres- sion coefficients are defined by C0 0.338The coefficients listed above were determined for dimen- C1 7.385 (2-14)sionless freeboards in the range 0.25 < F′ < 0.43, andrevetment slopes of 1:2 and 1:3.5. C2 2.178 c. Overtopping rates for seawalls are complicated bythe numerous shapes found on the seawall face plus the 2-7
  17. 17. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95For other configurations of seawalls, Ward and Ahrens θ = is structure slope (from the horizontal)(1992) should be consulted, or physical model tests shouldbe performed. Stones within the cover layer can range from 0.75 to 1.25 W as long as 50 percent weigh at least W and the2-15. Stability and Flexibility gradation is uniform across the structure’s surface. Equa- tion 2-15 can be used for preliminary and final designStructures can be built by using large monolithic masses when H is less than 5 ft and there is no major overtop-that resist wave forces or by using aggregations of smaller ping of the structure. For larger wave heights, modelunits that are placed either in a random or in a tests are preferable to develop the optimum design.well-ordered array. Examples of these are large rein- Armor weights determined with Equation 2-15 for mono-forced concrete seawalls, quarrystone or riprap revet- chromatic waves should be verified during model testsments, and geometric concrete block revetments. The using spectral wave conditions.massive monoliths and interlocking blocks often exhibitsuperior initial strength but, lacking flexibility, may not b. Equation 2-15 is frequently presented as a stabi-accommodate small amounts of differential settlement or lity formula with Ns as a stability number. Rewritingtoe scour that may lead to premature failure. Randomly Equation 2-15 asplaced rock or concrete armor units, on the other hand,experience settlement and readjustment under wave attack, Hand, up to a point, have reserve strength over design Ns   1/3 γ  (2-16)conditions. They typically do not fail catastrophically if W  r 1minor damages are inflicted. The equations in this γ  γ   r  w chapter are suitable for preliminary design for majorstructures. However, final design will usually requireverification of stability and performance by hydraulic it is readily seen thatmodel studies. The design guidance herein may be usedfor final design for small structures where the conse- Ns KD cot θ 1/3 (2-17)quences of failure are minor. For those cases, projectfunds are usually too limited to permit model studies. By equating Equations 2-16 and 2-17, W is readily2-16. Armor Unit Stability obtained. c. For irregular wave conditions on revetments of a. The most widely used measure of armor unit dumped riprap, the recommended stability number isstability is that developed by Hudson (1961) which isgiven in Equation 2-15: Nsz 1.14 cot1/6 θ (2-18) γr H 3 W where Nsz is the zero-damage stability number, and the γ 3 (2-15) value 1.14 is obtained from Ahrens (1981b), which rec- KD  r γ 1  cot θ  ommended a value of 1.45 and using Hs with Equation 2-  w  16, then modified based on Broderick (1983), which found using H10 (10 percent wave height, or average ofwhere highest 10-percent of the waves) in Equation 2-16 pro- vided a better fit to the data. Assuming a Rayleigh wave W = required individual armor unit weight, lb (or W50 height distribution, H10 ≈ 1.27 Hs. Because Hs is more for graded riprap) readily available than H10, the stability number in Equa- tion 2-17 was adjusted (1.45/1.27 = 1.14) to allow Hs to γr = specific weight of the armor unit, lb/ft3 be used in the stability equation while providing the more conservative effect of using H10 for the design. H = monochromatic wave height d. Stability equations derived from an extensive KD= stability coefficient given in Table 2-3 series of laboratory tests in The Netherlands were pre- sented in van der Meer and Pilarczyk (1987) and van der γw = specific weight of water at the site (salt or fresh)2-8
  18. 18. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Table 2-3Suggested Values for Use In Determining Armor Weight (Breaking Wave Conditions)Armor Unit n1 Placement Slope (cot θ) KDQuarrystoneSmooth rounded 2 Random 1.5 to 3.0 1.2Smooth rounded >3 Random 1.5 to 3.0 1.6Rough angular 1 Random 1.5 to 3.0 Do Not UseRough angular 2 Random 1.5 to 3.0 2.0Rough angular >3 Random 1.5 to 3.0 2.2 2Rough angular 2 Special 1.5 to 3.0 7.0 to 20.0Graded riprap3 24 Random 2.0 to 6.0 2.2Concrete Armor UnitsTetrapod 2 Random 1.5 to 3.0 7.0Tripod 2 Random 1.5 to 3.0 9.0Tripod 1 Uniform 1.5 to 3.0 12.0Dolos 2 Random 2.0 to 3.05 15.061 n equals the number of equivalent spherical diameters corresponding to the median stone weight that would fit within the layer thickness.2 Special placement with long axes of stone placed perpendicular to the slope face. Model tests are described in Markle and David-son (1979).3 Graded riprap is not recommended where wave heights exceed 5 ft.4 By definition, graded riprap thickness is two times the diameter of the minimum W50 size.5 Stability of dolosse on slope steeper than 1 on 2 should be verified by model tests.6 No damage design (3 to 5 percent of units move). If no rocking of armor (less than 2 percent) is desired, reduce KD by approximately50 percent.Meer (1988a, 1988b). Two stability equations were pre- slopes of 1:2 or 1:3, or S = 3 for revetment slopes of 1:4sented. For plunging waves, to 1:6. The number of waves is difficult to estimate, but Equations 2-19 and 2-20 are valid for N = 1,000 to N =  S  0.2 0.5 7,000, so selecting 7,000 waves should provide a conser- Ns 6.2 P 0.18   ξz (2-19) vative estimate for stability. For structures other than    N riprap revetments, additional values of P and S are pre- sented in van der Meer (1988a, 1988b).and for surging or nonbreaking waves, e. Equations 2-19 and 2-20 were developed for  S  0.2 deepwater wave conditions and do not include a wave- Ns 1.0 P 0.13   cot θ ξz P (2-20) height truncation due to wave breaking. van der Meer    N therefore recommends a shallow water correction given aswhere 1.40 Hs Ns (shallow water) (2-21) H2 P = permeability coefficient Ns (deep water) S = damage level where H2 is the wave height exceeded by 2 percent of the N = number of waves waves. In deep water, H2 ≈ 1.40 Hs , and there is no correction in Equation 2-21.P varies from P = 0.1 for a riprap revetment over animpermeable slope to P = 0.6 for a mound of armor stonewith no core. For the start of damage S = 2 for revetment 2-9
  19. 19. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 952-17. Layer Thickness (2) The upper limit of the W100 stone, W100 max, should equal the maximum size that can be economically a. Armor units. As indicated in the SPM, the thick- obtained from the quarry but not exceed 4 times W50 min.ness of an armor layer can be determined byEquation 2-22: (3) The lower limit of the W100 stone, W100 min, should not be less than twice W50 min.   1/3 (4) The upper limit of the W50 stone, W50 max, should n k∆   W (2-22) r w  be about 1.5 times W50 min.  r (5) The lower limit of the W15 stone, W15 min, shouldwhere r is the layer thickness in feet, n is the number of be about 0.4 times W50 min.armor units that would fit within the layer thickness (typi-cally n=2), and k∆ is the layer coefficient given in (6) The upper limit of the W15 stone, W15 max, shouldTable 2-4. For estimating purposes, the number of armor be selected based on filter requirements specified in EMunits, Nr, for a given surface area in square feet, A, is 1110-2-1901. It should slightly exceed W50 min.    2 (7) The bulk volume of stone lighter than W15 min in a  P   wr  3 (2-23) gradation should not exceed the volume of voids in the Nr A n k∆ 1    100   W  revetment without this lighter stone. In many cases, how- ever, the actual quarry yield available will differ from thewhere P is the average porosity of the cover layer from gradation limits specified above. In those cases theTable 2-4. designer must exercise judgment as to the suitability of the supplied gradation. Primary consideration should be b. Graded riprap. The layer thickness for graded given to the W50 min size under those circumstances. Forriprap must be at least twice the nominal diameter of the instance, broader than recommended gradations may beW50 stone, where the nominal diameter is the cube root of suitable if the supplied W50 is somewhat heavier than thethe stone volume. In addition, rmin should be at least required W50 min. Segregation becomes a major problem,25 percent greater than the nominal diameter of the however, when the riprap is too broadly graded.largest stone and should always be greater than a mini-mum layer thickness of 1 ft (Ahrens 1975). Therefore, 2-18. Reserve Stability a. General. A well-known quality of randomly   W 1/3 placed rubble structures is the ability to adjust and resettle rmin 2.0  50 min  ; max   under wave conditions that cause minor damages. This    γr  (2-24) has been called reserve strength or reserve stability.  Structures built of regular or uniformly placed units such  W 1/3  as concrete blocks commonly have little or no reserve 1.25  100  ; 1 ft   γ   stability and may fail rapidly if submitted to greater than  r   design conditions.where rmin is the minimum layer thickness perpendicular b. Armor units. Values for the stability coefficient,to the slope. Greater layer thicknesses will tend to KD, given in paragraph 2-16 allow up to 5 percent dam-increase the reserve strength of the revetment against ages under design wave conditions. Table 2-5 containswaves greater than the design. Gradation (within broad values of wave heights producing increasing levels oflimits) appears to have little effect on stability provided damage. The wave heights are referenced to thethe W50 size is used to characterize the layer. The fol- zero-damage wave height (HD=0) as used in Equation 2-15.lowing are suggested guidelines for establishing gradation Exposure of armor sized for HD=0 to these larger wavelimits (from EM 1110-2-1601) (see also Ahrens 1981a): heights should produce damages in the range given. If the armor stone available at a site is lighter than the stone (1) The lower limit of W50 stone, W50 min, should be size calculated using the wave height at the site, the zero-selected based on stability requirements using damage wave height for the available stone can beEquation 2-15.2-10
  20. 20. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Table 2-4Layer Coefficients and Porosity for Various Armor UnitsArmor Unit n Placement K∆ P (%)Quarrystone (smooth) 2 Random 1.00 38Quarrystone (rough) 2 Random 1.00 37Quarrystone (rough) ≥3 Random 1.00 40 aGraded riprap 2 Random N/A 37Tetrapod 2 Random 1.04 50Tribar 2 Random 1.02 54Tribar 1 Uniform 1.13 47Dolos 2 Random 0.94 56a By definition, riprap thickness equals two cubic lengths of W50 or 1.25 W100.Table 2-5H/HD=0 for Cover Layer Damage Levels for Various Armor Types (H/HD=0 for Damage Level in Percent)Unit 0 ≤ %D < 5 5 ≤ %D < 10 10 ≤ %D < 15 15 ≤ %D < 20 20 ≤ %D ≤ 30Quarrystone (smooth) 1.00 1.08 1.14 1.20 1.29Quarrystone (angular) 1.00 1.08 1.19 1.27 1.37Tetrapods 1.00 1.09 1.17 1.24 1.32Tribars 1.00 1.11 1.25 1.36 1.50Dolos 1.00 1.10 1.14 1.17 1.20calculated, and a ratio with the site’s wave height can be structure which prevents waves from scouring and under-used to estimate the damage that can be expected with the cutting it. Factors that affect the severity of toe scouravailable stone. All values in the table are for randomly include wave breaking (when near the toe), wave runupplaced units, n=2, and minor overtopping. The values in and backwash, wave reflection, and grain-size distributionTable 2-5 are adapted from Table 7-8 of the SPM. The of the beach or bottom materials. The revetment toeSPM values are for breakwater design and nonbreaking often requires special consideration because it is subjectedwave conditions and include damage levels above to both hydraulic forces and the changing profiles of the30 percent. Due to differences in the form of damage to beach fronting the revetment. Toe stability is essentialbreakwaters and revetments, revetments may fail before because failure of the toe will generally lead to failuredamages reach 30 percent. The values should be used throughout the entire structure. Specific guidance for toewith caution for damage levels from breaking and non- design based on either prototype or model results has notbreaking waves. been developed. Some empirical suggested guidance is contained in Eckert (1983). c. Graded riprap. Information on riprap reservestability can be found in Ahrens (1981a). Reserve stabi- b. Revetments.lity appears to be primarily related to the layer thicknessalthough the median stone weight and structure slope are (1) Design procedure. Toe protection for revetmentsalso important. is generally governed by hydraulic criteria. Scour can be caused by waves, wave-induced currents, or tidal currents.2-19. Toe Protection For most revetments, waves and wave-induced currents will be most important. For submerged toe stone, weights a. General. Toe protection is supplemental can be predicted based on Equation 2-25:armoring of the beach or bottom surface in front of a 2-11
  21. 21. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95 γr H 3 by the moment of its own weight supported by the zone Wmin of bearing beneath the toe of the structure. Possible toe γ 3 (2-25) configurations are shown in Figure 2-5. N  r 1 3 γ s   w  (2) Seepage forces. The hydraulic gradients of seepage flows beneath vertical walls can significantlywhere Ns is the design stability number for rubble toe increase toe scour. Steep exit gradients reduce the netprotection in front of a vertical wall, as indicated in the effective weight of the soil, making sediment movementSPM (see Figure 2-7). For toe structures exposed to under waves and currents more likely. This seepage flowwave action, the designer must select either Equation 2-15 may originate from general groundwater conditions, waterwhich applies at or near the water surface or Equation 2- derived from wave overtopping of the structure, or from25 above. It should be recognized that Equation 2-25 precipitation. A quantitative treatment of these factors isyields a minimum weight and Equation 2-15 yields a presented in Richart and Schmertmann (1958).median weight. Stone selection should be based on theweight gradations developed from each of the stone (3) Toe apron width. The toe apron width willweights. The relative importance of these factors depends depend on geotechnical and hydraulic factors. The pas-on the location of the structure and its elevation with sive earth pressure zone must be protected for a sheet-pilerespect to low water. When the toe protection is for wall as shown in Figure 2-6. The minimum width, B,scour caused by tidal or riverine currents alone, the from a geotechnical perspective can be derived using thedesigner is referred to EM 1110-2-1601. Virtually no Rankine theory as described in Eckert (1983). In thesedata exist on currents acting on toe stone when they are a cases the toe apron should be wider than the product ofproduct of storm waves and tidal or riverine flow. It is the effective embedment depth and the coefficient ofassumed that the scour effects are partially additive. In passive earth pressure for the soil. Using hydraulic con-the case of a revetment toe, some conservatism is pro- siderations, the toe apron should be at least twice thevided by using the design stability number for toe protec- incident wave height for sheet-pile walls and equal to thetion in front of a vertical wall as suggested above. incident wave height for gravity walls. In addition, the apron should be at least 40 percent of the depth at the (2) Suggested toe configurations. Guidance contained structure, ds. Greatest width predicted by these geotech-in EM 1110-2-1601 which relates to toe design con- nical and hydraulic factors should be used for design. Infigurations for flood control channels is modified for all cases, undercutting and unraveling of the edge of thecoastal revetments and presented in Figure 2-4. This is apron must be minimized.offered solely to illustrate possible toe configurations.Other schemes known to be satisfactory by the designer (4) Toe stone weight. Toe stone weight can beare also acceptable. Designs I, II, IV, and V are for up to predicted based on Figure 2-7 (from Brebner andmoderate toe scour conditions and construction in the dry. Donnelly 1962)). A design wave between H1 and H10 isDesigns III and VI can be used to reduce excavation suggested. To apply the method assume a value of dt thewhen the stone in the toe trench is considered sacrificial distance from the still water level to the top of the toe. Ifand will be replaced after infrequent major events. A the resulting stone size and section geometry are notthickened toe similar to that in Design III can be used for appropriate, a different dt should be tried. Using theunderwater construction except that the toe stone is placed median stone weight determined by this method, theon the existing bottom rather than in an excavated trench. allowable gradation should be approximately 0.5 to 1.5 W. c. Seawalls and bulkheads. 2-20. Filters (1) General considerations. Design of toe pro-tection for seawalls and bulkheads must consider geotech- A filter is a transitional layer of gravel, small stone, ornical as well as hydraulic factors. Cantilevered, anchored, fabric placed between the underlying soil and the struc-or gravity walls each depend on the soil in the toe area ture. The filter prevents the migration of the fine soilfor their support. For cantilevered and anchored walls, particles through voids in the structure, distributes thethis passive earth pressure zone must be maintained for weight of the armor units to provide more uniform set-stability against overturning. Gravity walls resist sliding tlement, and permits relief of hydrostatic pressures withinthrough the frictional resistance developed between the the soils. For areas above the waterline, filters alsosoil and the base of the structure. Overturning is resisted2-12
  22. 22. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95Figure 2-4. Revetment toe protection (Designs I through VI)prevent surface water from causing erosion (gullies) where the left side of Equation 2-27 is intended to preventbeneath the riprap. In general form layers have the rela- piping through the filter and the right side of Equation 2-tion given in Equation 2-26: 27 provides for adequate permeability for structural bedding layers. This guidance also applies between suc- d15 upper cessive layers of multilayered structures. Such designs < 4 (2-26) are needed where a large disparity exists between the void d85 under size in the armor layer and the particle sizes in the under- lying layer.Specific design guidance for gravel and stone filters iscontained in EM 1110-2-1901 and EM 1110-2-2300 (see b. Riprap and armor stone underlayers.also Ahrens 1981a), and guidance for cloth filters is con- Underlayers for riprap revetments should be sized as intained in CW 02215. The requirements contained in these Equation 2-28,will be briefly summarized in the following paragraphs. a. Graded rock filters. The filter criteria can be d15 armor <4 (2-28)stated as: d85 filter d15 filter d15 filter < 4 to 5 < (2-27) d85 soil d15 soil 2-13
  23. 23. EM 1110-2-161430 Jun 95Figure 2-5. Seawall and bulkhead toe protectionwhere the stone diameter d can be related to the stone For armor and underlayers of uniform-sized quarrystone,weight W through Equation 2-22 by setting n equal to 1.0. the first underlayer should be at least 2 stone diametersThis is more restrictive than Equation 2-27 and provides thick, and the individual units should weigh aboutan additional margin against variations in void sizes that one-tenth the units in the armor layer. When concretemay occur as the armor layer shifts under wave action. armor units with KD > 12 are used, the underlayer shouldFor large riprap sizes, each underlayer should meet the be quarrystone weighing about one-fifth of the overlyingcondition specified in Equation 2-28, and the layer thick- armor units.nesses should be at least 3 median stone diameters.2-14
  24. 24. EM 1110-2-1614 30 Jun 95 c. Plastic filter fabric selection. Selection of filter cloth is based on the equivalent opening size (EOS), which is the number of the U.S. Standard Sieve having openings closest to the filter fabric openings. Material will first be retained on a sieve whose number is equal to the EOS. For granular soils with less than 50 percent fines (silts and clays) by weight (passing a No. 200 sieve), select the filter fabric by applying Equation 2-29:Figure 2-6. Toe aprons for sheet-pile bulkheadsFigure 2-7. Value of Ns, toe protection design for vertical walls (from Brebner and Donnelly 1962) 2-15

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