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Transcript

  • 1. {Memory} [By Jennifer Ma]
  • 2. Memory the persistence of learning over time through the storage and retrieval of information
  • 3. The mind’s storehouse, the reservoir of your accumulated learning. Capacity: 500 to 1000 Terabytes COMPUTER Encode Storage Retrieval
  • 4. FLASHBULB MEMORIES DO YOU REMEMBER WHERE YOU WERE? When Kennedy died? 1. Place 2. Ongoing activity 3. Informant 4. Own Affect 5. Aftermath 6. Other Affect When Princess Di died? On September 11? During the moon landing? Unique and highly emotional moments in your past Property
  • 5. Flashbulb memories are not perfect and can err considering “the fragility of human memory”
  • 6.  
  • 7. “ ” Computer analogy: “First it translates (input) keystrokes) into an electronic language, much as the brain encodes sensory information into a neural language.”
  • 8. Mnemonics:Roy G.Biv Chunking: organizing objects into meaningful wholes. 6799570321 or 679-957-0321
  • 9. Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory The End