Copyright LiFE Academy 2010-2014
CLASS 1
Introduction
Historical Emergence
of the Archetypes
Ideal, Mundane,
Developed,
Un...
Introduction to the Archetypes
HAPPINESS AND HEALTH AND THE
ARCHETYPES
The word archetype means “original model” from the Greek
arche, (beginning) and ty...
 
 
IN OUR SELVES
We can see the archetypal behaviours
in our happiness goals, often connected to specific
activities, des...
Copyright LiFE Academy 2010-2011
We can observe archetypal behaviour in other people by the choice of
their priorities, by...
ARCHETYPAL DIAGNOSIS
Archetypal Diagnosis is like learning a language which enables the
therapist to understand the client...
LET US REFLECT
 WHAT DO YOU THINK?
Do you notice that your likes and dislikes change depending upon
what mood you are in? ...
 
Make a list of the moods you engage in that are the
most antagonistic to each other or the moods in which
goals are stri...
The 8 base archetypes we will be studying in this module are the
Mother and Father of the Parent Within
Feminine and Mascu...
OBSERVING ARCHETYPES THROUGH HISTORY
In early human society an
individual’s very existence was
reliant on the shelter that
could be extended to a child
through...
THE LEADERSHIP OF THE FATHER ARCHETYPE
 
This archetype is an extension of the birth ties
of the mother to a family group ...
THE DARING OF THE MASCULINE ARCHETYPE
In the animal kingdom the strongest is often the
only one allowed to be the lover. T...
THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE FEMININE
ARCHETYPE
This archetype appreciates and
recognises beauty and its
ability to attract a...
THE INGENUITY OF THE
ADAPTIVE THINKER ARCHETYPE
As with all archetypes, this archetype was of course
always present in som...
THE PROCESSING OF THE
ABSTRACT THINKER ARCHETYPE
The next archetype to rise was the Abstract Thinker with the more
philoso...
THE PROBLEM SOLVING OF THE
EXTERNAL MANAGER ARCHETYPE
They seek perfection through identifying
problems. They take on idea...
THE SELF DEVELOPMENT OF THE
INTERNAL MANAGER ARCHETYPE
When a person is past having to fight for
their very survival, and ...
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
Is there an era of history from your culture or another that
fascinates you, or that you used to be dra...
IDEAL, MUNDANE,
DEVELOPED, UNDEVELOPED,
AND
INAPPROPRIATE USE
IDEAL ARCHETYPAL EXPRESSION
In the case of the Ideal archetype,
happiness is generated from within their
own consciousness...
MUNDANE ARCHETYPAL EXPRESSION
The Mundane level of development seeks fulfilment by getting something
from the external wor...
DEVELOPED
An archetype can be
Developed and IDEAL
or
Developed and MUNDANE
UNDEVELOPED
There are many reasons why a person may not have developed an archetype,
such as:
1.There has been no pattern ...
INAPPROPRIATE USE
Inappropriate use of an archetype is usually due to the over-reliance
on one or a group of archetypes wi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Psyche of Self Class 1

71

Published on

Psyche of Self Class 1

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
71
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Psyche of Self Class 1

  1. 1. Copyright LiFE Academy 2010-2014 CLASS 1 Introduction Historical Emergence of the Archetypes Ideal, Mundane, Developed, Undeveloped, Inappropriate PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF
  2. 2. Introduction to the Archetypes
  3. 3. HAPPINESS AND HEALTH AND THE ARCHETYPES The word archetype means “original model” from the Greek arche, (beginning) and typos, (model). The word archetype has been used in modern psychology by Carl Jung because he was describing a grouping of character traits common to human experience that he believed resided in the collective unconscious of humanity.
  4. 4.     IN OUR SELVES We can see the archetypal behaviours in our happiness goals, often connected to specific activities, desires and concepts - and also connected to problems.
  5. 5. Copyright LiFE Academy 2010-2011 We can observe archetypal behaviour in other people by the choice of their priorities, by the happiness goals they select, the type of people they admire as well as the people they find hard to understand. IN OTHERS
  6. 6. ARCHETYPAL DIAGNOSIS Archetypal Diagnosis is like learning a language which enables the therapist to understand the client’s internal archetypal motivations. It also enables us to understand the self image, dialogues, conflicts and empty spaces between people in that most essential aspect of human life - relationships.
  7. 7. LET US REFLECT  WHAT DO YOU THINK? Do you notice that your likes and dislikes change depending upon what mood you are in? When you are feeling like some excitement and adventure is it easy to be satisfied sitting and reading a book, or having a long philosophical conversation?  
  8. 8.   Make a list of the moods you engage in that are the most antagonistic to each other or the moods in which goals are strikingly different. An example is deep introspection and spontaneous risk taking. You may have to think of all your happiness pursuits over the years to find them! Each endeavour is an individual or grouping of archetypal activities.   EXERCISE
  9. 9. The 8 base archetypes we will be studying in this module are the Mother and Father of the Parent Within Feminine and Masculine of the Lover Within Adaptive and Abstract Thinker of the Intellectual Within External Manager and Internal Manager or (Personal “I”) of the Manager Within   ARCHETYPES STUDIED IN THIS MODULE
  10. 10. OBSERVING ARCHETYPES THROUGH HISTORY
  11. 11. In early human society an individual’s very existence was reliant on the shelter that could be extended to a child through mothering and matriarchal ties. In some places of the world matrilineal succession and inheritance are still the law, a relic of the distant matriarchal times.   THE NURTURING OF THE MOTHER ARCHETYPE The one-on-one relationship development associated with this archetype enabled more complex life to evolve on the planet as one individual’s nurturing behaviour would be essential to the survival of another.
  12. 12. THE LEADERSHIP OF THE FATHER ARCHETYPE   This archetype is an extension of the birth ties of the mother to a family group or tribe. It is hard to know, in the many ancient societies spread over the planet, just when the fathers knew of their equally essential role in the fertility process. It was a time however where the importance of leadership and loyalty to leadership, rather than kinship alone, was more in focus. The next archetypal expression was based on the father, also seen in the animal kingdom.
  13. 13. THE DARING OF THE MASCULINE ARCHETYPE In the animal kingdom the strongest is often the only one allowed to be the lover. The others are the bachelors on the fringe of the group. In human societies after the time of the family we see the rise of the nomadic societies and well established agrarian societies going far afield to discover new worlds, conquer others and plunder their resources. Individuals and groups would go out to meet or make a challenge. Of course winning wars and therefore having domination became the currency of status.
  14. 14. THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE FEMININE ARCHETYPE This archetype appreciates and recognises beauty and its ability to attract attention and investments of energy for its pursuits. The ability to attract is a very important part of animal behaviour and is used almost exclusively for procreation. The Feminine Lover archetype created the fabric for society to work within, so that instead of resorting to open conflict, people used diplomacy and built comfortable spaces in which there would be a greater tendency to connect to others and form social relationships.  
  15. 15. THE INGENUITY OF THE ADAPTIVE THINKER ARCHETYPE As with all archetypes, this archetype was of course always present in some form. It is the intelligence that pulls things apart and puts them back together or changes an object to make something new and useful. It is an intelligence that is very helpful to the pursuits of the other archetypes; i.e. extend the Feminine Lover archetype’s love of beauty and the arts... ...the Masculine hunter’s weapons Historically this archetype came to ascendency with such things as making medicines, the smelting of metals and other inventions that enhanced individual and collective life.
  16. 16. THE PROCESSING OF THE ABSTRACT THINKER ARCHETYPE The next archetype to rise was the Abstract Thinker with the more philosophical pursuit of enjoying envisioning the future and pondering the meaning of life. This archetype is the home of conceptualisation and deep thinking, playing with ideas and internally visualising outcomes and possibilities which had value for both practical and ideological aspects of society.   Diotima of the Pythagorean School Confusious This enriched the pursuits of the other archetypes by enhancing fervour through ideologies and also through mental reasoning which developed sciences and theoretical calculations of cause and effect. Respected Aboriginal Elders and Law Keepers
  17. 17. THE PROBLEM SOLVING OF THE EXTERNAL MANAGER ARCHETYPE They seek perfection through identifying problems. They take on ideas that have value and relevance to the society of the day (courtesy of the Abstract Thinker archetype) and try to manifest them efficiently, using the minimum amount of energy for the maximum amount of product. The External Manager takes on concepts and materialise them in external structures, like these Aboriginal industrial sized fish traps over 40,000 years old at This is the pragmatic organiser, who looks for the problems and then fixes them now, not in the uncertain future.
  18. 18. THE SELF DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERNAL MANAGER ARCHETYPE When a person is past having to fight for their very survival, and after experiencing the many passing distractions of external gains and possessions, they look to their internal world. The big questions then become “who am I?” and “what will really make me deeply fulfilled?”    The Internal Manager or Personal “I” archetype is primarily interested in his or her own internal reflections and a need for overall personal satisfaction. In the 1950’s and 60’s there was rebellion against the regulated conformity that the External Manager had created. Questioning of dogmatic institutions and ideologies led to new life style choices. All the archetypal pursuits were enhanced and had something to gain from the wide ranging self development and encouragement of individual creativity.
  19. 19. WHAT DO YOU THINK? Is there an era of history from your culture or another that fascinates you, or that you used to be drawn to? Are you drawn to specific eras of artwork, movies or books? What are the happiness goals that you associate with that era, and which archetypes do you think are involved?  
  20. 20. IDEAL, MUNDANE, DEVELOPED, UNDEVELOPED, AND INAPPROPRIATE USE
  21. 21. IDEAL ARCHETYPAL EXPRESSION In the case of the Ideal archetype, happiness is generated from within their own consciousness and is not conditioned by the state of the external world. The Ideal level of development seeks fulfilment from being a certain way internally and being able to express that in life. It is not reliant on the external world conforming to its ideas and desires for happiness to be achieved. The Ideal does not try to bind people or control them for the fulfillment of their own desires, as the Mundane does. It is the purity of intent that identifies an Ideally developed archetype.
  22. 22. MUNDANE ARCHETYPAL EXPRESSION The Mundane level of development seeks fulfilment by getting something from the external world. The environment must conform to their desires (law of expectation, designer desires) and their own perceived welfare. External goals and desires are of primary importance to them. A person utilises a mundanely developed archetype as the vehicle to deliver to them fulfilment from the external world. Because of their perceived need, the Mundane developed archetype will bind people to them, by coercion if necessary. They unconsciously or consciously use the archetype as a mechanism to have control over others, thus ensuring the fulfillment of their desires and a supply of happiness.
  23. 23. DEVELOPED An archetype can be Developed and IDEAL or Developed and MUNDANE
  24. 24. UNDEVELOPED There are many reasons why a person may not have developed an archetype, such as: 1.There has been no pattern of that archetype’s development in the people who have been influential in the person’s childhood or adolescence 2. The archetype is shunned by the culture the individual is part of 3. The person has, at impressionable stages of their life, witnessed or experienced, the archetype being an avenue for painful experiences, being useless in the pursuit of happiness or a threat to the experience of happiness 4.The archetypal development has atrophied or completely shut-down due to the person being subject to trauma or disillusionment and lack of success when pursuing happiness goals through the concepts and feelings of that archetype.  
  25. 25. INAPPROPRIATE USE Inappropriate use of an archetype is usually due to the over-reliance on one or a group of archetypes with which a person has experienced some degree of success in the happiness stakes. Having a past successful experience leads the person to keep trying that same archetype in many or all situations in the hope of similar success.

×