Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
673
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Hands-on History: teaching archaeology to students - experiences from the classroom, from the museum, and from the field Building Bridges for Historical Learning 28-9 March 2011 Dr Craig Barker Sydney University Museums
  • 2. The Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney
  • 3. Nicholson Museum Education Room
  • 4. Nicholson Museum Galleries
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. Archaeological Excavations at Nea Paphos in Cyprus
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10. What Is Archaeology?
    • Archaeology , or archeology (from Greek ἀ ρχαιολογία, archaiologia ) is the study of past human societies, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data which they have left behind, which includes artefacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes.
    • Archaeology studies human history from the development of the first stone tools 2.5 million years ago up until recent decades.
  • 11. What Archaeology is Not!
    • Only practiced overseas, and
    • Only practiced on ancient cultures
    • Material culture can help us understand the Australian narrative too
  • 12. An understanding of archaeological processes and analysis can bring to students:
    • tangible learning experiences through “holding history” (hands-on experiences)
    • development of critical thinking through artefact analysis
    • development of multiple interpretations based on available evidence
    • a different and memorable experience (particularly if it is out of the classroom)
    • a fun and entertaining learning experience
  • 13. Two types of approaches to archaeological analysis that needs to be considered:
    • General archaeological methodology, theory and practices
    • (How, Where, Why, What, When)
    • Site/Culture/Artefact Specific Research (e.g. Pompeii, ancient ceramic production, The Rocks, etc.)
    • The level of investigative detail by the students can be varied according to age and complexity of the study, but an understanding of archaeological processes as well as historical processes gives students a more holistic understanding of past lives.
  • 14.  
  • 15. Integrating historical evidence with archaeological evidence
  • 16. WHAT RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO TEACHERS TO HELP YOU MAKE ARCHAEOLOGY ACCESSIBLE TO STUDENTS?
  • 17. 1. Participation on a Dig
    • Australian international excavation projects with volunteer programs (for adults) include:
    • University of Sydney excavations in
    • Paphos, Cyprus
    • Pella, Jordan
    • Central Asian Project (Uzbekistan)
    • Angkor, Cambodia
    • http://www.arts.usyd.edu.au/archaeology/research/projects.shtml
  • 18. Participation on a Dig
    • How to find out participatory excavations:
    • Archaeological Institute of America Fieldwork Opportunities: www.archaeological.org/webinfo.php?page=10016
    • Earthwatch: http://www.earthwatch.org/
  • 19.  
  • 20. 2. Visiting Heritage Sites or Excavations
    • Many Australian examples
    • The Big Dig, The Rocks
  • 21.
    • Port Arthur, Tasmania
  • 22.
    • Mungo National Park, New South Wales
  • 23. Visiting Heritage and Archaeological Sites
    • Overseas examples
    • Tour groups that
    • specialise in
    • school tours
  • 24. Academy Travel www.academytravel.com.au
  • 25.
    • University of Sydney’s Centre for Continuing Education Study Tours
    • Real Travel
    • www.realtravel.com.au
  • 26. 3. Visiting Museums
    • ANCIENT CULTURES
    • Nicholson Museum (University of Sydney)
    • Museum of Ancient Cultures (Macquarie University)
    • Ian Potter Museum of Art (University of Melbourne)
    • John Elliot Museum (University of Tasmania)
    • RD Milns Antiquities Museum
    • (University of Queensland)
    • Abbey Museum of Art & Archaeology
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29. Focus on tacit hands-on experiences
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.
    • Australian Historical Museums
    • Australian Museum
    • National Museum of Australian
    • Australian War Memorial
    • Historic Houses Trusts Properties
    • Hyde Park Barracks
    • Australian Maritime Museum
    • Mary MacKillop Place Museum
    • Powerhouse Museum
    • Sydney Jewish Museum
    • Macleay Museum (University of Sydney)
    • Etc.
  • 35. MUSEUMS ONLINE
    • British Museum (Explore)
  • 36. http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/explore_introduction.aspx
  • 37. 4. Archaeology in the Classroom
    • Activities you can do….
    • Your own
    • hands-on workshops
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41. Classroom Activities
    • Using historical photographs
  • 42. Classroom Activities
    • Your own dig or survey
  • 43. Classroom Activities
    • Archaeology is About Recording
    • Descriptive and visual skills for students
    • Work on your descriptive powers. Practice describing simple everyday objects around you, even: a telephone, a book, a DVD, a tree, a tin can, a coin. You don't have to describe what it's used for, necessarily, but what is the texture like, what is its over all shape, what colour is it. Use a thesaurus, just pack your descriptions with words.
    • Sharpen your visual skills. Buildings are perfect for this. Find an older building--doesn't have to be terribly old, 75 years or more would be fine. If it is old enough, the house you live in works perfectly. Look at it closely and try to see if you can tell what might have happened to it. Are there scars from old renovations? Can you tell if a room or a window sill was painted a different color once? Is there a crack in the wall? Is there a bricked-up window? Is there a stain on the ceiling? Is there a staircase that goes nowhere or a doorway that's permanently shut? Try to figure out what happened.
  • 44. HOW DO I STAY UP TO DATE WITH RELEVANT ARCHAEOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS AND NEW RESEARCH? http://www.earthwatch.org/
  • 45. Keeping Up To Date With Research: Archaeology Magazines Archaeology Bi-monthly publication of the Archaeological Institute of America Now in its fiftieth year
  • 46.
    • Biblical Archaeology Review
    • BAR covers the archaeology of the old and new
    • testaments in a nondenominational way; often
    • controversial, always entertaining
  • 47.
    • Current Archaeology
    • Britain's leading
    • archaeology magazine; and
    • a great source of
    • archaeology news for the
    • United Kingdom.
  • 48.
    • Minerva
    • Published in London six times a year,
    • Minerva covers primarily, but not exclusively,
    • old world archaeology with an emphasis on
    • ancient art history.
  • 49. www.pasthorizons.com Past Horizons – a free bi-monthly online magazine
  • 50.
    • Children’s magazines
    • Dig
    • Whacky but True
  • 51. TV Programs
    • Time Team
    • (Produced by Channel 4 in UK, screened on ABC in Australia)
  • 52. DVD - Astarte Resources http://www.astarte.com.au/
  • 53. Keeping Up To Date Online
    • E-Newsletters
    • AIA e-Update
    • Archaeology Daily News www.archaeologydaily.com
    • Ancient World News (ABC) www.abc.net.au/science/news/ancient
    • Explorator groups.yahoo.com/group/Explorator
    • Don’t Forget Social Networking Site - many excavation projects have Facebook and YouTube profiles
  • 54. Keeping Up To Date With Archaeological Research: Blogs
    • www.archaeologydigs.blogspot.com/
  • 55. Fieldwork Websites and Blogs http://www.archaeology.org/interactive/ Blogs from: Pompeii, Sagalassos, Black Sea, Arizona
  • 56.
    • www.paphostheatre.com
  • 57. www.paphostheatre.com
  • 58. Time Map: http://www.timemap.net/
  • 59. Podcasts
  • 60. National Archaeology Week
    • Held the third week of May each year
    • www. archaeologyweek .com/
    • Includes a list of tertiary institutions in
    • Australian that offer
    • archaeology and
    • archaeology-related courses.
  • 61. Joining Archaeological Societies
    • NEAF (Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation)
    • AAIA (Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens)
    • AIA (Archaeological Institute of America)
    • ASHA (Australian Society of Historical Archaeology)
    • AAA (Australian Archaeological Association)
    • Sydney University Ancient History Teachers Hub (ACAHA@Sydney)
    • www.arts.usyd.edu.au/sophi/community/for_teachers.shtml
  • 62. Make It Fun!
    • And have life-long learning…..
    [email_address]