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Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final
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Habitats d4.3.2 networking services and service toolkit final

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This deliverable presents the final status of the HABITATS Networking Services and service toolkits. Networking services are series of specific networking service applets deployed and tested for data …

This deliverable presents the final status of the HABITATS Networking Services and service toolkits. Networking services are series of specific networking service applets deployed and tested for data sharing within the project. This deliverable also presents the background of invoking services and their relevance to the HABITATS project and examines the basic networking architecture and specific tools that are considered. The focus of this final report is not only on the application of these aspects within the Reference Laboratory but also includes the invoking of services at the level of the different pilots. The rich prototype set as implemented on the HABITATS Reference Laboratory geoportal platform and its relationship to the pilot architecture are also described.

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  • 1. European Commission Information Society and Media DELIVERABLE Project Acronym: HABITATS Grant Agreement number: 3-250455 Project Title: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS D4.3.2 HABITATS networking services and service toolkitDocument identifier: D4.3.2Date: 07 March 2013Nature: PDissemination level: PuWP Lead Partner: HSRSRevision V1 Project co-funded by the European Commission within the ICT Policy Support Programme Dissemination Level PU Public X RE Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services) CO Confidential, only for members of the consortium (including the Commission Services) This project is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme as part of the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme by the European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/ict_psp This document reflects only the authors views and the European Community is not liable for any use that might be made of the information contained herein. © HABITATS Consortium, 2012
  • 2. European CommissionInformation Society and MediaAbstract: This deliverable presents the final status of the HABITATS Networking Servicesand service toolkits. Networking services are series of specific networking service appletsdeployed and tested for data sharing within the project. This deliverable also presents thebackground of invoking services and their relevance to the HABITATS project and examinesthe basic networking architecture and specific tools that are considered. The focus of thisfinal report is not only on the application of these aspects within the Reference Laboratorybut also includes the invoking of services at the level of the different pilots. The richprototype set as implemented on the HABITATS Reference Laboratory geoportal platformand its relationship to the pilot architecture are also described.Key Words: HABITATS, networking services, service toolkits, invoking prototype applet,data sharing, Reference Laboratory, social media, social networkingAuthors:Karel Charvat (HSRS)Jachym Cepicky (HSRS)Premysl Vohnout (HSRS)Stepan Kafka (HSRS)Michal Sredl (HSRS)Tomas Mildorf (HSRS)John J O’Flaherty (MAC)Joe Cantwell (MAC)Raitis Berzins (IMCS)Peteris Bruns (IMCS)G. .Osorio (Tragsa)Jan Bojko (FMI)A. Sciana (Madonia) Statement of originality: This deliverable contains original unpublished work except where clearly indicated otherwise. Acknowledgement of previously published material and of the work of others has been made through appropriate citation, quotation or both.This project is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme as part of the Competitiveness andInnovation Framework Programme by the European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/ict_pspThis document reflects only the authors views and the European Community is not liable for any use that mightbe made of the information contained herein. © HABITATS Consortium, 2012
  • 3. Revision HistoryRevision Date Author Organization DescriptionV1.0 08/10/2012 K. Charvat HSRS First draftV0.3 06/01/2013 K. Charvat HSRS Integration of contributionsV0.2 07/01/2013 J. O`Flaherty MAC Update of documentV0.1 01/03/2013 G. .Osorio Tragsa Update of documentV2 03/03/2012 K.Charvat HSRS Finalisation of documentDocument Change RecordIssue Date Author Item Reason for Change
  • 4. Project Officer: Krister Olson European Commission DG Information Society and Media Project Officer Address: DG INFSO – E06 Office: EUFO – 01/177 L – 2920 LUXEMBOURG Phone: +(352) 43 0134332 Fax: +(352) E-mail: Krister.olson@ec.europa.euProject Manager: Mariano Navarro de la Cruz Address: C/ Julian Camarillo, 6b, 28037, Madrid, Spain Phone: +34 91 322 65 21 Fax: +34 91 322 63 23 E-mail: mnc@tragsa.es
  • 5. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas TABLE OF CONTENTS1 FIGURES........................................................................................................................72 TABLES ........................................................................................................................103 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................... 11 Terms ................................................................................................................................ 11 Abbreviations ....................................................................................................................124 INSPIRE, NETWORKING ARCHITECTURE AND HABITATS.......................................145 INVOKING SERVICES .................................................................................................15 INVOKING service requirements and recommendations...................................................166 PROBLEMS OF POLICY DRIVEN SDI .........................................................................18 Neogeography ..................................................................................................................197 HABITATS NETWORKING SERVICES ........................................................................20 Reference Lab ..................................................................................................................20 Uniform Resource Management (URM) Concept ..............................................................23 Use of the URM in the HABITATS RL ........................................................................... 268 RL NETWORKING SERVICES AND INVOKING TOOLS..............................................28 Authorization and Authentication tools ..............................................................................30 Liferay based geoportal solution .......................................................................................31 Customisation of the portal content.................................................................................. 33 WordPress based GeoSocial Network ..............................................................................36 Uniform Resource Management (URM) ............................................................................39 MICKA ............................................................................................................................. 39 Geoserver.......................................................................................................................... 43 Data management ......................................................................................................... 43 Data visualisation ......................................................................................................... 44 Map compositions ........................................................................................................ 45 Data publication ........................................................................................................... 45 Styler............................................................................................................................. 46 Vector data editing ........................................................................................................ 47 Layer hierarchy and thematic maps.............................................................................. 49 Metadata Extractor ........................................................................................................... 51 Networking Services and Invoking ....................................................................................52 Catalogue Services ........................................................................................................... 52 Invoking of discovery services ..................................................................................... 55 Experiences with sharing of metadata in INSPIRE and GEOSS and Super Catalogue implementation ............................................................................................................. 56 Catalogues interoperabity problems ................................................................................................................. 56 Central catalogue implementation .................................................................................................................... 57 Testing Results ................................................................................................................................................. 61 Practical Results ............................................................................................................................................... 61 Plans for future ................................................................................................................................................. 63 View Services ...................................................................................................................63 Map ............................................................................................................................... 65 Layer Switcher ............................................................................................................. 66 Logical structure............................................................................................................................................... 6707 March 2013 1 of 44
  • 6. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas OWS ............................................................................................................................. 67 Printing with HSLayers ................................................................................................ 68 Web Map Context ........................................................................................................ 70 Permanent link .............................................................................................................. 73 Embedded ..................................................................................................................... 73 Querying displayed layers ............................................................................................ 74 User graphics and measuring ....................................................................................... 75 OGC Web Processing Service client ............................................................................ 76 Server-side scripts ........................................................................................................ 77 HSProxy ........................................................................................................................................................... 78 StatusManager server script ......................................................................................... 78 Proxy4OWS ..................................................................................................................................................... 78 Invoking with HSlayers ................................................................................................ 79 Invoking of view (WMS) services.................................................................................................................... 79 WMS coordinate transformation ...................................................................................................................... 80 Invoking of Map Compositions – Web Map Context ....................................................................................... 82 Invoking of WFS and WCS.............................................................................................................................. 83 Invocation ..................................................................................................................... 86 Filter Encoding Filtering WFS Layers ............................................................................................................. 86 FE Examples: ............................................................................................................... 86 Filter Encoding and WFS ................................................................................................................................. 87 WPS invoking .................................................................................................................................................. 92 HSLayers SOS client ........................................................................................................................................ 94 HSLayers Embed component ........................................................................................................................... 95 Mobile solutions for RL ................................................................................................... 97 Using KML as common format .................................................................................. 101 Field editing ................................................................................................................ 1029 PROCESSING WORKFLOW MANAGEMENT ........................................................... 104 Orchestration environment .............................................................................................. 104 Workflow Management System ....................................................................................... 104 Business Process Execution Language .......................................................................... 104 Engines and work-flow managers .................................................................................. 105 Apache ODE............................................................................................................... 105 Orchestra .................................................................................................................... 105 Taverna Server ............................................................................................................ 106 Workflow designers .................................................................................................... 107 52°North WPS Workflow Modeller and Orchestration API ...................................... 107 ECLIPSE BPEL ......................................................................................................... 108 HUMBOLDT Workflow Design and Construction Service....................................... 110 Taverna Workbench .....................................................................................................11110 HABITATS PILOTS’ NETWORK SERVICES............................................................... 113 PILOTS DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................................... 115 Wild Salmon Monitoring ................................................................................................ 115 La Palma Protected Marine Reserve .............................................................................. 119 MadoniE Hiking Trip Planner ........................................................................................ 122 Madonia Sheep and Goat Herding Management ........................................................... 123 Augmented Reality Natural Reserve .............................................................................. 125 Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats.................................................. 130 National Forest Programme............................................................................................ 13311 INTEROPERABILITY AND INVOCATION TESTS ...................................................... 13607 March 2013 2 of 44
  • 7. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Interoperability and Enabling Services ............................................................................ 136 3.2 HABITATS “Quick Prototyping” Service Applets .................................................... 137 The interoperability tests IMCS RL .................................................................................. 138 IRISH test with RL ......................................................................................................... 138 La Palma Reserve Marine Pilot test with RL ................................................................. 139 Augmented Reality Nature Reserve Pilot test with RL.................................................. 140 FMI Liberec region test of Reference Laboratory......................................................... 141 Experimentation with Open Linked Data ....................................................................... 14312 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................ 14513 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................... 147Figure 1 INSPIRE Networking Architecture............................................................................ 16Figure 2 Reverse “pyramid” effect (Bregt 2012). .................................................................... 18Figure 3 Spider Web Paradigm ................................................................................................. 19Figure 4 The changing sources of spatial data (Harris & Lafone). .......................................... 19Figure 5 Habitats Networking Architecture ............................................................................. 21Figure 6 Habitats RL and pilots................................................................................................ 21Figure 7 Habitats RL ................................................................................................................ 22Figure 8 URM concept ............................................................................................................. 24Figure 9 URM principles .......................................................................................................... 25Figure 10 URM Spidernet ........................................................................................................ 26Figure 11 Portal login ............................................................................................................... 30Figure 12 Portal registration ..................................................................................................... 31Figure 13 Liferay Interface....................................................................................................... 32Figure 14 Customisation of RL I .............................................................................................. 33Figure 15 Customisation of RL II ............................................................................................ 34Figure 16 Customisation of RL III ........................................................................................... 35Figure 17 Customisation of RL IV ........................................................................................... 36Figure 18 WordPress Based RL................................................................................................ 37Figure 19 WordPress Article Editing ........................................................................................ 38Figure 20 Micka Metadata Editing ........................................................................................... 40Figure 21 Micka Metadata Validation ...................................................................................... 40Figure 22 Micka Metadata importing ....................................................................................... 41Figure 23 Micka Metadata importing XML ............................................................................. 41Figure 24 Micka metadata importing WMC ............................................................................ 42Figure 25 Editing of Imported metadata .................................................................................. 42Figure 26 Validation result ....................................................................................................... 43Figure 27 Metadata records management ................................................................................ 43Figure 28 Slyling ...................................................................................................................... 47Figure 29 Editing of vector data ............................................................................................... 48Figure 30 Data flow between HS Layers and Geoserver. ........................................................ 49Figure 31 User (or administrator) can create thematic maps (map compositions) usingstandard OGC OWS client, part of the mapping application. .................................................. 50Figure 32 Ordering layers into groups, without touching the physical structure of displayedmaps.......................................................................................................................................... 50Figure 33 Changing the physical structure of displayed layers. In the "Physical view" tab,layers cannot be structured into groups, but their position in the layer tree (using drag&drop)can be changed. ........................................................................................................................ 51Figure 34 Metadata extractor ................................................................................................... 5207 March 2013 3 of 44
  • 8. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 35 Catalogue Search ..................................................................................................... 53Figure 36 Advanced search ...................................................................................................... 53Figure 37 Metadata Detail ........................................................................................................ 54Figure 38 Metadata Spatial Exten ............................................................................................ 54Figure 39 Catalogue Client architecture ................................................................................... 55Figure 40 Catalogue Import ..................................................................................................... 56Figure 41 Catalogue import ...................................................................................................... 56Figure 42 SuperCat harvesting ................................................................................................. 58Figure 43 Micka harvesting configuration ............................................................................... 59Figure 44 RSS channel – harvesting results ............................................................................. 60Figure 45 Heartbeat protocol .................................................................................................... 60Figure 46 Portal – metadata catalogue client ........................................................................... 62Figure 47 Mobile catalogue client ............................................................................................ 62Figure 48 Mobile catalogue client connected to central catalogue and map viewer showingfound WMS .............................................................................................................................. 63Figure 49 Illustration of relation between ExtJS and OpenLayers libraries inside of HSLayers................................................................................................................................................... 63Figure 50 HSlayers Map Portal ................................................................................................ 64Figure 51 Map Window ............................................................................................................ 65Figure 52 Physical and Logical Structure ................................................................................ 66Figure 53 HSLayers.OWS - Open Web Services client ........................................................... 68Figure 54 Printing with HSLayers............................................................................................ 69Figure 55 Printing Result ......................................................................................................... 70Figure 56 Web Map Content Editing........................................................................................ 72Figure 57 Permanent Link ........................................................................................................ 73Figure 58 Embedded ............................................................................................................... 74Figure 59 Result of the point query on one vector layer. ......................................................... 75Figure 60 User graphic ............................................................................................................. 75Figure 61 OGC WPS client ...................................................................................................... 76Figure 62 Image classifcation................................................................................................... 77Figure 63 Buffering .................................................................................................................. 77Figure 64 Sequence diagram of proxy4ows shows the negotiation between the client,proxy4ows middleware and the target server. .......................................................................... 79Figure 65 Invoking from catalogue .......................................................................................... 79Figure 66 WMS invoking ......................................................................................................... 80Figure 67 WMS Sequence diagram. ......................................................................................... 81Figure 68 WMS transformation result - left map coordinate system, right - transformed resultfrom EPSG:4326 source. .......................................................................................................... 81Figure 69 Composition Saving ................................................................................................. 82Figure 70 Open Composition from local disk .......................................................................... 83Figure 71 WFS invoking scheme ............................................................................................. 84Figure 72 Get Map Scheme ...................................................................................................... 85Figure 73 OWS Dispatch ......................................................................................................... 86Figure 74 Geoportal, Filter Encoding....................................................................................... 90Figure 75 Filter Encoding......................................................................................................... 91Figure 76 Filtering of WFS ...................................................................................................... 91Figure 77 WPS Invoking .......................................................................................................... 92Figure 78 Proxy ........................................................................................................................ 93Figure 79 HSLayers SOS client ............................................................................................... 9507 March 2013 4 of 44
  • 9. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 80 HSLayers Embeded ................................................................................................. 96Figure 81 Rendering Map......................................................................................................... 97Figure 82 Locus map app, Catalogue client ............................................................................. 99Figure 83 WMS displayed in Locus app, map legend............................................................ 100Figure 84 Parcel Info app ....................................................................................................... 100Figure 85 KML metadata in the catalogue client ................................................................... 101Figure 86 Displaying KML in Google Maps and Locus ........................................................ 102Figure 87 Simple mobile editing application ......................................................................... 103Figure 88 Filed editing results displayed online in Google Earth as KML ............................ 103Figure 89 Apache ODE .......................................................................................................... 105Figure 90 Orchestra ................................................................................................................ 106Figure 91 Taverna ................................................................................................................... 107Figure 92 Workflow modeller ................................................................................................ 108Figure 93 Eclipse BPEL ......................................................................................................... 109Figure 94 Humboldt Workflow Design ...................................................................................111Figure 95 Taverna Workbench................................................................................................ 112Figure 96 Aquatic Invasive Species ....................................................................................... 116Figure 97 Aquatic Invasive Species App ............................................................................... 116Figure 98 AIS classification ................................................................................................... 117Figure 99 Integration with RL ................................................................................................ 117Figure 100 AIS sighting ......................................................................................................... 118Figure 101 Ireland Pilot architecture ...................................................................................... 118Figure 102 Publishing ............................................................................................................ 119Figure 103 Sea Monitoring..................................................................................................... 120Figure 104 La Palma Pilot Scheme ........................................................................................ 120Figure 105 La Palma portal .................................................................................................... 121Figure 106 La Palma metadata ............................................................................................... 122Figure 107 Madonia Architecture........................................................................................... 123Figure 108 Madonia implementation ..................................................................................... 124Figure 109 Augment Reality Technology............................................................................... 125Figure 110 Android App ......................................................................................................... 126Figure 111 Augment Reality Scheme ..................................................................................... 126Figure 112 Augment Reality Implementation ........................................................................ 127Figure 113 Pilot portal ............................................................................................................ 128Figure 114 Pilot Metadata ...................................................................................................... 128Figure 115 Coastal HABITATS pilot is design ...................................................................... 130Figure 116 Latvian Pilot Implementation............................................................................... 131Figure 117 Latvian portal ....................................................................................................... 132Figure 118 Processing services .............................................................................................. 132Figure 119 FMI pilot scheme ................................................................................................. 134Figure 120 OPRL Data ........................................................................................................... 135Figure 121 Harmonised data publishing on RL ..................................................................... 138Figure 122 Invasive species on RL ........................................................................................ 139Figure 123 Invasive species on RL ........................................................................................ 139Figure 124 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=44b2ad495fd262b365f8fdb5310a1458 ................. 140Figure 125 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=8555142bd2d6f5462d4f766015bc4776 ................ 141Figure 126 Liberec Basic portal functionality ........................................................................ 14207 March 2013 5 of 44
  • 10. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 127 Liberec Thematic Maps using standardised data from FMI ................................ 142Figure 128 Flood portal as part of Geoportal ......................................................................... 143Figure 129 Education and awareness ..................................................................................... 143Figure 130 Integration of Open Linked data from skiing resorts ........................................... 144107 March 2013 6 of 44
  • 11. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas FiguresFigure 1 INSPIRE Networking Architecture............................................................................ 16Figure 2 Reverse “pyramid” effect (Bregt 2012). .................................................................... 18Figure 3 Spider Web Paradigm ................................................................................................. 19Figure 4 The changing sources of spatial data (Harris & Lafone). .......................................... 19Figure 5 Habitats Networking Architecture ............................................................................. 21Figure 6 Habitats RL and pilots................................................................................................ 21Figure 7 Habitats RL ................................................................................................................ 22Figure 8 URM concept ............................................................................................................. 24Figure 9 URM principles .......................................................................................................... 25Figure 10 URM Spidernet ........................................................................................................ 26Figure 11 Portal login ............................................................................................................... 30Figure 12 Portal registration ..................................................................................................... 31Figure 13 Liferay Interface....................................................................................................... 32Figure 14 Customisation of RL I .............................................................................................. 33Figure 15 Customisation of RL II ............................................................................................ 34Figure 16 Customisation of RL III ........................................................................................... 35Figure 17 Customisation of RL IV ........................................................................................... 36Figure 18 WordPress Based RL................................................................................................ 37Figure 19 WordPress Article Editing ........................................................................................ 38Figure 20 Micka Metadata Editing ........................................................................................... 40Figure 21 Micka Metadata Validation ...................................................................................... 40Figure 22 Micka Metadata importing ....................................................................................... 41Figure 23 Micka Metadata importing XML ............................................................................. 41Figure 24 Micka metadata importing WMC ............................................................................ 42Figure 25 Editing of Imported metadata .................................................................................. 42Figure 26 Validation result ....................................................................................................... 43Figure 27 Metadata records management ................................................................................ 43Figure 28 Slyling ...................................................................................................................... 47Figure 29 Editing of vector data ............................................................................................... 48Figure 30 Data flow between HS Layers and Geoserver. ........................................................ 49Figure 31 User (or administrator) can create thematic maps (map compositions) usingstandard OGC OWS client, part of the mapping application. .................................................. 50Figure 32 Ordering layers into groups, without touching the physical structure of displayedmaps.......................................................................................................................................... 50Figure 33 Changing the physical structure of displayed layers. In the "Physical view" tab,layers cannot be structured into groups, but their position in the layer tree (using drag&drop)can be changed. ........................................................................................................................ 51Figure 34 Metadata extractor ................................................................................................... 52Figure 35 Catalogue Search ..................................................................................................... 53Figure 36 Advanced search ...................................................................................................... 53Figure 37 Metadata Detail ........................................................................................................ 54Figure 38 Metadata Spatial Exten ............................................................................................ 54Figure 39 Catalogue Client architecture ................................................................................... 55Figure 40 Catalogue Import ..................................................................................................... 56Figure 41 Catalogue import ...................................................................................................... 56Figure 42 SuperCat harvesting ................................................................................................. 5807 March 2013 7 of 44
  • 12. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 43 Micka harvesting configuration ............................................................................... 59Figure 44 RSS channel – harvesting results ............................................................................. 60Figure 45 Heartbeat protocol .................................................................................................... 60Figure 46 Portal – metadata catalogue client ........................................................................... 62Figure 47 Mobile catalogue client ............................................................................................ 62Figure 48 Mobile catalogue client connected to central catalogue and map viewer showingfound WMS .............................................................................................................................. 63Figure 49 Illustration of relation between ExtJS and OpenLayers libraries inside of HSLayers................................................................................................................................................... 63Figure 50 HSlayers Map Portal ................................................................................................ 64Figure 51 Map Window ............................................................................................................ 65Figure 52 Physical and Logical Structure ................................................................................ 66Figure 53 HSLayers.OWS - Open Web Services client ........................................................... 68Figure 54 Printing with HSLayers............................................................................................ 69Figure 55 Printing Result ......................................................................................................... 70Figure 56 Web Map Content Editing........................................................................................ 72Figure 57 Permanent Link ........................................................................................................ 73Figure 58 Embedded ............................................................................................................... 74Figure 59 Result of the point query on one vector layer. ......................................................... 75Figure 60 User graphic ............................................................................................................. 75Figure 61 OGC WPS client ...................................................................................................... 76Figure 62 Image classifcation................................................................................................... 77Figure 63 Buffering .................................................................................................................. 77Figure 64 Sequence diagram of proxy4ows shows the negotiation between the client,proxy4ows middleware and the target server. .......................................................................... 79Figure 65 Invoking from catalogue .......................................................................................... 79Figure 66 WMS invoking ......................................................................................................... 80Figure 67 WMS Sequence diagram. ......................................................................................... 81Figure 68 WMS transformation result - left map coordinate system, right - transformed resultfrom EPSG:4326 source. .......................................................................................................... 81Figure 69 Composition Saving ................................................................................................. 82Figure 70 Open Composition from local disk .......................................................................... 83Figure 71 WFS invoking scheme ............................................................................................. 84Figure 72 Get Map Scheme ...................................................................................................... 85Figure 73 OWS Dispatch ......................................................................................................... 86Figure 74 Geoportal, Filter Encoding....................................................................................... 90Figure 75 Filter Encoding......................................................................................................... 91Figure 76 Filtering of WFS ...................................................................................................... 91Figure 77 WPS Invoking .......................................................................................................... 92Figure 78 Proxy ........................................................................................................................ 93Figure 79 HSLayers SOS client ............................................................................................... 95Figure 80 HSLayers Embeded ................................................................................................. 96Figure 81 Rendering Map......................................................................................................... 97Figure 82 Locus map app, Catalogue client ............................................................................. 99Figure 83 WMS displayed in Locus app, map legend............................................................ 100Figure 84 Parcel Info app ....................................................................................................... 100Figure 85 KML metadata in the catalogue client ................................................................... 101Figure 86 Displaying KML in Google Maps and Locus ........................................................ 102Figure 87 Simple mobile editing application ......................................................................... 10307 March 2013 8 of 44
  • 13. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 88 Filed editing results displayed online in Google Earth as KML ............................ 103Figure 89 Apache ODE .......................................................................................................... 105Figure 90 Orchestra ................................................................................................................ 106Figure 91 Taverna ................................................................................................................... 107Figure 92 Workflow modeller ................................................................................................ 108Figure 93 Eclipse BPEL ......................................................................................................... 109Figure 94 Humboldt Workflow Design ...................................................................................111Figure 95 Taverna Workbench................................................................................................ 112Figure 96 Aquatic Invasive Species ....................................................................................... 116Figure 97 Aquatic Invasive Species App ............................................................................... 116Figure 98 AIS classification ................................................................................................... 117Figure 99 Integration with RL ................................................................................................ 117Figure 100 AIS sighting ......................................................................................................... 118Figure 101 Ireland Pilot architecture ...................................................................................... 118Figure 102 Publishing ............................................................................................................ 119Figure 103 Sea Monitoring..................................................................................................... 120Figure 104 La Palma Pilot Scheme ........................................................................................ 120Figure 105 La Palma portal .................................................................................................... 121Figure 106 La Palma metadata ............................................................................................... 122Figure 107 Madonia Architecture........................................................................................... 123Figure 108 Madonia implementation ..................................................................................... 124Figure 109 Augment Reality Technology............................................................................... 125Figure 110 Android App ......................................................................................................... 126Figure 111 Augment Reality Scheme ..................................................................................... 126Figure 112 Augment Reality Implementation ........................................................................ 127Figure 113 Pilot portal ............................................................................................................ 128Figure 114 Pilot Metadata ...................................................................................................... 128Figure 115 Coastal HABITATS pilot is design ...................................................................... 130Figure 116 Latvian Pilot Implementation............................................................................... 131Figure 117 Latvian portal ....................................................................................................... 132Figure 118 Processing services .............................................................................................. 132Figure 119 FMI pilot scheme ................................................................................................. 134Figure 120 OPRL Data ........................................................................................................... 135Figure 121 Harmonised data publishing on RL ..................................................................... 138Figure 122 Invasive species on RL ........................................................................................ 139Figure 123 Invasive species on RL ........................................................................................ 139Figure 124 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=44b2ad495fd262b365f8fdb5310a1458 ................. 140Figure 125 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=8555142bd2d6f5462d4f766015bc4776 ................ 141Figure 126 Liberec Basic portal functionality ........................................................................ 142Figure 127 Liberec Thematic Maps using standardised data from FMI ................................ 142Figure 128 Flood portal as part of Geoportal ......................................................................... 143Figure 129 Education and awareness ..................................................................................... 143Figure 130 Integration of Open Linked data from skiing resorts ........................................... 144207 March 2013 9 of 44
  • 14. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas TablesTable 1 Testing WMS services results ...................................................................................... 61Table 2 Comparison of INSPIRE solutions and current mobile solutions ............................... 98307 March 2013 10 of 44
  • 15. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas IntroductionThe INSPIRE Directive considers that spatial information is needed for the implementation ofCommunity policies which must integrate environmental protection in accordance withArticle 6 of the Treaty, and establishes the basis for an infrastructure for spatial informationin Europe in order to support EU environmental policies and those activities which may havean impact on the environment. It defines 34 spatial data themes related to environmentalapplications and requires, in order to ensure that infrastructures of the Member States arecompatible and usable in a trans-boundary context, that common Implementing Rules areadopted for all Member States, in specific areas: Metadata, Data Specifications, NetworkServices, Data and Service Sharing and Monitoring and Reporting.The HABITATS project (Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EUHABITATS) focuses on the adoption of INSPIRE standards through a participatory process todesign and validate data, metadata and services specifications with real citizens andbusinesses.This deliverable presents the current status, the ongoing work, and the plans for theHABITATS Networking Services, which are series of specific networking service appletsdeployed and tested for data sharing within the project. The HABITATS networking serviceswill be ultimately deployed at two levels: • On the HABITATS Reference Laboratory as a central portal with the support of global data, but also supporting cross scenarios implementations; • HABITATS pilot applications, as implementations of single HABITATS pilot cases, which will also be used for testing the sharing of local data and metadata.The prototype set of services as implemented on the HABITATS Reference Laboratorygeoportal platform are described in the context of future pilot implementations.These follow from the HABITATS generic networking and data sharing architecture1, and itspossible logical components, based on user needs that were found in the pilots2 and will bevalidated by users on the basis of concrete implementations in second phase of the project3.Terms• discovery services – search for spatial data sets and services on the basis of the content of the corresponding metadata and to display the content of the metadata [INSPIRE Directive]• download services – services to copy of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to be downloaded and, where practicable, accessed directly [INSPIRE Directive]• feature – abstraction of real world phenomena [ISO 19101]• feature catalogue – catalogue(s) containing definitions and descriptions of the spatial object types, their attributes and associated components occurring in one or more spatial data sets, together with any operations that may be applied [ISO 19110 – modified]• infrastructure for spatial information – metadata, spatial data sets and spatial data services;1 Developed in D4.2.1 and D4.2.22 As reported in D5.2.1.3 To be reported in D2.4.3 and D5.4.207 March 2013 11 of 44
  • 16. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas network services and technologies; agreements on sharing, access and use; and coordination and monitoring mechanisms, processes and procedures, established, operated or made available in accordance with this Directive; [INSPIRE Directive]• INSPIRE application schema – application schema specified in an INSPIRE data specification• INSPIRE data specification – harmonised data product specification for a theme adopted as an Implementing Rule• metadata – information describing spatial data sets and spatial data services and making it possible to discover, inventory and use them [INSPIRE Directive]• services allowing – spatial data services to be invoked [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data – data with a direct or indirect reference to a specific location or geographic area [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data set – identifiable collection of spatial data [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial object – abstract representation of a real-world phenomenon related to a specific location or geographical area [INSPIRE Directive]• transformation services – services enabling spatial data sets to be transformed with a view to achieving interoperability [INSPIRE Directive]• view services – services to display, navigate, zoom in/out, pan, or overlay viewable spatial data sets and to display legend information and any relevant content of metadata [INSPIRE Directive]Abbreviations • API – Application Programming Interface • CMS – content management systems • CSW - Catalogue Service Web • EC – European Commission • EN - European Norm • ESA – European Space Agency • EU – European Union • GEOSS - Global Earth Observation System of Systems • GMES – Global Monitoring for Environment and Security • GML – Geography Markup Language • HTML – HyperText Markup Language • INSPIRE – INfrastructure for SPatial InfoRmation in Europe • ISO – International Organisation for Standardisation • KML – Keyhole Markup Language • OGC – Open Geospatial Consortium • RL – Reference Laboratory • SDI – Spatial Data Infrastructure • SEIS – Shared Environmental Information System • SOA – Service Oriented Architecture • UML – Unified Modelling Language • URI – Uniform Resource Identifier • URM – Uniform Resource Management • WCS – Web Coverage Map • WFS – Web Feature Map Service07 March 2013 12 of 44
  • 17. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • WMC – Web Map Context • WMS – Web Service Map • WPS – Web Processing Services07 March 2013 13 of 44
  • 18. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas4 INSPIRE, Networking Architecture and HABITATSIn order to validate the HABITATS networking services architecture defined in Task 4.2, aseries of specific service applets were deployed and tested for data sharing using theHABITATS Reference Laboratory (RL) geoportal platform.Comparing network services and spatial data services, the INSPIRE Forum4 definitions are: • Spatial data services are all services (Discovery, View, Download, Transformation, Invoke, Other) regarding spatial data. • Network services (Discovery, View, Download, Transformation, Invoke): • non-compliant network services are INSPIRE compliant services with respect to functionality; • compliant network services are compliant services with respect to functionality and quality of service.The HABITATS networking architecture supports INSPIRE Network services, but needs to gobehind this concept. INSPIRE networking services are in principle limited only to themanagement of existing data and metadata. The HABITATS Networking Services alsosupport such functionality with data and metadata management, data and metadata collection,working with non-spatial data, etc.The HABITATS service applets re-use existing applications where possible and arethemselves designed for re-use. The selection of the specific services to deploy is primarily auser-driven process, as defined in the user scenarios and requirements of task T2.3 and asrequired by the pilot validation platform of task T5.2. Task T4.3 has defined the prototype setof Network Service Applets to be installed in validation pilot platforms, as: • A series of specific networking service applets deployed and tested for data sharing within the project using the Network Service Architecture (of D4.2.1) • Interoperability Services • Enabling Services • Visualisation of information layers • Overlay of information from different sources • Spatial and Temporal Analysis • “quick” and “light” on-demand applets to meet validation pilot expectations and user needs • Usability, simplicity and openness to rapid prototyping mash-ups. • A set of specific service applets that allow users to identify, access, use and reuse habitats-related data, designed and deployed on-demand to meet user needs, • Users selected in the T2.3 user scenarios and T5.2 pilot validation platform. • Mobile Apps allowing use advantage of HABITATS RL • “Quick Prototyping” service applets respecting the HABITATS service architecture and developed on-demand.These are based on the outcomes from the earlier tasks and work with the HABITATS RL,and will now lead into the interface tools and toolkit.4 http://inspire-forum.jrc.ec.europa.eu/mod/groups/topicposts.php?topic=11135&group_guid=865107 March 2013 14 of 44
  • 19. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe HABITATS Networking Architecture aims to extend the principles of the INSPIREnetworking architecture, because INSPIRE doesn’t cover important aspects such as datamanagement and data collection. So all components of the INSPIRE networking architecturewill be included in the HABITATS architecture, but this concept will be extended by otherfunctionalities. From this point of view principles of GEOSS and GMES and also principlesof Shared Environmental Information System (SEIS) and Single Information Space in Europefor the Environment (SISE) have influenced the HABITATS architecture and its networkedservices.The development of the network service architecture process of WP4 was initiated through astate of the art analysis of existing SDI, to find out more about already existing infrastructuresand to examine how data should be shared and what services are required to enable sharing.When designing the networking architecture, a set of specific networking service applets wasdeployed and tested for data sharing within the project. Also the potential for re-use ofexisting application was taken into account.This Report deals also with the tools for invoking of Geospatial Services that arose within theHABITATS network architecture, interlinking different data sources and also interlinking datasources from different INSPIRE thematic areas.5 Invoking servicesThe definition of spatial data services included in the INSPIRE directive is the following:‘spatial data services’ means the operations which may be performed, by invoking a computerapplication, on the spatial data contained in spatial data sets or on the related metadata(INSPIRE 2007). ISO 19119 defines also taxonomy for Geospatial services (INSPIRE InvokeServices 2009): • Geographic human interaction services • Geographic model/information management services • Geographic workflow/task management services • Geographic processing services o Geographic processing services – spatial o Geographic processing services – thematic o Geographic processing services – temporal o Geographic processing services – metadata • Geographic communication services • Geographic system management services (HABITATS 2009)From INSPIRE Networking architecture, there are basic Networking services 1. Discovery Service (discovery): Is a services that makes it possible to search for spatial data sets and services on the basis of the content of the corresponding metadata and to display the content of the metadata. 2. View Service (view): Is a service that makes it possible, as a minimum, to display, navigate, zoom in and out, pan or overlay viewable spatial data sets and to display legend information and any relevant content of metadata. 3. Download Service (download): Is a service that enables copies of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to be downloaded and, where practicable, accessed directly.07 March 2013 15 of 44
  • 20. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 4. Transformation Service (transformation): Is a service that enables spatial data sets to be transformed with a view to achieving interoperability. 5. Invoke Spatial Data Service (invoke): Is a service that allows defining both the data inputs and data outputs expected by the spatial service and a workflow point of view 5The INSPIRE Spatial Data Service and Invoke Service – Draft, implements rules defining thatInvoke service has to be accessible via Internet and offers a mean to invoke the linked spatialdata services. Invoke shall support in order to allow clients invoking spatial data services.Taking into account the potentially wide diversity of interfaces and protocols, invoke servicesare services that allow access to sufficient service metadata to enable the activation orexecution of the spatial data service. The document updated the basic INSPIRE architecturescheme and defined sets of requirements for INSPIRE Invoking services.Figure 1 INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureThe requirements are divided into two groups of requirements: • IR Requirement - Are requirements that are reflected in the Implementing Rule on interoperability of spatial data sets and services are shown using this style. • SDS Requirement - Requirements that are not reflected in the Implementing Rule on interoperability of spatial data sets and services are shown using this style.Document INSPIRE Spatial Data Services and Invoke Service define also set ofrecommendation.INVOKING service requirements and recommendations • IR Requirement 1 The implementing rules are restricted to spatial data services that relate to spatial data sets in themes in Annex I-III, or to their related metadata. • Recommendation 1 There shall be no other requirements applicable to ALL spatial data services than the establishment of discovery metadata. • Recommendation 2 A spatial data service in this context shall have clearly defined interfaces for machine-to-machine communication. A Geographic Information System or other systems, understood as a set of tools for collecting, processing and storing5 INSPIRE Spatial Data Services and Invoke Service – Draft, implementing rules,Draft_IR_SDS_and_Invoke_1.0.doc07 March 2013 16 of 44
  • 21. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas spatial data, should not be considered an invokable spatial data service from the perspective of the relevant Implementing Rules. But any specific functionality included in it, and with a well-defined and exposed interface, could be an invokable spatial data service. • IR Requirement 2 Interoperability arrangements in the INSPIRE context shall be related to invokable spatial data services. • IR Requirement 3 Requirements for interoperability arrangements are only mandatory for spatial data services operating upon harmonised data (i.e. spatial data sets conformant to the regulation for IDSS). • IR Requirement 4 A spatial data service conformant to interoperability arrangement shall support coordinate reference systems according to Annex II.1 of the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1089/2010 . • IR Requirement 5 The default temporal reference system referred to in point 5 of part B of the Annex to Commission Regulation (EC) No 1205/2008 shall be used, unless other temporal reference systems are specified for a specific spatial data theme in Annex I-III. • IR Requirement 6 A spatial data service conformant to the interoperability arrangement shall be available 99% of time. • IR Requirement 7 A spatial data service conforming to interoperability arrangement returning spatial objects as part of the output, shall encode those spatial objects according to Article 7 of Commission Regulation (EU) No 1089/2010 of 23 November 2010 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards interoperability of spatial data sets and services. • IR Requirement 8 All spatial data services conformant to the interoperability arrangements shall include a Get Service Metadata operation. • IR Requirement 9 Newly developed spatial data services operating upon harmonised data or their metadata shall be conformant with interoperability arrangements. • IR Requirement 10 Any harmonised spatial data service shall follow the interoperability arrangements. • IR Requirement 11 Any harmonised spatial data service shall have minimal performance criteria defined in the same way as network services, i.e. performance, capacity, and availability. The values will depend upon the character of the type of service. • Recommendation 5 The gazetteer service should be related to harmonised datasets conforming to Addresses, Geographical names and Administrative boundaries. i.e. Location instances should be fetched from these three themes, and correspondingly the Location type should be either an address, a geographical name, or an administrative polygon. • IR Requirement 12 A registry service shall be compliant with ISO 19135:2005, Geographic information -- Procedures for item registration.07 March 2013 17 of 44
  • 22. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas6 Problems of Policy Driven SDIINSPIRE is politically driven top down approach. It is important to see how INSPIREreflects local, regional and national needs. Currently, there is low awareness on regional leveland the benefits for the local level are no clearly defined. During the JRC Cost benefitworkshop in 2012 the schema depicted in next figure was presented.Figure 2 Reverse “pyramid” effect (Bregt 2012).The schema shows the relation between the level of governance and the amount of benefits.The HABITATS idea is to find a solution how to turn the green triangle upside down. It is alsovital for successful implementation of INSPIRE.The authors identified three areas where special attention needs to be given for successfulimplementation of the INSPIRE Directive: • metadata; • networking architecture;The INSPIRE architecture doesn’t reflect the needs of regions regarding data collection andupdating. Usually, for different pilots’ needs, the generic INSPIRE architecture has to bemodified, extended or reduced. (Charvát 2011)Global SDI building is usually described in a form of a pyramid. Current practices prove that“spider web infrastructure building”, where different local or global levels are able to directlyshare data, is more efficient. The HABITATS intention is to shift SDI from the pyramid to thespider web paradigm.07 March 2013 18 of 44
  • 23. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 3 Spider Web ParadigmNeogeographyThere exist a large number of different voluntary or bottom-up initiatives supporting buildingof different parts of SDI. The SDI world is changing with development of new GPS devices,smartphones, mobile cameras and tablets. More and more localised information is collectedby citizens. For such type of data collection “people as sensors” or “human sensors” terms areoften used. This means that “human observations” can be part of future real-time SDIs andserve as an input for spatial decision-making processes. Current use and collection of data bycitizens is higher than collection of data by public bodies. Such process is depicted in nextFigure.Figure 4 The changing sources of spatial data (Harris & Lafone).Local and community activities capture local knowledge in multiple media forms including07 March 2013 19 of 44
  • 24. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasvideos, photos or oral histories. The collected information can contribute to up-to-date data.The term neogeography is used for these methods. It is related to new ApplicationProgramming Interfaces (APIs), Web 2.0 and the mapping capabilities of the Geospatial Web.People can create “geotagged” information from mobile devices. This new technology opensnew possibilities. Neogeography represents a new way of collection and geographicknowledge production using interactive technologies, interfaces and technical expertise. Thesemethodologies bring serious challenges to SDIs and traditional forms of data acquisition,analysis, and publication. (Harris & Lafone forthcoming)7 HABITATS Networking ServicesThe intention of the HABITATS Networking Services is to provide shift from classicalINSPIRE (GEOSS, GMESS architecture) towards solution, which will support local andregional SDI building and their interaction with INSPIRE and also, which will movestandards SDI model towards Neography and SpiderWeb paradigm. The way to test andprovide it is Reference Laboratory as key tool of HABITATS Networking architecture.The HABITATS architecture defines a platform-neutral SDI with a basic set of networkingservices in compliance with the INSPIRE Directive for sharing environmental data, especiallythat related to the 4 INSPIRE themes of 16.Sea-Regions (SR), 17. Bio-geographical Regions(BR), 18. HABITATS and Biotopes (HB) and 19. Species Distribution (SD). This will resultin a European Metadata profile for these four data themes, which will be an extension of theINSPIRE profile. Our intention is not only to follow the INSPIRE profile for discoveryservices, but to also reflect on the extension the profiles for using data; a link to datamodelling activities is therefore necessary. This profile is further open to extension by singlecountries or user groups, but the aim is that it be respected as a minimum set.The set of HABITATS Networking Services have been implemented on the HABITATSReference Laboratory (RL) geoportal platform6. This acts as a client of the 7 HABITATSpilots that provides a very rich set of cross-pilots, inter-regional and enabling services.Reference LabThe reference laboratory is the central hub of the HABITATS Networking Architecture. Itconsists of several layers, which are (HABITATS D4.2.2 2011): • Data layers – management data and files on storage, eventually guarantee access to external sensors Server (engine layer) – defines tools, which guarantee basic services on the server side – supplying service Client layer – is client side of web services, which guarantee access of users to services • Application layer is some form of wrapping elementary client services into application or into such form, which could be used by other web tools and social media.Presentation layer contain such web tools, which allow to combine and publish single objectsfrom the application level as part of Web presentationThe illustration below (taken from HABITATS D4.2.2 2011) shows the different layers of theHABITATS Networking Architecture.6 www.habitats.cz07 March 2013 20 of 44
  • 25. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 5 Habitats Networking ArchitectureThe final implementation of the HABITATS Services anticipates that selected concreteservices will be deployed for every pilot, and that there will be one central platform (i.e. theReference Laboratory).Figure 6 Habitats RL and pilots07 March 2013 21 of 44
  • 26. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe HABITATS RL provides the Networking Architecture supporting both NetworkingServices and Spatial Data services, that support the SDI network services to enable trans-European sharing of habitats-related spatial data between public authorities and otherstakeholders in the Community, enabling the creation of value added services. The RL isfocused on implementation of: • Cross pilot scenarios based on sharing of data among more pilots • Validation platform for testing of conformity of implemented pilot services • Services supporting global discovery, view and downloading • Repository for common metadata • Repository for pan European datasets such as Natura 2000, CLC, Urban Atlas and Open Street Maps • Interlink with social networksThe RL provides the Networking Architecture, that supports the SDI network services toenable trans-European sharing of habitats-related spatial data between public authorities andother stakeholders in the Community enabling the creation of value added services.The RL enables deployment of specific service applets, including interoperability andenabling services, on-demand from user communities and the pilots for initial implementationand validation. It is being developed further to include an invoking service toolkit integratingthe service applets with the goal of facilitating the development of end-user services accessinghabitats-related spatial data over timeHowever applications are the key objectives and final goal of using the HABITATS RL. Asthe RL is just a geoportal tool to help to build applications that address the Pilots’ typical usecases.The HABITATS RL is• an interface that enables interactive search, portrayal, evaluation, sharing, analyse and reuse of spatial and non-spatial data.• a solution based on interoperable standards (OGC, W3C, OASIS, ISO). It is interconnected to other resources through the Internet. It helps to create a distributed structure of information and knowledge with spatial position.Figure 7 Habitats RLHowever the RL is not a central data storage or a closed web application with maps. It is ageoportal with07 March 2013 22 of 44
  • 27. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Independent components • Composition according to user requirements • Based on SOA • Possibility to integrate with other resources • Maximum openness • Open Source • Open Standards • Extension to non-GIS community • Open Search • Administration of other (non-spatial) data sourcesThe HABITATS RL allows deployment of the current state of the art of technologicalsolutions, which will be tested and adopted by the HABITATS partners and user stakeholders.It allows testing of current existing technology and generation of further research tasks drivenby users. The RL also collects information coming from other projects, which is an importantinput for the HABITATS analysis and public discussion. The methods of social assessmentwill be an increasingly important part of the RL.Thus the RL’s networking services aim to help HABITATS to extend user-centric, co-designapproaches into the arena of standards design and adoption processes, considering standardsinitiatives such as INSPIRE, OGC, UNSDI to be significant social, economic and institutionalinnovations. The elements of the approach are maintained, applying the model at all levelsfrom the global scale to the local and regional policies that frame many HABITATS validationpilots. Community building activities follow a Web 2.0 approach to capture the knowledge inactive user communities with a strong interest in contributing to the standards developmentprocess. By inviting a broad multi-sectoral and inter-disciplinary range of concernedstakeholders to participate into the HABITATS network, a viral motivation spiral is set off. Apeer-to-peer approach to opening up information sources and providing access to contentensures a rapid extension of the critical mass of environmental data established by projectpartners.Uniform Resource Management (URM) ConceptUniform Resource Management (URM) provides a framework in which communities canshare information and knowledge through description, which is easily understandable insideof the community. It is based on a standardised schema supporting a uniform description ofinformation and knowledge including common vocabularies. The schema defines themeaning, characteristics and relationships of a set of properties, and includes constraints onpotential values and the inheritance of properties from other schemas. The URM concept hasbeen defined and developed through the NaturNet-Redime project and extended by c@r tosupport knowledge sharing inside a community (Charvát et al. 2008).07 March 2013 23 of 44
  • 28. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 8 URM conceptUniform Resource Management supports validation, discovery and access to heterogeneousinformation and knowledge. It is based on utilisation of metadata schemas. The URM modelscurrently integrate different tools, which support sharing of knowledge. Geoportal containscommon visualisation, data sharing, metadata and catalogue functionalities. It includes alsotools for sensor observation management and spatial data transformation and processing.The principle of the URM allows to build a "spider web" infrastructure supportinginterconnection of portals and effective exchange of information. This concept is also morerelated to GEOSS and Single Information Space for Environment (SISE) principles.Many context attributes characterize the environmental information or knowledge. From thepoint of view of context, the information or knowledge can involve different parties: • Information or knowledge provider i.e. a party supplying the resource; • Custodian accepts accountability and responsibility for the resources and ensures appropriate care and maintenance of the resource; • Owner of the resource; • User, who uses the resource; • Distributor who distributes the resource; • Originator who created the resource; • Point of Contact to be contacted for acquiring knowledge about or acquisition of the resource; • Principal investigator responsible for gathering information and conducting research; • Processor who has processed the data in a manner such that the original resource has been modified; • Publisher, i.e. party who published the resource; • Author, i.e. party who authored the resource.The HABITATS RL is a new integrated solution designed as a combination of previoustechnologies - Uniform Resource Management, Geohosting and new technologicaldevelopment of a visualization client based on HSLayers. The URM Geoportal is not oneintegrated solution, but a set of modules and services, which can communicate throughinteroperable services (OGC, W3C). The solution is modular and can be readily modified for07 March 2013 24 of 44
  • 29. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasdifferent purposes. The URM Geoportal is based on Open Source technologies, but it can beintegrated with different technologies such as MS SQL or ArcSDE. The Uniform ResourceManagement (URM) supports validation, discovery and access to heterogeneous informationand knowledge. It is based on utilization of metadata schemas. The URM models currentlyalso integrate different tools, which support sharing of knowledge.The URM Geoportal contains: Metadata Catalogue client Visualization client Metadata Editor Geoserver Styler Metadata Extractor Enterprise management tools Content management Social Networks toolsFigure 9 URM principlesThe HABITATS RL geoportal contains common visualization, data sharing, metadata andcatalogue functionalities. Additional parts of the solution can also be tools for management ofsensor observation and spatial data transformation and processing.The core part of the RL is the metadata system, which guarantees access to all informationstored in the portal07 March 2013 25 of 44
  • 30. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe URM concept also allows access to any information stored on one portal with otherportals that use the URM principles.Figure 10 URM SpidernetSo the URM allows a "spidernet" SISE (Single Information Space for the Environment inEurope) infrastructure supporting interconnection of portals to be built with the effectiveexchange of informationUSE OF THE URM IN THE HABITATS RLThe HABITATS RL portal is based on the Uniform Resource Management (URM) conceptand was designed to aid awareness raising, training, presentation and sharing of knowledgeand tools within Living Labs (LL). Its first design was made in the Naturnet Redime researchproject7, it is also used by EnviroGrids BlackSee project for implementation of GEOSSinfrastructure8 and its design and development continues into the current HABITATS project.It is built as an interoperable network for an effective exchange of the information,knowledge, and services relating to its multi- and interdisciplinary subject matters inside ofLL or among LLs. The portal is implemented using AJAX technology (WEB 2) supporting aneasy management of information within the portal and enabling an easy context awareness forknowledge discovery using the URM. This URM concept supports a sharing of knowledgewithin the community using metadata and catalogue standards for information description anddiscovery. The system for authorization and support for a unique login for all components is7 See www.naturnet.org8 See www.envirogrids.net07 March 2013 26 of 44
  • 31. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasalso an important part of the portal.The portal supports those users searching for information dealing with the subjects ofsustainability, environmental protection and management and is also a place for others topublish related information and resources.It is possible to search by terms within several categories (this list of categories is not limitedand can be changed or increased). Firstly, the user can choose from one of several possiblefolders (‘all’, ‘documents only’, ‘projects’, ‘maps’, etc.) by selecting the tabs at the top of thepage, which enable the user to search using their SEARCH TERM either more generally orwithin a restricted range. The (main panel) window then displays the results of a search withinthe catalogued information. The user can check the metadata for any of the listed items or canrun the application or view the document in those cases where the listed items are directlylinked to a document or an application.An extended search allows searching for information in a variety of ways. Users can choosefrom any of the parameters listed in the left window or use the map window. The map windowoffers a way to select the geographic area in which the user is particularly interested. Userscan select by country or a smaller detailed area from the whole of Europe using the selectionrectangle for zooming.A combination of both windows provides a better opportunity to precisely specify the requiredinformation. • Publishing user documents on the URM portal. o Users can use the Metadata Extractor, to find their file on their computer; using the Metadata Extractor (file searching), ask for extraction of the available metadata, then complete the missing metadata and publish their file and its metadata on the URM portal. • Publishing of user Web pages on the URM portal. o Users can publish any Web content through the URM portal. They put their web address (URL) into the metadata extractor and extract the metadata. Edit the missing records in the metadata (including a selection for the type of their content) and then save the metadata. • Registration of user metadata system on the URM portal. o If a user has a catalogue system supporting the following profiles (ISO 19115, ISO 19119 and Dublin Core ISO 15836-2003 and supporting the Catalogue Service for the Web (for instance using MICKA or GeoNetwork) they can ask for registration of their catalogue on the URM portal. • Registration of data or services directly from a user application. o An applications developer who directly publishes interactive Web data or services, can ask for the CSW client, which will support direct registration of their results in the catalogue. • Publishing using URM tools. o Users may use the independent URM tools for working with their data, or for their integration into new systems and presentation in e-learning or web services forms.URM Tools that are available on the HABITATS RL are described in the followingsubsections.07 March 2013 27 of 44
  • 32. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas8 RL Networking Services and Invoking ToolsThe HABITATS RL is designed and implemented as a virtual database. It uses principles ofweb services, Uniform Resource Management (URM)9, social network sites,Geoportal4everybody10 and the Semantic Web. It integrates different technologies such asGIS, e-learning, multimedia, and virtual reality. An important element is its integration ofsocial networking tools supporting social assessment. These services are not implemented onthe HABITATS portal directly, but are implemented as virtual services in different placesacross Europe.In HABITATS we are dealing with the broader understanding of Invoking Services. We willconsider this as a possibility to invoke any type of geospatial services according to ISO19119classification with platform. This means running services without the necessity to have anyapplication on the client side. In this first version of the deliverable we are dealing withinvoking service using Reference Laboratory.The HABITATS RL includes the following types of tools: • Authorization and authentication tools • Content management, Enterprise Management System and Social networking tools o Professional version based on Liferay o Light version based on WordPress • Uniform Resource Manager tools, including o Metadata management tools o SDI management supporting tools, • HABITATS Networking Services and Invoking toolsThese are currently implemented with the following specific tools: • Authorization and authentication tools - guarantee access to all applications on the RL • Liferay or WordPress - allows editing of the home page of the Unified Resource Management portal. • Uniform Resource Management (URM) which includes: o MICKA11 - for spatial data / services metadata management according to ISO, OGC and INSPIRE standards. The system can implement any standard based on XML documents. o Data Management Tools including Geoserver- an application for management of spatial data. Styler - The software tool allowing users to prepare map composition and visualisation. • Metadata extractor12 – The main purpose of the HABITATS RL is to take care of spatial data, but there can also be a need to publish non-spatial data (e.g. documents, web pages). This is done by the Metadata9 Described at www.habitats.cz/simplecms/?articleId=19&action=article&presenter=ArticleDetail10 See http://www.habitats.cz/simplecms/?articleId=16&action=article&presenter=ArticleDetail11 See http://www.ccss.cz/en/?menuID=49&articleID=76&action=article&presenter=ArticleDetail12 See www.ccss.cz/en/?menuID=49&articleID=76&action=article&presenter=ArticleDetail07 March 2013 28 of 44
  • 33. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Extractor, which is very easy to use, and only requires to specify which file or URL is to be published. The Metadata Extractor extracts the metadata and stores them on the portal. Metadata is stored by MICKA in the Dublin Core standard which is designed for non-spatial data. The Metadata extractor also allows whole pages to be published. This is done by uploading a Zip file which contains these pages. • Networking Services o Catalogue client13 - allows searching through connected metadata catalogues by the catalogue service OGC CSW. Data can be searched by text or by elements defined in standards (OGC CSW 2.0.2, AP ISO, INSPIRE). Basic elements can be extended by user demands. These elements are not searchable in other connected catalogues. The first version of the catalogue uses cascading of multiple services. o MapViewer - (developed by HSRS) is a JavaScript-based WebGIS map application built using the HSLayers JavaScript library. It extends OpenLayers and adds new functionalities including WMS and WFS client, printing of hard copy maps, vector editing capabilities and others. Several features, which are still in the INSPIRE proposal stage (e.g. transformation service), are used as well.In addition the HABITATS RL can connect different desktop GIS tools as externalapplications. These tools are not directly part of the solution, as they are more related toeducational content.13 http://ccss.posterous.com/?page=307 March 2013 29 of 44
  • 34. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasAuthorization and Authentication toolsThe RL is composed of independent components (modules). The information provided can bemade publicly available and every user is authorised to access it without authentication. Forthe cases where the information can be for example viewed or modified by only restrictedgroup of people, the authentication and authorisation mechanisms are put in place.Authorisation and authentication terms are often used interchangeably. The followingdefinitions should clarify the difference between them.Authentication is a mechanism that securely identifies user within a system. It verifies theidentity of the user by for example a password or a fingerprint.Authorisation is a mechanism that specifies access rights to the content or other resources.In other words, authentication is the process of verifying that "you are who you say you are",authorisation is the process of verifying that "you are permitted to do what you are trying todo." Authorisation thus presuppose authentication. (Wikipedia contributors 2012a).The RL enables users to control access to all their resources stored on the geoportal using theauthentication and authorisation mechanisms. Registered users can be authenticated bycredentials including the email address and a password.Figure 11 Portal loginUnregistered users can create an account using a simple form by filling in a name, date ofbirth, gender, username and email address. The creation of the user account is protected byCAPTCHA14 ensuring that the form is filled by a person.14 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAPTCHA07 March 2013 30 of 44
  • 35. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 12 Portal registrationThe registration of users as well as the provision of permissions (authorisation) can bemanaged by the system administrator. RL uses its own mechanism for authentication/authorisation by LDAP (LightweightDirectory Access Protocol). This will ensure that each server will act independently from theothers. It will also provide better data protection and better access control on thecorresponding level. Upper level portal users may have access to private data by cascading user rightsthrough the infrastructure. Each node will have mechanism for saving user access to otherservers for authorised users. Also a masking mechanism will be used to avoid access torestricted datasets.Liferay based geoportal solutionThe RL is based on Liferay15 solution. It is a web platform orchestrating all the geoportalcomponents and other gadgets, portlets, pages etc. Liferay allows editing the web pages (partof the geoportal interface) and their content. Liferay enables administrators to: • define the content and the system of the menu; • publish articles, images, links etc.; • publish predefined map compositions;15 http://www.liferay.com/07 March 2013 31 of 44
  • 36. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • publish RSS channels. There are many other functions that can be used and that are described in detail in themanual of Liferay available at http://www.liferay.com/. Liferay is focused on usability andsimplicity for end users but also on clarity and security of the implementation.The administrator can define the menu of the geoportal and its submenus. Any menu orsubmenu can incorporate external web links. The user can publish articles using the contentholders. A WYSIWYG16 editor provides a good user experience for beginners. The contentholders support HTML code for advanced users. The editor allows inserting variousmultimedia content including You Tube videos, photos, SlideShare presentation etc. The printscreen of the content editor is in next Figure.Figure 13 Liferay InterfaceThe geoportal supports RSS and GeoRSS feeds that can be displayed from remote sites. Thisenables a straightforward and easy way of promoting the RL services. RSS (most commonlyexpanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publishfrequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in astandardised format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel")includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Webfeeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. They benefit readers16 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WYSIWYG07 March 2013 32 of 44
  • 37. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituaswho want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds frommany sites into one place. (Wikipedia contributors 2012c).GeoRSS is an emerging standard for encoding location as part of a Web feed. In GeoRSS,location content consists of geographical points, lines, and polygons of interest and relatedfeature descriptions. (Wikipedia contributors 2012b).CUSTOMISATION OF THE PORTAL CONTENTThe portal administrator can customise the content of each web page. Texts, images, You Tubevideos, SlideShare presentations and other content can be easily added. Next figures show thesteps of adding web content to the website including texts and images. .Figure 14 Customisation of RL I07 March 2013 33 of 44
  • 38. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 15 Customisation of RL II07 March 2013 34 of 44
  • 39. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 16 Customisation of RL III07 March 2013 35 of 44
  • 40. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 17 Customisation of RL IVWordPress based GeoSocial NetworkWordPress is web software you can use to create a beautiful website or blog. WordPress isboth free and priceless at the same time. WordPress plugins can extend WordPress to doalmost anything. Plugins are developed by the community and to find proper plugin issometimes difficult. This is also the case of adding geospatial information to each blog orstatic page. None of the plugins fulfil the expected behaviour and features. Features we werelooking for are: 1. User can draw mark region, which has some relation to written blogpost. 2. Region will be displayed in the map while reader of the blog post is reading. 3. There is standardized way how to collect this geospatial information across the whole blog.This features are developed in the new plug-in.07 March 2013 36 of 44
  • 41. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUser can add, delete and modify any type of geometryFigure 18 WordPress Based RL07 March 2013 37 of 44
  • 42. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 19 WordPress Article EditingBased on geolocated blog posts, GeoRSS is generated, which can be consumed by variousservices and clients.07 March 2013 38 of 44
  • 43. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUniform Resource Management (URM)MICKAMICKA17 is a meta information catalogue that fully complies with the ISO 19115 standardand is fully compliant with the INSPIRE principles. It can be integrated with mapapplications. It is multilingual. The web catalogue service uses OGC specifications.MICKA is a complex system for metadata management used for building Spatial DataInfrastructure (SDI) and geoportal solutions. It contains tools for editing and management ofmetadata for spatial information, web services and other sources (documents, web sites, etc.).It includes online metadata search engine , portrayal of spatial information and download ofspatial data to local computer.MICKA is compatible with obligatory standards for European SDI building (INSPIRE).Therefore it is ready to be connected with other nodes of prepared networked metadatacatalogues (its compatibility with pilot European geoportal is continuously being tested).Functions include: • Spatial data metadata (ISO 19115) • Spatial services metadata (ISO 19119) • Dublin Core metadata (ISO 15836) • Feature catalogue support (ISO 19110) • OGC CSW 2.0.2 support (catalogue service) • User defined metadata profiles • INSPIRE metadata profile • Web interface for metadata editing • Multilingual (both user interface and metadata records). Currently 16 languages are supported. It is possible to dynamically extend the system for other languages. • Context help (multilingual) • Import from the following metadata formats are supported: o ESRI ArcCatalog, o ISO 19139, o OGC services (WMS, WFS, WCS, CSW) o Feature catalogue XML • Export – ISO 19139, GeoRSS • Support of thesauri and gazetteers. • Display of changes with GeoRSS • Template base interface with possibilities to change according to user requirements • Possibility of deep cooperation with any map clients for display of on-line map services.17 See http://www.ccss.cz/en/?menuID=49&articleID=76&action=article&presenter=ArticleDetail07 March 2013 39 of 44
  • 44. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 20 Micka Metadata EditingMICKA stores metadata in a relational database and it is edited by dynamically generatedforms. Therefore it is possible to amend other standards or profiles. It is possible to switchbetween profiles while editing. Individual profiles can be distributed into sections. With thehelp of control elements it is possible to duplicate individual items, select from code lists orconnect to supporting applications. Checking of mandatory items is enabled while editing.The MICKA integrated application is divided into 3 independent components: • Metadata creation • Metadata importing • Metadata ManagementMetadata editing tools and metadata importing tools communicate with MetadataManagement through the CSW protocol. This allows use of two tools independently on theone MICKA system (for instance a user could integrate with GeoNetwork).Metadata editing supports the editing of metadata records using a selected profile, as follows:Figure 21 Micka Metadata Validation07 March 2013 40 of 44
  • 45. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasWhile downloading storage and validation is handled as follows:Figure 22 Micka Metadata importingMetadata importing support from xml files is as follows:Figure 23 Micka Metadata importing XMLor directly harvest metadata from GetCapabilities of selected OGC services, as follows:07 March 2013 41 of 44
  • 46. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 24 Micka metadata importing WMCAfter harvesting, metadata can be edited, downloaded, stored or validated, as illustrated in thefollowing screen grabs:Figure 25 Editing of Imported metadata07 March 2013 42 of 44
  • 47. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 26 Validation resultThe MICKA metadata management system supports deleting, updating and copying metadatarecords.Figure 27 Metadata records managementGEOSERVERData managementData are uploaded to the system on portal upload page. If necessary the FTP server isprovided to enable upload of larger datasets.Two basic concepts of handling the data are considered: • File based approach – this approach is suitable for static data that are not going to be updated too often. This approach uses original file as source of the data without any07 March 2013 43 of 44
  • 48. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas change. This solution enables uploading of new version of while as whole but is not ideal for making changes of data subsets. This solution is also ideal for raster data but can be considered for vectors as well. • Database approach – Data are imported into database. Data changes can be then maintained inside the database and each spatial feature or subset can be updated. This solution is more demanding for implementation as well as data maintenance policy. Details must be fixed during the second step of implementation. This solution is ideal for vector data that are changing frequently.Supported formats are: • Shapefile for vector data; • GeoTIFF for raster data.Shapefile is physically represented by several files (at least *.shp, *.dbf, *.shx). Due to thisfact these files must be zipped into one file for upload. The zip name will not be used forserver-side processing.After uploading of data in file format, the data might be converted from original format to therelational database management system (PostgreSQL + PostGIS). This step is not necessaryand can be discussed during the second step of implementation. Handling the data in thedatabase brings more capabilities for data maintenance.User interface functionality: • Data upload; • Browsing existing data on the server; • Renaming or deleting data; • Importing data into database. Database can track changes in data and log all updates. The policy how data are going to be updated depends on particular use case. • Uploaded data will be automatically exposed as data sources for Geoserver.Features: • Uploaded zip file will be unzipped on the server and put in user’s directory. • Name conflicts will be automatically solved by adding suffix or overwriting may be allowed if confirmed. • Uploaded file maximum size may be configured by the portal administrator. • Coordinate system will be automatically read form shapefile *.prj file, if present. If not, the user must set it in Geoserver manually.Data visualisationTo be able to display newly uploaded data there are possibility to configure the way how theywill be provided to user. In general two basic concepts are considered: 1. Data are provided in raster format – in this case the data are rendered on server07 March 2013 44 of 44
  • 49. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas side by applying data Style in SLD format on original data. Rendered raster are then served using WMS service (Web map service). For performance booth this rendered data can be efficiently cached on server side. This approach is optimal for large scale data that doesnt change too often. 2. Data are provided as a vector data and they are rendered directly in Java script client. For this case the OGC WFS or KML is used. This approach is ideal for overlay data that might be frequently edited.For data service there is Geoserver used. The user interface functionality that are configuresuch services are: • Administrator can choose and configure particular data from Data Store (directory of shape files, directory of raster data, spatial database) so that they can be published on portal as new Data Layer. • Administrator can configure particular form of the web service for this Data Layer. WMS, WFS and KML will be supported. • Administrator can assign predefined style in SLD format to particular Data Layer. • Administrator can configure user rights that will limit the access to these data. Generally each Data Layer can have a access mode to be read, written or administrated. • Configure the caching strategy and other caching details. • Data Layers can be also grouped to Workspaces where the whole Workspace can have common rights or restrictions.Map compositionsThe map composition can contain the user’s own data from the internal server as well as otherexternal data sources. All these data sources can be used for the creation of new mapcompositions in the web interface. The web services can be accessed in two ways. Either bytyping the address of the web service or by searching the web service in the connectedmetadata catalogue. Data can be in raster as well as in vector form. Vector data can bevisualised in various colours and/or symbols. Access rights can be defined for each mapcomposition. Each composition is also tagged with a metadata sentence and registered in themetadata catalogue.Data publicationThe user can set up the parameters for the publication of the new composition according to therequirements. This enables access by other users. Such new map compositions can beportrayed by the user by two means. It can be done either using web browsers (Open Layers,Google Map, DHTML client) or using desktop viewers (GoogleEarth). The map compositionscan be published as a brand new web service (WMS or WFS).07 March 2013 45 of 44
  • 50. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe new map compositions can be used for example in mobile devices and e-learningapplications. This solution is of particular advantage to those working in a big team orsupplying information to the public. The system is fully compliant with the INSPIREprinciples.Web Map Server includes tools, which support publishing of locally stored data (filesystem,RDBMS) in the form of web services. The basic required services are: • A Web Map Service (WMS) is a standard protocol for serving geo-referenced map images over the Internet that are generated by a map server using data from a GIS database • A Styled Layer Descriptor (SLD) is an XML schema specified by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for describing the appearance of map layers. It is capable of describing the rendering of vector and raster data. A typical use of SLDs is to instruct a Web Map Service (WMS) of how to render a specific layer. • Web Feature Service Interface Standard (WFS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical features across the web using platform-independent calls. One can think of geographical features as the "source code" behind a map, whereas the WMS interface or online mapping portals like Google Maps return only an image, which end-users cannot edit or spatially analyse. • Web Coverage Service Interface Standard (WCS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical coverages across the web using platform-independent calls. The coverages are objects (or images) in a geographical area, whereas the WMS interface or online mapping portals like Google Maps return only an image, which end-users cannot edit or spatially analyse.StylerIn order to be able to style uploaded vector data files, SLD editor is used. We setup Stylerapplication, where the user can prepare his/her layer styles, using easy-to-use graphical tool.User can create styles for each feature type based on its geometry type (point/line/polygon) orattribute features. Styles are stored in form of SLD within the GeoServer administrationinterface, for later usage.07 March 2013 46 of 44
  • 51. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 28 SlylingVector data editingLogged-in user is able to provide basic vector data editing including modifying vectorfeatures geometries as well as their attributes. 1. In the first step, user has to activate the editing panel. 2. In the second step, user has to define which vector features will be modified. The application doesn’t allow the user to edit the whole dataset in place due to high client load. Only several (1-5) features at once are changed. 3. When the editing operation is done and user is satisfied with modifications, data are sent back to the server.Communication between the server and the client will be provided using OGC WFS.07 March 2013 47 of 44
  • 52. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 29 Editing of vector data07 March 2013 48 of 44
  • 53. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 30 Data flow between HS Layers and Geoserver.Layer hierarchy and thematic mapsThe map application enables user to create thematic map compositions using servicespublished by GeoServer or any other OGC OWS server.07 March 2013 49 of 44
  • 54. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 31 User (or administrator) can create thematic maps (map compositions) using standardOGC OWS client, part of the mapping application.The map application offers two ways how to look at the map content: • Logical view, where layers can be organized into groups and sub-groups, without impact in their physical order in the map window, and • Physical view – where user can change layer order and hierarchy.Created map compositions can be stored and recorded in metadata catalogue for later use (e.g.by another user).Figure 32 Ordering layers into groups, without touching the physical structure of displayedmaps.07 March 2013 50 of 44
  • 55. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 33 Changing the physical structure of displayed layers. In the "Physical view" tab, layerscannot be structured into groups, but their position in the layer tree (using drag&drop) can bechanged.METADATA EXTRACTORMetadata extractor is a tool to extract available metadata directly from different files(documents, presentation, etc.), edit this metadata and publish metadata and files on an URMportal. It can also extract metadata (and then edit) directly from existing URL addresses andstore metadata on an URM portal. Access to information is then through direct URLaddresses.Currently the metadata extractor supports • publishing documents on the portal – users can select any type of file on their computer, extract and edit metadata and published this file on a portal; • publishing of links to existing Web pages only putting URL of Web pages to extractor; • or published directly new Web pages stored in Zip file. These Web pages are directly accessible through an URM portal.07 March 2013 51 of 44
  • 56. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 34 Metadata extractorNetworking Services and InvokingThe HABITATS Reference Laboratory currently has two types of networking services: • Catalogue services • View servicesCATALOGUE SERVICESThe Catalogue client allows searching through connected metadata catalogues by OGC CSWcatalogue services. Data can be searched by text or by defined elements defined in variousstandards (including OGC CSW 2.0.2, AP ISO, INSPIRE). Basic elements are datasets andservices. Basic elements can be extended by user demands but they are not searchable onother catalogues. While the initial version of catalogue services used cascading of multipleservices, the current version supports adding services independently on each other.This application interacts with a map viewer and allows map services to be added into a mapby just one click. Another interaction is with the metadata extractor. Documents or web pagesstored by the extractor can be opened also by one click. Services can be added from list ofpredefined services or can be added by direct links.07 March 2013 52 of 44
  • 57. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasTechnical description: • Written in PHP (server part), ExtJS Javascript framework (client part) • Client components (may be used separately): • Basic search form (search row) – provides basic Google-like fulltext searchFigure 35 Catalogue Search • Advanced search form – over all INSPIRE queryables. User required queryables can be added.Figure 36 Advanced search • Result list – presents a brief record list from GetRecordsResponse from catalogue. Pagination and user-defined templates with different levels of detail are supported. Clicking on the record allows the user to get detailed metadata.07 March 2013 53 of 44
  • 58. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 37 Metadata Detail • Map panel – enables interactively enter search bounding box and shows spatial extent of found metadata records.Figure 38 Metadata Spatial Exten07 March 2013 54 of 44
  • 59. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 39 Catalogue Client architectureThe Catalogue Client architecture is as shown:Its functionality includes: • Support of OGC Catalogue Service for Web (CSW) 2.0.2. • Support of csw:Record (Dublin Core) and gmd:MD_Metadata type names. • Multilingual user interface • Multilingual metadata records are displayed in actual user interface language. If not present, the main metadata record language is used. • Printing of metadata record (PDF format) • Mechanism displaying and linking coupled and aggregated resources (operatesOn for service, parent / children metadata and other types of link between metadata records). • Support for thesauri service (thesauri SKOS client) • Parallel searches across multiple CSW servers (each service may be presented in separate tab) • Adding predefined CSW or user defined • Caching results for better performance • Saving/restoring application status between page visits • Configurable integration with map viewers to display found on-line services (WMS, WFS)The catalogue client is an independent Metadata Management System that can be used forexample with GeoNetwork.Invoking of discovery servicesThe reference laboratory uses its own catalogue, but there are also possibilities to invokeanother catalogue from a remote platform into the system. There are two possibilities: • To harvest metadata into the reference laboratory. • To provide direct search of remote catalogues.For both possibilities it is necessary to register the remote catalogue in the metadata system ofthe reference laboratory. This can be done using the Import functionality of the remotecatalogue services.07 March 2013 55 of 44
  • 60. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 40 Catalogue ImportAfter registration of these services, this catalogue could be used for harvesting or multi-searching on the side of the Reference Laboratory discovery services.Figure 41 Catalogue importExperiences with sharing of metadata in INSPIRE and GEOSS and SuperCatalogue implementationCATALOGUES INTEROPERABITY PROBLEMSDuring our testing of different “INSPIRE and GEOSS catalogues „we detected theseproblems in some implementations: 1. Not functioning catalogue (catalogue moved to another address, temporarily unavailable, password protected). 2. Catalogue does not implement properly CSW 2.0.2 (older version, errors etc…) or it is based on another standard 3. In current version of CSW 2.0.2 specification many things are unclear or missing so vendors implement them different way (e.g. harvesting of catalogues, behaviour of different typenames, queryables etc. )07 March 2013 56 of 44
  • 61. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 4. CSW should support Dublin core (csw:Record), but other profiles are optional. There are implementations of ebRIM, ISO, FGDC and other. For INSPIRE ISO AP 1.0 is mandatory, but not all catalogues support it. 5. Protocols: CSW should support GET, POST and optionally SOAP protocol, for most implementations POST AND SOAP are used. Not all catalogues implements these protocols for GetRecord as well as GetRecordById operations. 6. Query languages. CQL and OGC Filter should be supported. Some catalogues has errors in implementation or does not support full language properties. 7. Queryables. There are mandatory set of queryables but INSPIRE requires additional queryables. Not all catalogues implements the INSPIRE queryables, we register some problems (response times, empty set of results) with some queries.Idea of Super Catalogue - SuperCATThere are many OGC web services available worldwide which may be widely use in differentscale of applications. But if the SDI or other applications should be operable, it is crucial tohave the services available and reliable all the time. In real life many problems have revealedregarding services access and operability: 1. Not all services have public metadata record to be found with. They are not catalogued. 2. If the services are registered on catalogues where may be accessed (e.g. OGC CSW, on portals etc.). Because of using “deep web” methods, occasional users are not able to simply search these resources by common search engines like Google or Bing. So the metadata are available only for users, who know the catalogue address or address of portal offering the human interface to catalogue. 3. Topicality of single catalogues. Many metadata records are not up to date and links to services are not valid in many cases. Sometimes the provided ULR links to web page or viewer rather than service connect point. 4. Some catalogues don’t respond. (The same problem like other services) 5. Services metadata are catalogued many ways, because there are no common “global” rules how to uniquely code some element e.g. serviceType and other elements. The query results may not give clean results. 6. If the services are running, the service metadata are very often quite poor, especially layers metadata URL are not available.CENTRAL CATALOGUE IMPLEMENTATIONTo provide our users clean access to running services, we attempted to build services metadatarepository on our server. • The catalogue is CSW 2.0.2 ISO AP 1.0 compliant (MICKA) • Supports INSPIRE metadata profile and queryables • Enables to register remote catalogues and harvest them periodically (Figure 1) • Enables to harvest other services (WMS, WFS, WCS, CSW) and individual metadata files • Enables monitoring registered services if they are running properly (Figure 2, 3)Processing: • These metadata catalogues were registered to catalogue for harvesting in first phase:07 March 2013 57 of 44
  • 62. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o ISPIRE national nodes: Austria, Belgium, Czech republic, Finland, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, United Kingdom o CIDP o EEA SDI o ENVIROGRIDS o EuroGEOSS o GEOSS o HABITATS o One Geology Europe o Plan4all o WHO • The resources are harvested daily with filter to services only (type=service) • Harvest protocol is generated for checking the availability of the catalogues. Mail notifications are sent to corresponding users to ensure feedback. • Test of availability is performed for all services daily (only WMS at this phase). It the service is not running, the corresponding metadata record is not deleted but only hidden for the case the service is temporarily not available. So next day the record may be set to public if the service is alive again.Figure 42 SuperCat harvesting07 March 2013 58 of 44
  • 63. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 43 Micka harvesting configuration07 March 2013 59 of 44
  • 64. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 44 RSS channel – harvesting resultsFigure 45 Heartbeat protocol07 March 2013 60 of 44
  • 65. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasTESTING RESULTS2222 services were harvested from registered catalogues. WMS services were analyseddetailed (see table 1). The 87% responding services is quite good result.Table 1Service type code count Responding Responding (%) (count)WMS 96 88 92OGC:WMS 1418 1351 95View 343 190 55View 1 1 100VIEW 2 2 100View Service 73 73 100Together 1860 1632 87Table 1 Testing WMS services resultsBut we met these problems: 1. serviceType is ambiguous in many cases (see table 1). INSPIRE directive brings more confusion into service classification. 2. There is no thematic classification for services and metadata are poor in general. Then the catalogue queries are not efficient. (At least INSPIRE theme keywords or other commonly used code list would be good step to introduce some thematic classification) 3. Unique service URL is not stated. INSPIRE says, it would be Capabilities document URL (e.g. distributionInfo/*/transferOptions/*/onLine/*/linkage= ¡Error! Referencia de hipervínculo no válida.), but it is coded in different way (only service connect point in most cases and additionally distributionInfo/*/transferOptions/*/onLine/*/protocol=OGC:WMS-1.1.1-http-get- capabilities, but it varies from service to service)PRACTICAL RESULTSCentral catalogue enables smooth access to dozens of services on one portal. We also providemobile solution, where the SDI may be simple accessed from mobile devices.07 March 2013 61 of 44
  • 66. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 46 Portal – metadata catalogue clientFigure 47 Mobile catalogue client07 March 2013 62 of 44
  • 67. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 48 Mobile catalogue client connected to central catalogue and map viewer showing foundWMSPLANS FOR FUTURE • More detailed services checking (now only capabilities document is tested) • More catalogues and services will be harvested • WFS, KML and WCS metadata will be processed • Provide web interface to be searched by commonly used search engines (Google …)View ServicesHSLayers is yet another OpenLayers & ExtJS based mapping framework. Its development hasbeen started in 2007 and is still provided mainly by Help Service - Remote Sensing. HSLayersis released under GNU/GPL. Currently, 3.0 development branch is the actual.Figure 49 Illustration of relation between ExtJS and OpenLayers libraries inside of HSLayers.OpenLayers are used for their capabilities of geodata visualization, such as raster maps (JPEG,07 March 2013 63 of 44
  • 68. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasPNG, ...), web services (OGC WMS, OGC WFS, ...), various vector formats (KML, GML,GeoRSS, ...), proprietary formats (Google maps, OpenStreetMap, ...), working withprojections and great user experience with the map.ExtJS was used because of its well design and source code structure, which enables to createvarious elements of UI (panels, tree structures, grids, forms), in a very simple and fast way.HSLayers are designed as set of basic stones and components, which can be put together andcustom application can be build. There are provides such top all-including class, whichincorporates nearly all features of HSLayers: MapPortal.Figure 50 HSlayers Map PortalThe HSLayers18 set of tools is used in new generations of map applications, and includes: • HSLayers Components • HSLayers Portal • Server scripts (Transformation, Print) • Editing with HSLayers • Special HSLayers.Layer.MapServer typeFrom a developer’s point of view, HSLayers/OpenLayers is a pure JavaScript library fordisplaying map data in most modern web browsers, with no server-side dependencies.OpenLayers implements an object-oriented JavaScript API for building rich web-basedgeographic applications, similar to the Google Maps and MSN Virtual Earth APIs.OpenLayers can display various types of raster and vector data formats. It inherently supportsOGC WMS specification, as well as common Image formats (in PNG, GIF or JPEG format).There is also support for multiple proprietary formats, such as Google Maps, Yahoo maps and18 http://redmine.ccss.cz/projects/hslayers, see alsohttp://gis.vsb.cz/GIS_Ostrava/GIS_Ova_2010/sbornik/Lists/Papers/EN_2_11.pdf07 March 2013 64 of 44
  • 69. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasothers. OpenLayers uses tiling of raster data. A numbers of vector (and text) data formats arealso supported. The system allows the rendering of vector features in GML, OGC WFS,GeoRSS, KML formats. Creation of regular shapes (boxes, circles, ...) is also supported.Points can be displayed as special point features with image icon or vector point features.Many controls are available to support map interactivity and customization. Among others,these include: zoom bar, overview map, layer switcher, various toolbars and mouse actionhandlers can be used. Thanks to its advanced event model, custom map control can also bereadily programmed. (Cepicky et al. 2008). So it is an ideal platform for the HABITATS RLto support all of the possible Network Service requirements of the pilots.HSLayers features are coming up from OpenLayers and therefore their characteristics are asfollows: • Portrayal of various types of data: o Raster: OGC WMS(-T), Image (PNG, JPEG, GIF), … o Vector: OGC WFS(-T), GML, GeoRSS, KML, GPX, GeoJSON, … o Data sources from commercial servers: Google Maps, Virtual Earth, Yahoo Maps, …MapFigure 51 Map Window07 March 2013 65 of 44
  • 70. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasHSLayers.MapPanel is container for the map. The map usually interacts with the user throughmouse gestures, so it zooms in/out, pans etc. There usually is graphical tool for setting thedesired region - bar for panning and zooming. Several other tools, which do enable theinteraction with the map are available too, namely zoom history, measuring of lines and areas,tool for querying the layers and other custom tools. Tools for working with the map content,such as saving/restoring web map content (WMC) files, printing the map content orgenerating the permanent link for current map state are available too.MapPanel contains various map layers, it enables to the user to work with the map (zooming,panning, ...). Zoom bar together with overview map are available.Tools for direct interaction with the map are available too, such as navigation, navigationhistory, measuring, querying and others.The top toolbar and bottom toolbar are used for other informative tools, or tools for workingmore with the map content, than in the map itself. We can see buttons for saving and restoringOGC WMC files, printing, permanent link generator, scale, mouse position and copyrightinformation.Layer SwitcherWith LayerSwitcher, user can change visibility of available layers, change their order in thelayer stack, set transparency and other features and use shortcut links to layer metadata orremove them from the map.LayerSwitcher is one of the most complex components of HSLayers. We do introduce twodifferent views at the layer stack: the physical structure and the logical structure.Figure 52 Physical and Logical Structure07 March 2013 66 of 44
  • 71. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasLOGICAL STRUCTURERepresents the view on the application, where layers are organized into groups (or folders)according to some user-defined logic. Layers can be sorted into folders according to theiroriginal service, or based on their contentPhysical structure corresponds with the layer stack, how it is displayed in the map. User canchange layer order (using drag & drop) etc.LayerSwitcher is able to display also legend to all layers, perform user searches in the layerstack, display basic information and settings in the layer menu (such as abstract, scale range,title, ...). User can move the layer, drop the layer or change layer’s name.There is also basic work done, on WFS filtering, SLD defining, transparency settings etc.User can use several shortcut links to layer’s metadata, copyright information and others.The Layerswitcher also uses 3-state checkbox. Every folder checkbox has three states - on (alllayers within the folder are visible), off (everything is invisible) and custom.OWSHSLayers contains complex OGC OWS client, which is capable to work with OGC WMSdata directly, with OGC WFS and OGC WCS via server-side script Proxy4ows.HSLayers contain mechanism, how to read parameters from URL directly, so the applicationcan start with OWS Client opened and Capabilities document parsed.07 March 2013 67 of 44
  • 72. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 53 HSLayers.OWS - Open Web Services clientWorking with OWS Client is straight forward - user gives the URL, where the service isrunning and type of the service (usually OWS). After capabilities are loaded, form withservice parameters is displayed (image format, query format, etc.) together with layer tree,where several layers can be checked. Service metadata (service provider, abstract, title, etc.)are displayed in separate tab.After that, layers can be added into map. When user wants to display some on-line availablefiles, such as GeoRSS, GML, KML or similar, she just need to specify the URL and fileformat. After that, user is requested for the layer name and it is added to the map as well.Printing with HSLayersHSLayers includes printing setup, so that content of the map can be printed at any printer orused in other desktop GIS workstation. The printing client enables the user, to choose betweenprinting a map to a pre-defined template (PDF or HTML output) or saving the content of themap into a raster image (image output).When the user makes a choice, that he wants to create a raster image with the map’s currentcontent, he can either directly click the button, and a copy of the map window will be07 March 2013 68 of 44
  • 73. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasdisplayed, according to the selected image format (which can be one of PNG, JPEG, GIF andgeo-referenced GeoTIFF). The desired scale and region can be set as well. When a userchooses to print a map to a pre-defined template, a new box is drawn, representing the paperbox.Users can move the paper over the map and define the desired region. The size of the paperbox is always adjusted according to the selected scale. Additional information can be added aswell (map title, description, icon). The map is then layouted according to selected pre-definedtemplate to PDF or HTML output. The template is prepared as a HTML page. Printing isprovided by a server script, which is able to work with standard WMS services, tiled-layer,vector data and other inputs. The paper is dependent on prepared templates - it can be virtuallyanything from A5 to A0.Figure 54 Printing with HSLayersPrinting form. The orange square represents the paper. User can move the paper on the mapand define the printing area. In this case, HTML output page will be generated, according toselected template.For the printing, server component is used, which uses MapServer mapscript for preparing themapfile according to displayed map layers (raster, service or vector) and layouts the map inthe desired form (PDF according to template or simple image). Output templates are HTML-based, and they are converted from HTML to PDF using webkit renderer.07 March 2013 69 of 44
  • 74. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 55 Printing ResultPrinting result - based on given HTML template with several additional keywords (easy tosetup for everybody), user will get PDF output with title, map, legend and overview maprendered.Web Map ContextThe important new issue is the support for Web Map Context (WMC). Web Map Context(WMC) describes how to save a map view comprised of many different layers from differentWeb Map Servers. A ‘context’ can be encoded and saved so that Web maps created by userscan be automatically reconstructed and augmented by the authoring user or by other users inthe future. A Context document is structured using eXtensible Markup Language (XML).Potential uses for context include creating default initial views for Web maps for differenthazards, saving the state of a user’s work on a viewer client to preserve information such ashow geospatial layers are added or modified, and saving the state of a client session forsharing with other users. This mechanism is valuable for efficiently communicating acrossshift transitions. Also, context documents can be catalogued and discovered for reuse byothers • Define WMC on the base current composition on portal • Save composition on local disk • Save composition with metadata on server07 March 2013 70 of 44
  • 75. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Open composition from local disk • Open composition from server • Open composition from remote servers using metadata descriptionThe implementation of the WMC concept presents a new way to the future upcomingsolution, when the system will support easier collaboration and sharing of results. It alsosupports the reuse of results of work done on portal by other applications.07 March 2013 71 of 44
  • 76. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 56 Web Map Content EditingThis figure represents the basic configuration of form, which will save (to local drive, notupload to some server-service) WMC file, containing information about current mapcomposition.OGC WMC is rather old standard, which does not support all possible types of layers, which07 March 2013 72 of 44
  • 77. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituascan be displayed in HSLayers. On the other hand, it is only one standardized format. Forsaving map content more precisely, we’ve developed custom JSON format, which is usedamong others in Permalink.The main disadvantage of WMC is, that is is able to store WMS and WFS layers only, whilehaving Image, WMST, Raw vector data and other layer types in the map. For storing completeweb content, including user-defined data, Permanent link can be used.Permanent linkUsers often spend hours with creating ideal map compositions, based on various web services,custom user graphics and other data sources. How to save the map content?Another issue is, how to send custom map composition, or just simple user graphics (e.g.parcel specification), zoomed into particular location?For this, permalink has been developed. Unlike permalink which is wildly used amongvarious mapping applications, we cannot store information about displayed layers into themap’s URL. For this purpose, special JSON structure with the map content is stored on theserver. The file can be also downloaded to local hard drive. Unlink OGC WMC (which issupported by HSLayers too), every layer type displayed in the map can be stored into thisstructure. User sends just the link to another user, and whole map content will bereconstructed at the other computer.Figure 57 Permanent LinkPermalink window, which is displayed after copy of current map content is saved to theserver. User can now download the JSON structure or send the link to another user.EmbeddedSome users do want to prepare their map composition and display the result in their own webpage. For this purpose HSLayers Embedded is here. It generates HTML snippet, which can beadd to any web page and after the page is re-loaded, map pops up.07 March 2013 73 of 44
  • 78. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasEmbedded uses same JSON format for saving the structure of the map content, as for examplePermalink does. All layers displayed in the map portal are transferred in to the embeddedmap.This particular component needs little PHP-based script, which generates the desired form ofembedded map. Pure HTML, Simple ExtJS and Advanced ExtJS output are supported, basedon the complexity, the user wants to have the resulting map.Figure 58 EmbeddedForm, which generates HTML code, which can be later used in user’s web page.Querying displayed layersHSLayers.Control.Query is tool, which enables to the user to point with mouse in the map atsome place and perform spatial query. Following layer types are queryable: • OGC WMS with capability to display information in text, html, GML or other format • Vector layer of any type, such as KML • Proprietary MapServer layer (not only point, but also box query is allowed).It works in very straight-forward way. User does not need to take care about layer query typeor server output format. HSLayers tries to display result of the query in a grid form, ifpossible. All visible layers are queried automatically. Along with query result, mouse positionis displayed as well, so that user can copy and re-use it.07 March 2013 74 of 44
  • 79. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 59 Result of the point query on one vector layer.User graphics and measuringHSLayers do offer possibility of measurement of lengths and areas. Unlike most othersystems, HSLayers do enable to the user to measure several objects at once - not only one linecan be drawn, but many. User can also combine lines with areas.HSLayers extended the measuring function into the user graphics concept. User can drawany geometry feature, set its attributes. Along this, areas are lengths are calculated andcontinually recalculated. Use can draw new graphics, delete existing once, set attributes(simple or complex). Resulting graphics can be printed or used in Permalink or Embeddedmap.Figure 60 User graphicSeveral geometries with their dimensions drawn in user graphics layer.07 March 2013 75 of 44
  • 80. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasOGC Web Processing Service clientHSLayers contains first version of generic OGC WPS client. Client is able to parseGetCapabilites response, generate form for input data on-the-fly and submit the Executerequest. User can at the end download the resulting data. Since the standard is very vague insome cases, and server-side implementations are changing a lot in the time, it is alwaysnecessary to test the client against particular server and eventually fix some issues. Whendealing with ComplexInput data, HSLayers WPS client is able to send any type of Vectorlayer displayed in the map, as well as send direct link of WFS GetFeatures or WCSGetCoverage request. User can also draw custom graphics and send the data to the server, tobe analysed. When data are returned back, user can either add them to the map, or downloadthem directly.Figure 61 OGC WPS clientGeneric WPS Client with on-the-fly generated form for data inputs for the Buffer process.07 March 2013 76 of 44
  • 81. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas.Figure 62 Image classifcationSimple presentation of OGC WPS - satelite image classification.Figure 63 BufferingComplex presentation of OGC WPS client as well as functionality of Proxy4OWSServer-side scriptsAlthough HSLayers can be considered as pure JavaScript library, it is designed to work withseveral server-side components (scripts), which are enabling more advanced features, such as • warping script for on-the-fly raster data projection • printing script for creating hard-copy maps07 March 2013 77 of 44
  • 82. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • ability to work with OGC WCS and WFS services • session management • OGC WMC handlingHSPROXYHSProxy is Python script, which enables calls from the map application to various remoteservers, for example to WMS server, which is (for security reasons) not possible to dodirectly. For this purpose, little server-side proxy script needs to be setup, which performs thisremote-call operations.HSproxy deals as proxy for Ajax calls from JavaScript to various remote servers (used forQuery, WMS, ...). It also converts mimetypes headers of coming XMLs, to text/xml, so thatbrowsers can read it and parse them easy. Often it is the case, that for examples WMSCapabilities document, which is returned by the server has different header, which is notrecognized by the web browser as simple XML file, and parsing is than very difficult.Converts coming files from various encodings to UTF-8, to make sure, every response fromthe server, using various encodings, is displayed correctly in the map.StatusManager server scriptStatus Manager is PHP script, which • Reads and writes state of the map (using PHP Session id and JSON format with description of the map content), so that user, while page reloading, gets the state, she got before leaving. • Is used as server-side file-handler. Often we need some data, to be offered to the user as file for downloading. Or user sends file, and we need to get its content. This simple script enables this javascript <–> file object connection.When user needs to upload an image or for example GeoRSS file, which needs to bedisplayed by the map, certain server-side interaction (but very small one) is needed.StatusManager is helping us to provide such interaction.PROXY4OWSIn the web environment, we are are often facing a problem, how to display data, which are notsuited for direct visualization (for example large GeoTIFF files). Proxy4OWS tries toovercome this problem. It generates OGC WMS service from OGC WCS, WFS or even fromanother WMS on-the-fly. This generated WMS can be then consumed by any WMS clienteasy.Reason for this is, wen so display large vector data (produced by WFS servers), large rasterGeoTIFFs (produced by WCS servers) and data, services, which coordinate reference systemdoes not correspond with client’s coordinate reference system (in case of some WMS servers).07 March 2013 78 of 44
  • 83. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasIt is written in python, using standard MapServer and GDAL components.Figure 64 Sequence diagram of proxy4ows shows the negotiation between the client, proxy4owsmiddleware and the target server.Invoking with HSlayersINVOKING OF VIEW (WMS) SERVICESThe WMS services can be invoked into the visualisation client in two ways: The first is todiscover WMS services from catalogues and visualise WMS services directly fromcatalogues.Figure 65 Invoking from catalogueThe second possibility is to add the WMS URL directly to the visualisation client HSlayers.The URL could be added using OWS services.07 March 2013 79 of 44
  • 84. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 66 WMS invoking WMS COORDINATE TRANSFORMATIONIn the real-life, we are often facing a problem, how to display map from the server, whichdoes not support coordinate system of the displayed map. This is implemented with help ofProxy4OWS (described later in this document). It is assumed, that Capabilities document isalready parsed, it is expecting GetMap request from the client to Proxy4OWS directly. TheGetMap request is expected to have - next to original WMS parameters - also three add-onoptions: - owsService - this is going to be WMS - owsUrl - URL of the original service, which is expecting to handle the GetMap request - fromCRS - CRS of the original coordinate system, from which shall the result of GetMap be transformed to.Proxy4OWS generates MapServers mapfile on-the-fly. Only one layer is attached to themapfile - layer of type WMS. MapServer then formulates the necessary request, fetches thedata from remote server and provides image transformation on them. Result is always little bitdistorted, because the resolution is not always fine enough, but the it can be used anddisplayed in the mapping application.07 March 2013 80 of 44
  • 85. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Figure 67 WMS Sequence diagram.Figure 68 WMS transformation result - left map coordinate system, right - transformed resultfrom EPSG:4326 source.07 March 2013 81 of 44
  • 86. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThanks to Proxy4OWS, we can now display seam-less data from several WMS resources,which do not support coordinate system of the map, displayed in users browser.INVOKING OF MAP COMPOSITIONS – WEB MAP CONTEXTThe important new issue is the support for Web Map Context (WMC). Web Map Context(WMC) describes how to save a map view comprised of many different layers from differentWeb Map Servers. A context can be encoded and saved so that Web maps created by userscan be automatically reconstructed and augmented by the authoring user or by other users inthe future. A Context document is structured using eXtensible Markup Language (XML).Potential uses for context include creating default initial views for Web maps for differenthazards, saving the state of a users work on a viewer client to preserve information such ashow geospatial layers are added or modified, and saving the state of a client session forsharing with other users. This mechanism is valuable for efficiently communicating acrossshift transitions. Also, context documents can be catalogued and discovered for reuse byothers; this allows analysts to benefit from lessons learned in previous episodes. 19In URM there is now implemented strong support for discovery and defining new WMCbased on information displayed on portal. The system allows to: • Define WMC on the base current composition on portalFigure 69 Composition Saving • Save composition on local disk • Save composition with metadata on server • Open composition from local disk19 http://www.eu-orchestra.org/TUs/Standards/en/html/Unit4_learningObject6.html07 March 2013 82 of 44
  • 87. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Figure70 Open Composition from local disk • Open composition from server • Open composition from remote servers using metadata descriptionThe implementation of the WMC concept presents a new way to the future upcomingsolution, when the system will support easier collaboration and sharing of results. It alsosupports the reuse of results of work done on portal by other applications.INVOKING OF WFS AND WCSFor the invoking of WFS and WCS for visualisation proxy4ows is used. When working withlarge vector datasets, we are usually facing limits of current browsers. Google Maps 1 forexample has limited the number of displaying vector features to 1000. In OpenLayers 2, thereis no limit for the number of features used, but displaying e.g. cadastral map makes browsersoften freeze. An advantage of working with vector data directly is (among others), the directpossibility of editing vector data, a more interactive way of user experience and speed (whendealing with reasonable amounts of data).While vector data can be displayed using current technologies, some popular raster dataformats, such as GeoTIFF, cannot be. According to W3C , only few formats for raster data aresupported, none of them is really used or usable in GIS, usually because of the compressionmethod they are using. In the internet, raster graphics format focus on possibly low amount ofdata transferred from the server to the client, while losing the accuracy of the data beingtransferred. In GIS, we are focusing on data quality, regardless of file size.Raster and vector data are usually distributed using OGC OWS standards. Vector and rasterdata are distributed via OGC Web Feature and Raster Service respectively. Both services areoffering lists of datasets and metadata.Another problem might occur, when some OGC Web Mapping Service does not offer acoordinate reference system, in which the web mapping application is configured. Somemiddle-ware has to be established between the map application and the server, which willtransform the images from server coordinate reference system to the one accepted by theclient.Proxy4ows is a server script, which is between the client mapping application and OGC OWSserver (WCS, WFS or WMS). It is transforming OGC WMS request types from the client,into WCS or WFS requests, so that the target server can accept them. On the way back, itdownloads the data distributed by the server (raster or vector), creates image and sends it backto the client.It also transforms the GetCapabilities request-response pair, so that the (WMS) client can dealwith it.As result, data is processed on the server, into the form, common web browser mappingapplication are able to display without big demands on system resources.07 March 2013 83 of 44
  • 88. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 71 WFS invoking schemeHSlayers.Layer.WCS and WFS are derived from Layer WMS. As proxy between the client(the map) and the WFS|WCS server, OWSProxy is placed. OWSProxy transforms WMSrequests coming from the client into WFS|WCS calls and also responses are transformed toWMS responses or images, displayable in the web browser.Proxy4ows can also deal with OGC WMS service in the way, that it transforms the coordinatereference system of the original service into the client-preferred one in the case the serverdoes not support the coordinate system of the client. The resulting image is usually slightlydistorted, but displayable.Proxy4ows is written in the Python programming language. The following libraries are used:MapServer 4: MapServer is the core of Proxy4ows. Proxy4ows generates the Map object configuration and after that dispatch method of MapServer is used, which deals with the request, downloads all necessary data from servers and generates the resulting image. From the client-point of view, it is used for working directly with vector data (deals as OGC WFS client).GDAL/OGR 5 GDAL is used for reading OGC WFS and OGC WCS service metadata, so that the WMS response from Proxy4ows to the client, has all of the necessary information. While for OGC WFS service, MapServer is directly acting as a client, OGC WCS is configured as GDAL data source. Also for WMS transformation service, WMS interface of GDAL is used, as it is able to deal with tiled requests, preserving the large dataset exceptions issue.OWSLib 6 OWSLib is Python library, which acts as OWS client. With the help of OWSLib, metadata of particular target services are being collected easily. Once again: Proxy4ows acts as WMS server to the client and acts as WFS, WCS or even WMS client to the target server.GetCapabilities When a GetCapabilities request arrives from the client, Proxy4ows checks for an existing cached directory with mapfile, or creates a new one, if it doesn’t exist.4 http://mapserver.org5 http://gdal.org6 http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/owslib/wiki07 March 2013 84 of 44
  • 89. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasGetMap When a GetMap request arrives, an image is generated based on the previously generated mapfile, using OWSDispatch method. At this point, a WFS filter is applied, if the target server is WFS.In both cases, Proxy4ows is looking for existing MapServer MapFile (it creates one, if it doesnot exist) and lets MapServer do the work. Proxy4ows takes care of the proper MapFileconfiguration.Figure 72 Get Map SchemeWhen a WMS GetCapabilities request arrives, OWSProxy generates a MapFile with list oflayers, corresponding to either feature types (WFS) or coverages (WCS) of the target service.For configuring the MapFile properly, GDAL, OGR and OWSLib libraries are used.WFS Layers are configured, using MapServer as WFS Client, while WCS layers are usingGDAL as WCS Client.Then MapFile is generated, OWSDispatch method is called and the Capabilities responsearrives.07 March 2013 85 of 44
  • 90. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 73 OWS DispatchWhen the WMS GetMap request arrives, OWSProxy finds the existing MapFile (creates itanew, if it does not exist) and performs OWSDispatch function of MapServer, whichgenerates the output image and sends it back to the server.InvocationProxy4ows was originally designed as a WMS server. But it can also be used as WFS or WCSserver, so that it can only transform original data into a coordinate system unsupported by thetarget server. Therefore, the client can use basically any type of OWS request using properparameters. In addition to this, two more parameters will have to be appended to the requestURL: • owsservice notes the target server service type (WCS, WFS or WMS) • owsurl is the URL of original serverFILTER ENCODING FILTERING WFS LAYERSFilter Encoding is an Open Geospatial Consortium standard20 defining the syntax ofexpressions used to filter data provided by the geospatial web services. It describes a richpredicate language that enables to filter data based on their IDs, type-specific properties,geospatial properties, and to combine filters using logical expressions, call server-definedfunctions, encode arithmetical expressions and more.Filter Encoding is defined in XML. Often it is referred to as FE or FES, with S standing forStandard or Specification. FE Examples:21Simple comparison filter can look like that:02 http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/filter12 All the examples in here are using FES 1.1.0, unless specified otherwise07 March 2013 86 of 44
  • 91. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas <Filter> <PropertyIsLessThan> <PropertyName>DEPTH</PropertyName> <Literal>20</Literal> </PropertyIsLessThan> </Filter>Example 1.Spatial filter can, among other things, define a polygon that the desired features shouldoverlap: <Filter> <Overlaps> <PropertyName>Geometry</PropertyName> <gml:Polygon srsName="http://www.opengis.net/gml/srs/epsg.xml#63266405"> <gml:outerBoundaryIs> <gml:LinearRing> <gml:posList> ... </gml:posList> </gml:LinearRing> </gml:outerBoundaryIs> </gml:Polygon> </Overlaps> </Filter>Example 2.Logical filter allows to combine filters: <Filter> <And> <PropertyIsLessThan> ... </PropertyIsLessThan> <Overlaps> ... </Overlaps> </And> </Filter>Example 3.More examples can be found in the Filter Encoding standard. FILTER ENCODING AND WFSFilter Encoding was originally designed as part of the Web Feature Service standard, but thenit was separated into a standalone document as it can serve also for filtering of other services,such as Web Coverage Service, Gazetteer or Web Registries .When filtering data is provided by Web Feature Service, several WFS operations are involved:GetCapabilitiesAs a part of GetCapabilities response, Filter_Capabilities of the server are announced. This07 March 2013 87 of 44
  • 92. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituassection specifies the filter capabilities of the particular server. It can look as follows: <ogc:Filter_Capabilities> <ogc:Spatial_Capabilities> <ogc:GeometryOperands> <ogc:GeometryOperand>gml:Point</ogc:GeometryOperand> <ogc:GeometryOperand>gml:LineString</ogc:GeometryOperand> <ogc:GeometryOperand>gml:Polygon</ogc:GeometryOperand> <ogc:GeometryOperand>gml:Envelope</ogc:GeometryOperand> </ogc:GeometryOperands> <ogc:SpatialOperators> <ogc:SpatialOperator name="BBOX"/> <ogc:SpatialOperator name="Equals"/> <ogc:SpatialOperator name="Disjoint"/> <ogc:SpatialOperator name="Intersect"/> </ogc:SpatialOperators> </ogc:Spatial_Capabilities> <ogc:Scalar_Capabilities> <ogc:LogicalOperators/> <ogc:ComparisonOperators> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>LessThan</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>GreaterThan</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>LessThanEqualTo</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>GreaterThanEqualTo</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>EqualTo</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>NotEqualTo</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>Like</ogc:ComparisonOperator> <ogc:ComparisonOperator>Between</ogc:ComparisonOperator> </ogc:ComparisonOperators> <ogc:ArithmeticOperators> <ogc:SimpleArithmetic/> <ogc:Functions> <ogc:FunctionNames> <ogc:FunctionName nArgs="1">SIN</ogc:FunctionName> <ogc:FunctionName nArgs="1">COS</ogc:FunctionName> <ogc:FunctionName nArgs="1">TAN</ogc:FunctionName> </ogc:FunctionNames> </ogc:Functions> </ogc:ArithmeticOperators> </ogc:Scalar_Capabilities> <ogc:Id_Capabilities> <ogc:EID/> <ogc:FID/> </ogc:Id_Capabilities> </ogc:Filter_Capabilities>Example 4.DescribeFeatureTypeProperties that can be used to filter features of a specific type are advertised in the response tothe DescribeFeatureType request. In the example below, four properties can be used to filter07 March 2013 88 of 44
  • 93. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasthe features of the type location: DEPTH, SURFACE, AREA and CODE. <complexType name="locationType"> <complexContent> <extension base="gml:AbstractFeatureType"> <sequence> <element name="msGeometry" type="gml:SurfacePropertyType" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1"/> <element name="DEPTH" type="Integer"/> <element name="SURFACE" type="Character"/> <element name="AREA" type="Real"/> <element name="CODE" type="Character"/> </sequence> </extension></complexContent></complexType>Example 5.GetFeatureWhen the filter capabilities of the server are known as well as the properties of the particularfeature type, the filter can be created following the FE standard. Consider the filter fromExample 1, this time extended with the namespaces. It selects all the features whose DEPTHproperty is less than 20. To the GetFeature request the FILTER parameter is added and thefilter is provided as the value:http://localhost/cgi-bin/ows?REQUEST=GetFeature&VERSION=1.1.0&SERVICE=WFS&TYPENAME=location&FILTER=<ogc:Filterxmlns:ogc="http://www.opengis.net/ogc"><ogc:PropertyIsLessThan><ogc:PropertyName>DEPTH</ogc:PropertyName><ogc:Literal>20</ogc:Literal></ogc:PropertyIsLessThan></ogc:Filter>Example 6.In the HABITATS Geoportal, Filter Encoding is used to filter WFS layers. To do it, first add aWFS layer to your map. Then right-click on the layer name in the Layer Switcher and selectFilter:07 March 2013 89 of 44
  • 94. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 74 Geoportal, Filter EncodingThe filter window appears with a form for simple comparison filter. From the first drop-downlist select a property that will be used for filtering (these have been parsed out from theDescribeFeatureType response). From the second drop-down list select the operator that willbe used. (The list of available operators has been parsed out from the GetCapabilitiesresponse.) In the text field the value to compare it with is entered. Click Apply and the layerwill be filtered.07 March 2013 90 of 44
  • 95. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 75 Filter EncodingImplementation of the Filter Encoding is shown on the following illustration:Figure 76 Filtering of WFSThe processing works as follows:WFS layers are displayed as WMS in the HSLayers Web Client (see Proxy4ows for details).1. WFS GetCapabilities request is sent directly to the WFS server. Capabilities document isparsed and filter capabilities are saved.2. WFS DescribeFeatureTypes request is sent directly to the WFS server. Reply is parsed andproperties of the feature type are saved.3. User creates the filter in the GUI, saved information from steps 1-2. is used.07 March 2013 91 of 44
  • 96. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas4. User-created filter is written to FES and new WMS request is sent to Proxy4ows,accompanied with the filter in an additional parameter.5. Proxy4ows takes the filter, creates new WFS request involving the filter, and sends it to theWFS server. Server replies with filtered layer.6. Proxy4ows transforms the returned WFS layer to WMS and sends it to the client.WPS INVOKINGIn HSLayers, a new class WPSClient was introduced. The class implements generic OGCWPS client with graphical user interface. HSLayers WPSClient performes GetCapabilitiesrequest on the server and creates a list of available processes. Processes are rendered into adrop-down menu. When a user chooses the process he wants to run, DescribeProcess is called.Based on ProcessDescription response, a generic input form is generated. After all input datais specified, and when users click the button, an Execute request is called, and when it isfinished, an execute response is parsed and outputs of the form are filled.Complex input and BoundingBox input are relatively easy to be implemented. Writing thecomplex data handler in the web environment is a real challenge. Generic HSLayers WPSClient. Form is generated automatically.Figure 77 WPS InvokingFirst, input is identified as raster or vector. Then, the map layers are scanned andHSLayers.Layer.WCS (for rasters) HSLayers.Layer.WFS and OpenLayers. Layer.Vector (forvectors) are identified and added to the drop-down select box. The Custom URL option isattached, for custom raster or data link pasting (e.g. for direct WFS or WCS request) and, ifthe input data shall be vectors, also Custom drawings option is added, so that the user candefine some geometry on the map by hand.When an Execute request is called, HSLayers collects URLs for HSLayers.Layer.WFS orHSLayers.Layer.WCS with GetFeature or GetCoverage request types – the client is notsending the data, but only reference to the data (which is possible according to OGC WPS).HSLayers.Layer.WFS and HSLayers.Layer.WCS are special types of layers, used inHSLayers. They are based on OpenLayers.Layer.WMS class, but they are not working withWCS or WFS server directly, but communicating via server-side proxy called Proxy4ows07 March 2013 92 of 44
  • 97. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas22 [6] (more on other place). Proxy4ows is sitting between the client (generic web browser)and the server (WCS or WFS) and is transforming the requests and responses into a form thatcan be handled in the web environment. GeoTIFFs are transformed into PNG and JPEGs,GMLs are transformed into picture (PNG) form. Using this approach, there is virtually nolimit to the amount of features, which can be displayed in the client or any image formatissues.Figure 78 ProxyHSlayers.Layer.WCS and WFS are derived from Layer WMS. As a proxy between the client(the map) and the WFS|WCS server, Proxy4ows is placed. Proxy4ows transforms the WMSrequests coming from the client into WFS|WCS calls and also the responses are transformedto WMS responses or images, displayable in the web browser.Features in vector layers (which are handling vector data, not raster representation) aretransformed into the format, desired by the user, according to the server-supported MimeType(this is very vague estimation, see above). Usually this is GML and the data are then sent tothe server as part of the XML-encoded request.When a response arrives, HSLayers WPSClient does prefer reference to output data, so it canbe handled more easily (as Reference=True). When vector data are send back (usually inGML format), they are added to the map as features of OpenLayers.Layer.Vector. The GML isparsed using OpenLayers tools. Direct link for downloading is also provided. Raster data(usually GeoTIFFs) are only available for downloading.Client does not send a direct link to the original WFS or WCS server, but the link toProxy4ows. One of key features of Proxy4ows is, that it ensures the data it is providing will22 http://redmine.ccss.cz/project/owsproxy07 March 2013 93 of 44
  • 98. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasbe in the same projection as the web mapping application.Further development is moving towards a closer usage of already described Proxy4ows.Raster and Vector data will be stored on the HSLayers-server and client will consume their inweb browser usable rasterized form (PNG image).GetCapabilities and DescribeProcess are parsed directly with OpenLayers tools. For theExecute request with complex data, a reference to Proxy4ows is used. The WPS Server getsreference to Proxy4ows and not to the original server, because Proxy4ows makes sure,resulting data will have the same coordinate reference system as the map application has.As a result, HSLayers does contain a generic OGC WPS 1.0.0 version client. The client iscapable to parse capabilities, to generate automatically from based on ProcessDescriptionresponse and is able to submit Execute requests and to parse the response.It works with raster and vector data displayed in the mapping application. It is also possible tosubmit external dataset (using URL). The result can either be added to the map or can bedownloaded and storeed on the local hard drive.The displaying of output vector or raster complex data is only limited. If e.g. GeoTIFF isreturned back as a result, it can be only downloaded. Proxy4ows will be modified, so it doesaccept GeoTIFF file and produces PNG out of it.The development of the input form, based on ProcessDescription document, needs to be morerobust. Also the literal value type of data needs to be controlled according to input type(integer, string, date, ...).Even some patches based on this are already accepted in OpenLayers, a more robustWPSExecute patch will be prepared and submitted into OpenLayers code base.HSLAYERS SOS CLIENTThe SOS client in HSLayers is a component which can be used for browsing data from anyOpenGIS Sensor Observation Service (OGC SOS) compliant services. The component can beused together with map application based on HSLayers, or independently with any non mapapplication.Th actual version of component supports only operations from OGC SOS Core Profile whichmust be implemented in every OGC SOS compliant services.Operations supported in the actual version are: • GetCapabilities - returns a service description containing information about the service interface and the available sensor data • DescribeSensor - returns a description of one specific sensor, sensor system or data producing procedure • GetObservation - provides pull-based access to sensor observations and measurement- data via a spatio-temporal query that can be filtered by phenomena and value constraintsFuture versions of components will contain also operations from OGC SOS Enhanced Profileand will offer more functionality for working with data from OGC SOS services.How does it work • User invokes HSLayers SOS Client UI dialog • User inputs URL of required OGC SOS • HSLayers SOS Client sends GetCapabilities request to OGC SOS, parses its response and displays available information about OGC Service (name, abstract) in UI07 March 2013 94 of 44
  • 99. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • User selects offering and all parameters for required observations (procedure, observed property, date-time interval) • User invokes getting observations • HSLayers SOS Client sends GetObservation request with all passed parameters to OGC SOS, parses its response and display all obtained data in table and chart • If HSLayers SOS Client is used within map application based on HSLayers, user can displays location of obtained observations in mapFigure 79 HSLayers SOS clientHSLAYERS EMBED COMPONENTHSLayers contains the component Embed for inserting map into any HTML pages. User cancreate a map in a Geoportal or in any map application which is based on HSLayers and07 March 2013 95 of 44
  • 100. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituascontains the Embed component. Users can also define parameters which affect how the mapwill be look in the target HTML page.There are three types of a resulting inserted map window: • Pure HTML – this type is based on pure HTML and does not contain any other UI components • Simple ExtJS – this type uses ExtJS library for generating UI container • Advanced ExtJS – this type uses ExtJS library also as Simple ExtJS type and also contains another UI components (tree with list of all layers in map)The HSLayers Embed component consists of several parts on the client and on the server side. • Embed Generator – this part is responsible for displaying the UI form to enter the parameters affecting the resulting inserted map window. When the user enters all required parameters, the actual map is serialized and sent to the Status Manager on the server. The Status Manager is an external service which is responsible for saving actual state of any component and getting it back later. • Embed Client – this part is responsible for rendering map windows in target HTML page in dependence on parameters entered by user. • Embed Script – this part is responsible for rendering main HTML part of map window and for calling Embed Client in target HTML page.Figure 80 HSLayers EmbededGenerating HTML code 1. User invokes UI to enter the parameters of inserted map window. 2. User inputs parameters affecting map window (type of map window, size of window). 3. Embed Generator serialize actual map and send it to Status Manager. 4. Status Manager returns URL for later accessing state of actual map (when it will be rendered in target HTML page). 5. Embed Generator returns complete HTML code. User can paste this HTML code to any HTML page.07 March 2013 96 of 44
  • 101. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 81 Rendering MapRendering map window in target HTML page 1. Target HTML page renders initial JavaScript code which creates new IFRAME element. URL of this IFRAME element is set to Embed Script and contains all parameters. 2. When IFRAME is activated, the Embed Script is called. The Embed script generates the main part of HTML code for IFRAME. This HTML code contains references for all required JavaScript files and Cascade Style Sheets (CSS) files. These files are different in dependence on type of map window. 3. HTML code in IFRAME calls the Embed Client for creating the map window. 4. Then it reads the state of the map from the Status Manager and restores the complete map from this state.MOBILE SOLUTIONS FOR RLMassive mobile technologies growth during last few years brings brand new view on GIStechnologies. Location based services and spatial information comes to everyday life foreverybody. It is a big challenge for classical GIS technologies. New areas of applicationsreveals for wide community of users.The INSPIRE and mobile mapping apps infrastructure differs in many thing in philosophy,application area and technical solution. (table 2).07 March 2013 97 of 44
  • 102. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFeatures INSPIRE Existing mobile map appsFormats, Based on heavy formats (SOAP, Lite formats (JSON, KML, GeoSMS)protocols GML, WFS, WCS, CSW, …)Standardization Standardized services (OGC, ISO) Proprietary services (Google, Apple)Projections European (LAEA, LCC, …) Universal (Spherical Mercator)Users For “experts” - government, EU For “ordinary people” comissionApplication area Environment, administrative Navigation, entertainmentDifficulty Difficult to use Easy to useOpen system Open possibilities of view Bind with proprietary (licensed) maps different mapsTypical app Map portal Single purpose map app (e.g. navigation)Network traffic heavy Optimized for slow networksOn-line / off- On-line Mixed, e.g. caching tiles on devicelineUnsaid purpose European real estate market Big brother ? / advertisingTable 2 Comparison of INSPIRE solutions and current mobile solutionsThe challenge is how to connect both these worlds. INSPIRE may bring many useful data foreverybody to mobile apps (e.g. cadastral maps), on the other hand ease of use and low costsmay be challenge for experts for specialized apps, e.g. data capture and other field work. Sowe need to build some bridges for mobile apps to access INSPIRE infrastructure. On otherhands social networks and mobile apps may contribute SDI with user data (e.g. illegal dumps,water quality monitoring, …).Android “Google maps” (used in Irish pilot) application is limited for use (maps licensing,proprietary formats), so we looed for alternative which enables users to support morefunctionality.For Reference Laboratory we choose popular tourist app Locushttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=menion.android.locus.pro&feature=more_from_developer#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDEwMiwibWVuaW9uLmFuZHJvaWQubG9jdXMucHJvIl0 ). Because of primary application area, it is widespread (500 000-1 000 000 installationsworldwide) and it has very rich functionality given by log-term development based usercommunity discussion. It provides published API which enables control the application fromother apps and write own extension. We developed these extensions to enable work withINSPIRE infrastructure • Catalogue client • Cadaster info (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=cz.hsrs.parcelinfo&feature=search_result#?t=W 251bGwsMSwxLDEsImN6LmhzcnMucGFyY2VsaW5mbyJd ) • Online feature editing (not published yet)With using these tools typical work flow may look this way: 1. User opens the map and zoom to his location than presses catalogue client button 2. Catalog client opens with selected coordinates. Alternatively user may edit the coordinates and enter other search criteria 3. After pressing search button the result list is displayed07 March 2013 98 of 44
  • 103. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 4. User may see metadata detail on next screen 5. If the corresponding service is available on-line, the map button enables to go to Locus app and show it on the map. The GetFeatureInfo and GetLegendInfo operations are also supported.Figure 82 Locus map app, Catalogue client07 March 2013 99 of 44
  • 104. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 83 WMS displayed in Locus app, map legendCadastral info application is based on cadastral map WMS and WFS provided by Cadastraloffice of the Czech Republic. It enables see property information and search for cadasterparcels in the mapFigure 84 Parcel Info app07 March 2013 100 of 44
  • 105. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUsing KML as common formatThe KML is another OGC format not used in INSPIRE now. The advantage of KML overWFS is • Common use in Google Map apps (desktop and mobile) • Adoption in other software (Geoserver, Mapserver, ESRI, OpenLayers, Locus…) • Scalability, simple implementing of time series etc… • Symbology may be wrappend together with data • Using of W3C CSS rather than OGC SLD for symbologyKML may be used as common format for mobile apps rather than INSPIRE supportedformats. There are two ways how to implement it: 1. Direct support of servers as alternative to WFS/WMS (Geoserver) 2. Thru conversion modules which on-fly transform provided WFS/WMS/SLD to KMLWhen KML is available, it is compelling to register it the same way in catalogue as otherservices with services metadata. Than it may be searched and displayed simple way.Figure 85 KML metadata in the catalogue client07 March 2013 101 of 44
  • 106. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 86 Displaying KML in Google Maps and LocusField editingBig mobile apps advantage is possibility to capture field data simple way and low cost.Because lack of mobile signal coverage in some areas or no mobile internet account, severalalternatives form mobile data captures should be taken into account: • Off-line editing. Data are stored on device, posted to server when connection is available or manually at home. • On-line editing - when internet connection is available. • SMS – when no mobile internet is available and quick response is required.All of these alternatives will be probably combined depended on application in real life.07 March 2013 102 of 44
  • 107. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 87 Simple mobile editing applicationFigure 88 Filed editing results displayed online in Google Earth as KML07 March 2013 103 of 44
  • 108. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas9 Processing workflow MANAGEMENTThe objective of this chapter is to provide information about available orchestration andworkflow management tools. It also explains the tool functionalities and possibilities tointegrate and use with HABITATS services for complex chained service orchestration anddeployment.Orchestration environmentWe assume that we will use Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web ProcessingService 1.0.0. standard services provided by GeoServer WPS extension, 52north WPSsolution and byWPS as input sources in orchestration and work flow management.Another assumption is that in the future different service chaining will be able to be developedalso by non technical and IT highly skilled personnel.Workflow Management SystemWorkflow Management System (WMS) is a piece of software that provides an infrastructureto setup, execute, and monitor scientific workflows. In other words, the WMS provide anenvironment where in experiments can be defined and executed.An important function of a WMS during the workflow execution or enactment is thecoordination of operation of individual components that constitute the workflow – the processalso often referred to as orchestration.As research becomes more data-intensive and more reliant on the use of computers, largervolumes of experimentation data are recorded quicker and with greater precision. This trendhas spurred a significant increase in the complexity of scientific simulation software. Manytools only perform a small well-defined task, thus necessitating that several of them are joinedin a pipeline to model a useful experiment.Additional difficulties arise from the need to deal with the incompatible data formats thatvarious services produce or consume. It is evident that considerable amount of computerscience knowledge is required to overcome the outlined problems. However, domain scientistsacross disciplines do not have sufficient relevant expertise.Scientific workflows and WMSs have emerged to solve this problem and provide an easy-to-use way of specifying the tasks that have to be performed during a specific in silicoexperiment. The need to combine several tools into a single research analysis still holds, buttechnical details of workflow execution are now delegated to Workflow ManagementSystems.Business Process Execution LanguageBusiness Process Execution Language (BPEL), short for Web Services Business ProcessExecution Language (WS-BPEL) is an OASIS standard XML based executable language forspecifying actions within business processes with web services. Processes in Business ProcessExecution Language export and import information by using exclusively web serviceinterfaces. It defines a set of basic control structures like conditions or loops as well aselements to invoke web services and receive messages from services. BPELs messagingfacilities depend on the use of the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 1.1 todescribe outgoing and incoming messages. Message structures can be manipulated, assigningparts or the whole of them to variables that can in turn be used to send other messages.07 March 2013 104 of 44
  • 109. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasENGINES AND WORK-FLOW MANAGERSTo make tests we collected several workflow execution engines and managers. From thecollected engines the biggest part is using BPEL and only one of the solutions is oriented ondata flow execution.Apache ODE Name: Apache ODE + Eclipse Plugin Version: 1.3.5 Platform: Java Standards: WS-BPEL 2.0 Vendor: Apache Software Foundation, OASIS Licence Apache ODE: Apache Software License (ASL), version 2.0. Licence Eclipse BPEL: Incubation phase, version 0.5 Homepage: http://ode.apache.org/Apache ODE (Orchestration Director Engine) executes business processes written followingthe WS-BPEL standard. It talks to web services, sending and receiving messages, handlingdata manipulation and error recovery as described by your process definition. It supports bothlong and short living process executions to orchestrate all the services that are part of yourapplication. ODE comes with easy to use web-based management interface (Figure 1).Ode can be deployed in three different environments: As a simple Web Service in Axis 2, ODE is bundled in a WAR than can be deployed in any application server and is invoked using plain SOAP/HTTP. As a JBI service assembly, ODE is bundled in a ZIP that can be deployed in any JBI container and is invoked using the NMR. SMX4 OSGi bundleFigure 89 Apache ODEOrchestra Name: Orchestra07 March 2013 105 of 44
  • 110. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Version: 4.7.1 Platform: Java Standards: WS-BPEL 2.0 Vendor: OW2 - Object Web Licence: LGPL 2.1 Homepage: http://orchestra.ow2.org/Orchestra is a complete solution to handle long-running, service oriented processes. Itprovides out of the box orchestration functionalities to handle complex business processes. Itis based on the OASIS standard BPEL.In Orchestra server is bundled with web based workflow management Console.Figure 90 OrchestraTaverna Server Name: Taverna Server Version: 2.2a1 Platform: Java Standards: - Vendor: myGrid, OMII-UK Licence: LGPL Homepage: http://www.taverna.org.uk/Taverna Server enables you to set up a dedicated server for executing workflows remotely.07 March 2013 106 of 44
  • 111. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasServer is using workflows designed by Taverna Workbench. The Server exposes REST andSOAP APIs; either can be used to access the functionality of the Server.As demonstration manager the Taverna Demonstrator interface is used written in Rubylanguage. The demonstrator is simple GUI to manage workflow execution and can be used asinspiration for custom and more complicated workflow management solution development.(Figure 3) Taverna Demonstrator can not be used in a production environment.Figure 91 TavernaWorkflow designersAn integral part of orchestration engines and workflow managers are designers to prepareexecutable workflow documents.52°North WPS Workflow Modeller and Orchestration API • Name: 52°North WPS Workflow Modeller • Version: WPS 2.0-RC6, Revision 1647 • Platform: independent, language Java • Vendor: 52north • Licence: GPL • Homepage: http://52north.org/The open source software initiative 52°North is an international network of partners fromresearch, industry and public administration. Its mission is to foster the development of newconcepts and technologies in Geo-informatics through a common innovation process.All software developed within this collaborative development process is published under anopen source license.07 March 2013 107 of 44
  • 112. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe 52°North partners have a long and outstanding record in the Geo-IT domain. They areactively contributing to the development of international standards, e.g. at W3C, ISO, OGC orINSPIRE.The Geoprocessing community aims at designing a pluggable web service architecture fororchestrating and executing geo-processes, as well as researching innovative spatio-temporaldata analysis processing techniques.The WPS Workflow Modeller allows the visual modelling of geoprocessing workflows. In alightweight Browser environment, WPS services can be easily chained and equipped withliteral or complex data inputs from i.e. other OGC services such as WFS.This graphical WPS Workflow Modeller is based on the WPS Orchestration API which allowsthe programmatically chaining of WPS in a very straight forward manner.The work was has been conducted in cooperation with Sejong University through fundingfrom the Seoul R&BD programme (10540)The Workflow Modeller uses a standard Openlayers implementation to visualize input andresult layers (Figure 4). Along with this standard implementation comes the default controlsfor panning and zooming as well as a layer switcher to turn on/off overlay layer and to selectbase layers (see section 1.1). In the following the specific functions of the Workflow Modellerto interact with the map are described.Figure 92 Workflow modellerECLIPSE BPEL Name: Eclipse BPEL Version: WS-BPEL 2.0 Platform: independent, language Java Vendor: The Eclipse Foundation Licence: Eclipse Public License (EPL) Homepage: http://www.eclipse.org/bpel/BPEL Project adds comprehensive support to Eclipse for the definition, authoring, editing,deploying, testing and debugging of WS-BPEL 2.0 processes. WS-BPEL (Web ServicesBusiness Process Execution Language), or BPEL, is a vendor-neutral specification being07 March 2013 108 of 44
  • 113. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasdeveloped by OASIS to specify business processes as a set of interactions between webservices.The goal of the BPEL Project is to add comprehensive support to Eclipse for the definition,authoring, editing, deploying, testing and debugging of WS-BPEL 2.0 processes. WS-BPEL(Web Services Business Process Execution Language), or BPEL, is a vendor-neutralspecification being developed by OASIS to specify business processes as a set of interactionsbetween web services. By providing these tools, this project aims to build a communityaround support for BPEL in Eclipse.The implementation will be extensible to third-party vendors in a number of ways. The editorwill be extensible to support new activity types, property pages for extensibility of existingconstructs, an extensible palette, and product-specific branding capabilities. The runtimedeployment framework will be extensible so that third parties may add support for a variety ofruntime engines. The model will support extensions to provide new activities or attributes, andthe validator will allow for validation of these extensions.The Key Features are: Designer. A GEF-based editor that provides a graphical means to author BPEL processes (Figure 5). Model. An Eclipse Modelling Framework (EMF) model that represents the WS-BPEL 2.0 specification. Validation. A validator which operates on the EMF model and produces errors and warnings based on the specification. Runtime Framework. An extensible framework which will allow for deployment and execution of BPEL processes from the tools into a BPEL engine.Figure 93 Eclipse BPEL07 March 2013 109 of 44
  • 114. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasHUMBOLDT Workflow Design and Construction Service Name: HUMBOLDT Workflow Design and Construction Service Version: svn Platform: independent, language Java Short description Vendor: NATURE-SDI project Licence: Homepage: http://community.esdi-humboldt.eu/wiki/5The HUMBOLDT Workflow Design and Construction Service consists of two sub-systems, agraphical user interface, called the Workflow Editor, allowing users to compose geo-processing components into workflows. Second, a web service, called the WorkflowRepository Service, that accepts requests for workflows and delivers them to clients (inHUMBOLDT, the Mediator Service).Basic Functionality of the WDCS: Allow users to visually compose the workflow graph out of geo-processing components (out of WPS / java processes / WSDL?) and data sources Manual Workflow Definition, Automated Execution Allow users to register processes to the system Exports such workflows in different workflow dialects via a WSDL / SOAP interface (priority: the dialect used by the HUMBOLDT Mediator Service) Help the user in the composition process, by: type checking inputs and outputs when connecting type checking user entered input values Some small graphical features that make the composition process easierThe Graphical User Interface of the WDCS, called the Workflow Editor, can be used by usersto register processing components and to specify chains / compositions of such components(i.e. workflows). The GUI offers therefore quite a similar functionality as e.g. the GUI of theArcGIS Model Builder or a BPEL Workflow Designer but additionally provides assistance tothe user in the composition process by e.g. comparing the input/output type definitions of thecomponents to be connected. For example, this prevents users from connecting componentsprocessing raster data with processing component accepting vector data and hence reduces therisk of runtime errors when executing the composition. Currently, the processes to becomposed can either be exposed as OGC WPS Processes or directly implemented in java andaccessible to the HUMBOLDT Mediator Service.The Workflow Editor acts as a client application to the Workflow Repository and allows usersto deploy the workflows such that they will be subsequently offered via the web serviceinterface of the Workflow Service.The geo-processing workflows to be built with the Workflow Editor follow the structure ofdataflow graphs, a well-know concept in software engineering. A dataflow graph is a graph G= (V,E) with V=GD being a set of nodes and E= (D×GG) a set of directed edges. G is the setof processing nodes associated with computational components, in the case of the workfloweditor, geo-processing components. D is the set of data-providing nodes associated with dataproviding components. A directed edge E connects a node associated with a data providing orcomputational component to another computational component. In case a computationalcomponent has multiple inputs (often called input ports), there can be multiple edges pointingto it, each one associated with a different input. In case a processing node has multiple outputsor the output shall be pushed as input to multiple input ports of a single or multiple otherprocessing nodes, several edges from such a processing node might exist.The computational components represented by the nodes G in a dataflow graph are required to07 March 2013 110 of 44
  • 115. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasbe function-like in the sense that they generate the same output given the same input and donot depend on some changing states (such as a global variable that is not a direct parameter).Further, the direct edges represent the dataflow between nodes. A node in a dataflow graphcan be “executed”, if the data of all other input nodes that provide the input via a dataflowedge is available. Due to the function-like nature of the processing nodes, the outcome of awhole dataflow graph of such components is determined solely by the input passed to it andcan therefore be treated similar as a simple or atomic node and composed.Figure 94 Humboldt Workflow DesignThis project collects the HUMBOLDT Service Integration Framework sub-projects,specifically: the Mediator Service (MS), a harmonization work-flow execution engine, the Workflow Construction and Design Service (WDCS), an harmonisation needs analysis and workflow construction component, the Model Repository (MR), a conceptual schema and mappings repository, the Context Service (CS), a service for managing product descriptions for transformation results and the Information Grounding Service (IGS), a bridge component to existing catalogue services.Taverna Workbench Name: Taverna Workbench Version: 2.2 Platform: independent, language Java Vendor: myGrid, OMII-UK Licence: LGPL Homepage: http://www.taverna.org.uk/Taverna is an open source and domain independent Workflow Management System – a suite07 March 2013 111 of 44
  • 116. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasof tools used to design and execute scientific workflows and aid in silico experimentation.Taverna has been created by the myGrid team and funded through the OMII-UK. The projecthas guaranteed funding until 2014.The Taverna suite is written in Java and includes the Taverna Engine (used for enactingworkflows) that powers both the Taverna Workbench (the desktop client application, Figure 7)and the Taverna Server (which allows remote execution of workflows). Taverna is alsoavailable as a Command Line Tool for a quick execution of workflows from a terminal.Taverna allows you to define how your data flows between the services, without having toworry how you are going to invoke these services. It will automate and pipeline processing ofdata.Figure 95 Taverna WorkbenchSuite of tools to design, edit and execute workflows Workflow design and execution in Taverna Workbench Command line execution of workflows Remote execution of workflows on a Taverna server Invoke workflows from the InternetWide range of services and extensible architecture - Service discovery - Various service types available: WSDL-style and RESTful Web services, BioMart, BioMoby, SoapLab, R, Beanshell, Excel and csv spreadsheets, pyWPS - Service creation for external tools or Java libraries - Extensible service plug-in architecture for adding new service typesSecure Support for secure services Secure management of users’ credentialsVersatile Workbench07 March 2013 112 of 44
  • 117. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Tabs for finding, designing and executing workflows Fully graphical workflow design Drag and drop workflow components Comprehensive undo/redo Built-in help facility Annotations for describing workflows, services, inputs, outputs Workflow validation and debuggingCreate your own or start from existing workflows - Easy design of new workflows - Load existing workflows (from a disk, myExperiment or a URL) - View workflow layout and logic - Modify existing workflows - Load workflows in off-line mode (when disconnected from the Internet) - Nested workflows (sub workflows) - Workflow validation during design time for debugging while composing a workflow - Built-in detection when a service’s interface changes or a service go off-line during design timeFind workflows created by others and share yours Full myExperiment search options for browsing workflows Publish workflows on myExperiment for use by othersExecute and debug your workflows • Execute workflows • Remember previously used workflow inputs • Save workflow input values used to a file • Load workflow input values from a file • Pipelining and streaming of data • Implicit iteration of service calls • Conditional and repeated calling of services • Customizable looping over a service • Failover and retry of service calling • Parallel execution and configurable number of concurrent threads • Improved error handling and reporting for debugging during run time • Monitor workflow execution • Pause/resume or cancel workflow execution • Manage previous runs and workflow results • View intermediate results and debug workflows at run time • Filter and save intermediate and final workflow resultsTrack workflow runs and results • Record workflow execution provenance • Review provenance of previous workflow runs10 HABITATS Pilots’ Network ServicesHABITATS deals with 7 pilot implementations in different regions of Europe and the differentregions use different technologies. The objective of HABITATS is to demonstrate the sharingof data among such heterogeneous solutions. D4.1 indicates that SDI tools can be applied in07 March 2013 113 of 44
  • 118. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasHABITATS on the basis of analysis of user needs and user scenarios, the project plans todefine a set of application independent services (GENESIS model of Generic services) andinteractions of these services for concrete pilots.D4.1 gives a good overview of current regulations, trends and recommendations coming fromresearch projects, as well as information on how different commercial and voluntaryinitiatives can be integrated. From the analysis it is clear that INSPIRE is a minimum set,which has to be taken into consideration, for the HABITATS architecture, allowing each pilotto work with its own methods and technologies, while adhering to the conditions of theINSPIRE Directive concerning: • Metadata • Interoperability of spatial datasets and services • Network services • Data sharing • Monitoring and reportingFor the (i) Metadata, (ii) Network Services, (iii) Monitoring and (iv) Reporting INSPIRE haspublished first implementing rules. The rules for the second and fourth have been publishedrecently. The metadata for HABITAT’s four themes must wait until 2012. With theseconditions the HABITATS pilots must build their SDIs and successfully share their data. Thefirst step for all pilots is to create metadata for their data and services. The second importantstep may be to prepare some network services, following the ISO and OGC recommendationsfor data specifications and data sharing, and then complete them when the implementing ruleswill be published. The model of D4.1 and the other examples inside it show the way to buildthe HABITATS infrastructure.Experiences from different European projects demonstrate that the INSPIRE architecture isnot enough for implementation of real practical pilot applications. Some basic architectureprinciples and also basic generic architecture are very similar. The analysis demonstrates, thatit is important for pilot implementations to analyse user needs and describe these needs byUse Cases. Concrete Use Cases can define changes in concrete architecture. Integration ofcommercial and voluntary services can also increase functionality in applications such astourism.Experiences from other projects demonstrate the advantage when the first level architecture isdesigned as an independent platform and then concrete components are selected forimplementation. There exists a large list of basic components, both proprietary and OpenSources.According to the HABITATS user-driven approach to standardisation, the full impact ofresults will be sparked off by the pilot service scenarios and their ability to attract newparticipants to the communities of adoption. Each of the HABITATS pilots is therefore builton: a) existing concrete services currently carried out by project partners, b) potentials of data access through network services and c) enhancement through usage scenarios developed by user communities, in order to meet the three HABITATS criteria of relevance, openness and responsiveness.Much of the success of this will be based on cross-regional Services and data access. The07 March 2013 114 of 44
  • 119. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituaspilots, as described in the DoW, fall into the following trans-regional categories: 1. Management of natural resources o Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE) o La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES) 2. Eco-tourism o Hiking Trip Planner (IT) o Soria Natural Reserve (ES) 3. Economic activities o Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT) o Economic activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV) 4. National policy o Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)While D2.4.1 identified the following trans-regional groupings. 1. Potential benefits of user involvement influence data modeling and standards adoption. • Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE) • Economic Activity of Marine HABITATS (LV) • Forest Management (CZ) 2. Direct expert/end-user interaction with a data modeling process. • Monitoring Protected Marine Area (ES) • Environmental Education in a Natural Reserve (ES) 3. User-driven co-design of services leading to “demand pull” INSPIRE adoption. • Hiking Trip Planner (IT) • Sheep and Goat Herding Management (IT)D2.4.2 found that all Pilots have much to be learned, shared and potential for collaborationwith the other Pilots particularly with regard to common pan-European data themes andsources on (i) Tourism, (ii) Education and (iii) Environmental Conservation/Management.Each of these validation pilots relies on trans-regional and trans-European data sharingbetween pilot settings, within INSPIRE networks present in the project and with collaboratingmembers of the HABITATS User Communities.Pilot actors include stakeholders participating in the management of platforms, data ownersand producers and contributors to services and user groups of all pilots. D4.2.1 tabulates thegeneric use cases from the pilots, as well their user groups and generic roles. From these itidentifies that the services based on external data in HABITATS requires the following basicoperations: • Data discovery • Storage metadata about services on server • Data visualisation • Data downloadPILOTS DESCRIPTIONSWILD SALMON MONITORINGMAC works with the Irish Marine Institute (www.marine.ie) at its Aquaculture and Catchment07 March 2013 115 of 44
  • 120. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasManagement Facility in Newport, Co. Mayo, Ireland(www.marine.ie/home/aboutus/organisationstaff/serviceareas/ACMS.htm), focusing on themonitoring and analysis of wild salmon stock dynamics. Wild salmon data that have beencollected by the Marine Institute is accessible to provide better intelligence to researchers,fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation, so that they can better manage thewild-salmon resource in a sustainable manner and help prevent the extinction of wild salmonin rivers on the North Atlantic coast of Europe Irish Marine Institute collects and owns thedata, but collaborates with other Marine Institutes and the North Atlantic SalmonConservation Organisation. The service to be piloted package and provide that data as betterintelligence to researchers, fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation.Also MAC focused the Irish HABITATS pilot on the wider communities’ identification,reporting, and recording for subsequent eradication of AIS instances as they relate to salmonand all inland and coastal native fish species conservation in Ireland and Europe, bydeveloping a phone app and system that involves the wider communities through awareness,using social media, crowd-sourcing and open map-based geo-data for the identification,reporting, and recording for subsequent eradication of AIS.The HABITATS AIS Phone App is easy to download from the Google Play Store and use.Figure 96 Aquatic Invasive SpeciesIt empowers everyone to record an instance of an Aquatic Invasive Species with an user-ID,photograph, text report, time and GPS location on their smartphone, with guidance and adviceon how best to record and photograph each sighting.Figure 97 Aquatic Invasive Species App07 March 2013 116 of 44
  • 121. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe App also shows a map of the previous verified AIS sightings to foster each user’s socialnetworking/community building, with a link to the IFI Facebook site, to allow userstell/discuss with their friends about their sightings and use of the App.To increase awareness of AIS and the threat that they pose, the App includes much on-phoneinformation and images of aquatic invasive species, with advice and plans on aquaticbiosecurity for anglers and fishermen in particular (as their practices can have a huge impacton the spread of AIS).Figure 98 AIS classificationWhen a sighting is reported, it is verified and the AIS classified on a private ManagementConsole space at www.habitats.ie by IFI researchers and experts.Figure 99 Integration with RL07 March 2013 117 of 44
  • 122. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 100 AIS sightingOnce the AIS sighting and classification is verified, it is automatically uploaded and recordedas a point for display on an OGC-compliant layer of IFI’s ESRI/ArcGIS Viewer. Each point iscolour coded to indicate its status, such as eradication action taken and reports on the resultsachieved, for subsequent feedback to all stakeholders.The process of transferring the data to the IFI GIS format for monitoring and reporting, allowsthe exploration of the INSPIRE/metadata aspects (e.g. using the HABITATS Metadata profileadapted to HB V2 Data Spec, use of EUNIS, etc) that HABITATS aims to provide best-practice recommendations for the INSPIRE habitats-related themes, as they pertain to salmonand other inland and coastal fish species.Figure 101 Ireland Pilot architectureThis architecture allows an open transfer to other applications and pilots as follows:07 March 2013 118 of 44
  • 123. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 102 Publishing • The back-end (blue items) can be reused and transferred for any App. - To run on MAC’s existing Server or be transferred to another Server (such as Madonie Park) • The App structure can be reused if it follows the same generic process - find something on a list - record it by its location and an uploaded picture. - for instance the Active Hiker App in Madonie Park.The Irish Pilot’s architecture allows its data to be published using WMS and WFS servicesusing GeoNetwork and GeoServer on the Irish Portal at www.habitats-ireland.eu, to make theHABITATS services discoverable and usable by external platforms.23LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE RESERVEThe pilot takes place in the La Palma Protected Marine Reserve in the Canary Islands.However, harmonization and standardization of this kind of data and making them available ina national or European level is considered to be useful for any coast area with similarproblematic. When using sensors and in order to make it simple for our purpose, the coastarea of this PMA has been divided into two subareas that is defined as open sea (not morethan 600 m from the coast) and border sea. With the same criteria, indicators that we will takeinto account will be: biological parameters or physical-chemical parameters and only the threeamong the most relevant ones will be taken for each one of the subareas.23 KML may also be adopted later, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language07 March 2013 119 of 44
  • 124. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 103 Sea MonitoringThe use of images and voice recognition systems have been studied when the humanintervention is needed. All these data is georeferenced in cartographic maps.The main stakeholder involved in the development of this pilot is TRAGSATEC. Some othercollaborators are companies manufacturing sensors and developing voice, fishermen, divingclubs, hotels, farmers, etc. Its business model is based in the service funded & extended bypublic agency responsible for PMAs in Spain.The pilot scheme that is:Figure 104 La Palma Pilot Scheme07 March 2013 120 of 44
  • 125. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasIn this pilot there were obtained data from a sensor system and from a sensor connector westore these data in a database. This first database is a SQL DBMS in the form of tables and therelationship among the data is also stored in tables.From these tables, the representative geodata were got in shapefile format. The platform topublish these data is composed by Geoserver, Geonetwork with PostgreSQL. This platformworks with WMS, WFS, WCS and CSW standards and allows View and Discovery services.The download service has been deployed for the shapefiles and the results of theharmonization through the ESRI software. The metadata profile was filled with CatMDEdit.The viewer done in FLEX allows us to do pan, zoom, change the numeric scale, add favouriteviews, switch off/on layers, change the opacity of the layers, add external layers (currentlyonly WMS), check the layer info, situation minimap, table of contents, hide/show, etc. TheURL to the geoportal is http://habitatspre.tragsatec.es/visorhabitats/ .Figure 105 La Palma portalIn the catalogue section we can search more layers, watch the metadata and use the metadataeditor if we have got the permission access.07 March 2013 121 of 44
  • 126. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 106 La Palma metadataWe are working to allow the addition of elements metadata themes to the metadata profile. Itis really hard and it’s generating bugs in the Geonetwork catalogue. Also we are migratingfrom version 2.6.3 to 2.6.4.Currently we use Geoserver 2.0.2 that serve WMS 1.1.1 but we are migrating to Geoserver2.2. that allows WMS 1.3 and it’s completely INPIRE compliant.Part of work was focused on publishing the spatial data in other formats like WFS or KML.Lately we are working with NSI to develop a Business Intelligence platform based inSpagoBI.MADONIE HIKING TRIP PLANNERThis pilot is situated inside the Madonie Park, Sicily (Italia), but could be widely replicablethroughout the Mediterranean. The Park Authority developed a multimedia repertory of manyof the park’s main features – including both natural elements and places of traditional farmingand herding – and, in the context of on-going initiatives, developed an interactive multimediamap of the area that allows hikers to plan visits as a function of the natural elements to see.The validation pilot in HABITATS integrates habitats-related data into this map, to allow toview bio-geographical regions within the park. In addition, use of mobile platforms (wherecoverage is available) is a great tool.Finally, the currently planned facility allowing for users to upload multimedia content andinsert comments and suggestions are enhanced to validate the possibility for users to insertcontent through the SDI. The possibility to signal sightings of different species (i.e. throughdigital photos with time date and location stamp) also is being integrated.This pilot makes significant use of the information in the regional Carta Natura database, andalso access databases from other regions in order, for example, to compare habitats indifferent geographical contexts.07 March 2013 122 of 44
  • 127. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasMADONIA SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTIn the Madonie Park, over 1,500m is dominated by the Madonie Forest while lower down theslopes, the locals continue to pursue millennial agricultural activities including sheep andcattle farming and the cultivation of wheat, olives and fruit. This gives rise to specifictraditions such as the seasonal “transumanza” when herds are moved from their summer towinter pastures and back, and contributes to the Madonie’s gastronomic specialties of meat,sausages, salami, cheese, olives, mushrooms, and fresh seasonal vegetables.Also the pilot is coherent with the Park’s mission but is also an element of the TLL-Sicilypartnership’s innovation piloting strategy.Figure 107 Madonia ArchitectureIn order to go toward a system “INSPIRE compliant” is necessary to make people, at MadoniePark, works in a way useful to realize some INSPIRE instances (such as metadata definition,organized way to archive data (both spatial and non-spatial, use of data located on a remoteserver accessible by web services, publication of web service for data locally managed).The scheme of work of this pilot is like it:07 March 2013 123 of 44
  • 128. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 108 Madonia implementationSome activities on data regarding both two pilot projects have been carried out: Data conversion for existing database (conversion of format, native SRS to UTM-WGS84 zone 33); Georeferencing of non-spatial data (data in pictorial format); Vector format acquisition and database structuring; Definition of thematic data structure – according to GEMET ( http://www.eionet.europa.eu/gemet/inspire_themes ) - useful to allocate data sets. Selection of some hiking paths available in vector format (shapefiles); Selection of waypoints to be superimposed to path (also for selection by queries); Acquisition of management plan of the park area; Definition of path and geographic objects representation (symbols useful to represent land structure, infrastructures present in the park, etc.); Acquisition of grazing plan from paper maps or .pdf files; Structuring and filling the database for grazing plan; Definition of new layer based on the way adopted for the assignment of grazing area to each shepherd or breeder (work in progress); Definition of an agreement between Sicily Region Administration and Madonie Park by which metadata of new dataset will be published on Geoportal of Sicily Region at ARTA Sicilia, while data should remain available for the access, by web services, on the site of Madonie Park WEBGIS Application (work in progress);07 March 2013 124 of 44
  • 129. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Some adaptation work in order to made data set suitable to be accessed as web service; Selected data in raster and/or vector format moved inside a thematic structure in order to easily manage of find them; In this preliminary stage only one platform has been put up with the main goal to interact with staholders speaking on tangible example. This WEBGIS is based on MapServer + Pmapper 4.0 and operates: with a typical WEBGIS interface the will be the final interface only for the pilot on Sheep and Goat Herd Management; on data sets regarding both two Pilot Projects; on data sets made available from Inspire GeoPortal of ARTA Scilia (Sicily Region Land and Environmet Administration); web services on local data-sets are to be published.AUGMENTED REALITY NATURAL RESERVEThe strength of the pilot is that if a standardization of the data and metadata modelling for thiskind of environmental tourism is defined, some other standards will appear for the specifichardware that is needed for its representation and the idea of environmental tourism couldequally be developed in the whole Europe.The objective of this pilot have been to develop a system that, using real nature informationand adding metadata to real images (texts, images, sounds, etc.), allows improvingenvironmental tourism with a real respective nature observation. Introducing interpretationinformation and augmented reality we will particularly protect fragile areas.There were developed two ways in the Augmented Reality: Augmented reality device on a outdoor stageFigure 109 Augment Reality Technology Augmented reality app for Android07 March 2013 125 of 44
  • 130. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 110 Android AppThis technology works for us as the following way:Figure 111 Augment Reality SchemeSome aspects must be clear: The data model depends on the themes that we choose to show in the augmented reality.07 March 2013 126 of 44
  • 131. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas We must work only with graphic data (spatial data)To do that we have used the following tools: Proprietary software based on Android for mobile. Proprietary software based on Linux for the augmented reality device. ArcGIS software to process data. GeoServer to publish our spatial data.The initial working schema of this pilot is like it:Figure 112 Augment Reality ImplementationThe View service must be process through our Augmented Reality software to be displayed inthe AR devices and mobile phones. From these platforms we could work to implement theWeb 2.0 for the users. The data was processed in shape format. There were launched theplatform also in Geoserver with the Geonetwork software to get a catalogue. With thisplatform we have created WMS services and the metadata profile.As metadata editor was used the Geonetwork catalogue. The ISO 19115 and ISO 19139 arethe standards to comply the INSPIRE mandatory profile.The address to access to geoportal is http://habitatspre.tragsatec.es/visorRa/ .07 March 2013 127 of 44
  • 132. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 113 Pilot portalAs the above pilot, in the catalogue section we can search more layers, watch the metadataand use the metadata editor if we have got the permission access. Anyway, the metadataprofile was filled with CatMDEdit. Also the download service has been deployed for theshapefiles and the results of the harmonization through the ESRI software.Figure 114 Pilot MetadataCurrently we use Geoserver 2.0.2 that serve WMS 1.1.1 but we are migrating to Geoserver2.2. that allows WMS 1.3 and it’s completely INPIRE compliant.We are working to allow the addition of elements metadata themes to the metadata profile. It07 March 2013 128 of 44
  • 133. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasis really hard and it’s generating bugs in the Geonetwork catalogue. Also we are migratingfrom version 2.6.3 to 2.6.4.Additionally the possibility to download the shapefiles exists in the Download section.And finally we uploaded the app for Android devices to the Google Play (Android market).Everybody can install the app for free.07 March 2013 129 of 44
  • 134. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATSIMCS cooperate with the Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology using the monitoring data ofcoastal benthic communities and related environmental parameters. The needs andrequirements of various stakeholders are researched and afterwards IMCS pilot the use ofadvanced interfaces to improve presentation, accessibility and use of the data. It will help indecision making for port construction measures, fisheries policy, wind mill developmentactions in order to use the benthic habitats in sustainable way. The benthic habitats in Latviancoastal waters are the areas with highest biological diversity and partly included covered byNATURA 2000 territories.The architecture of the Latvia Coastal HABITATS pilot is designed in this way:Figure 115 Coastal HABITATS pilot is designThe work with data and meta-data is the following: Data For OGC WMS,WFS services uses MapServer As default web client is used modified OpenLyers but can be replaced by any other client (e.g. HSLayers, MapFish); As desktop data management tool is used QuantumGIS that can be replaced by any other desktop solution; As main database is used PostgreSQL with PostGIS;07 March 2013 130 of 44
  • 135. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Meta-data For metadata it uses the meta-data system Micka. Meta-data system in use is (http://geoportal.tdf.lv )Some sources of these data to build a base dataset have provided only from one organization(biotopes, water bodies, monitoring data, Natura2000), the Latvian Institute of AquaticEcology.Figure 116 Latvian Pilot Implementation07 March 2013 131 of 44
  • 136. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 117 Latvian portalAlso the basic requirements for Web Processing Service (WPS) content was formalized.Regarding the meta-data for datasets, a ISO19115 compliant form has been created in Latvianand English language.Implementation of INSPIRE requirements in Latvia is gradual and motivation to be involveddepends on the pressure by Directive/respective national legislation.Figure 118 Processing servicesThe basic requirements for Web Processing Service (WPS) content are being formalized andthe WPS implementation is in progress. Service implementation is according OGC standard.07 March 2013 132 of 44
  • 137. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe end user web application can use in background WPS, but interface and usage for endusers must follow KISS principle.For economic activity decision by running WPS the following information is needed: Natura 2000. Other important national sites with restrictions. Military zones. Traffic, transportation and communication infrastructure areas Depth data (depth over -30m is not economically reasonable and supported), Distance form coastline, it is possible to be calculated using coastline and choosed location data. Ice in winter. Identified areas with allowed buildings but with strict identification of type and purpose.The conclusions are: We have OGC service (WMS, WFS) platform based on MapServer. The spatial data were collected from available data. They are harmonized by corresponding theme. Meta-data profile preparation in meta-data system Micka is in progress by HS- RS. Based on HABITATS meta-data profile created first Latvian pilot data meta- data descriptions. Since HABITATS profile is not implemented in our meta- data system meta-data are describe in ISO standard since HABITATS and INSPIRE profiles are subset from ISO. View and download services are working. And we have got a web based platform.NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMMEScenarios from NFP centres are coordinated with border cross countries. Metadata, geometricand semantic harmonisation of multiple representations and different sources of geodata areconcentrated according to GMES.Simple scheme for the First use case - "Forest site classification data for sustainablemanagement and utilization of forest road network" is displayed bellow:07 March 2013 133 of 44
  • 138. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 119 FMI pilot schemeFMI has a long experience with MapServer, so this experience and the know-how will bedeveloped further. However, we have huge data warehouse, which need to be restructured.Metadata for all datasets in Use case 1 has been created and will be placed on both geoportals:the National and the HABITATS portals.The pilot can offer: Datasets for HABITATS reference laboratory WMS service Validated metadata (available both in English and Czech language)07 March 2013 134 of 44
  • 139. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 120 OPRL DataThere were urdates data models to be suitable for new technologies. Nowadays ourstakeholders are using our geoportal (http://geoportal2.uhul.cz/wms_oprl?SERVICE=WMS)with only WMS service and not quite so interoperable client, which has serious problemsacross different browsers. Geoportal client side uses modified Openlayers and on the serverside is working UMN mapserver.There were tested software architectures with Geonetwork/Geoserver and Geohosting/Mickaand both are more or less suitable for our purposes. The FMI uses LDAP authenticationprotocol for all Microsoft and Unix desktop clients, therefore administrative part of thegeoportal should have the same login backend07 March 2013 135 of 44
  • 140. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas11 Interoperability and invocation testsInteroperability and Enabling ServicesD4.2.1 identified that the following interoperability and enabling services that will be requiredin HABITATS:• Discovery - provides the access to HABITATS and external metadata to users or to other system components. It implements search/discovery services, thus exposes catalogue services.• View - view services perform the rendering of “generic data” (catalogue entry, map image,…) into an output format that will be delivered to the user through the “horizontal service” and then through the application services.• Data services - implements view and download services, thus exposes map/feature services. • View: view services allow display, navigate, zoom in and out, pan or overlay viewable spatial data sets and display legend information and any relevant content of metadata. • Download: download services allow extracting copies of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to be downloaded and, where practicable, accessed directly24.• Transformation is designed to carry out the mapping between the application schemas of HABITATS and the application schemas of the data provided by the partners.• Analysis - implements transform services (as per D3.5 – INSPIRE Network Services Architecture v2.0), thus exposes map/feature transform services.• Monitoring - as basic tools will be established monitoring based on logins of users. A full log analysis will be provided:• External services - Discovery, view, data, transformation, analysis, authorization and authentication services can be implemented as internal, or can be used as external services coming from remote servers. Interfaces are the same as for internal services.• Applications - The geo-portal is not tools for standard users. For most users there are important applications. The idea of the HABITATS architecture is to ensure that Applications are not developed as independent proprietary solutions, but are composed from existing services, using the HABITATS RL portal infrastructure.• Applets – are programs written in the Java programming language that can be included in an HTML page, much in the same way as an image is included in a page. When a user uses a Java technology-enabled browser to view a page that contains an applet, the applets code is transferred to their system and executed by the browsers Java Virtual Machine (JVM).• Servlets - is a Java class in Java EE that conforms to the Java Servlet API, a protocol by which a Java class may respond to HTTP requests. They are not tied to a specific client- server protocol, but are most often used with this protocol. A Servlet is an object that receives a request and generates a response based on that request.• Portlets - are pluggable user interface software components that are managed and displayed in a web portal. Portlets produce fragments of markup code that are aggregated into a portal .• WMC - Web Map Context (WMC) describes how to save a map view comprised of many24 From D3.5 – INSPIRE Network Services Architecture v2.007 March 2013 136 of 44
  • 141. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas different layers from different Web Map Servers.• RSS/GeoRSS - RSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically.• KML/KMZ - Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML schema for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers.• CMS - A content management system (CMS) is the collection of procedures used to manage work flow in a collaborative environment. These procedures can be manual or computer-based. The procedures are designed to do the following: ◦ Allow for a large number of people to contribute to and share stored data ◦ Control access to data, based on user roles (defining which information users or user groups can view, edit, publish, etc.) ◦ Aid in easy storage and retrieval of data ◦ Reduce repetitive duplicate input ◦ Improve the ease of report writing ◦ Improve communication between users• Social Networks and Media - Social media are media for social interaction, using highly accessible and scalable publishing techniques. Social media use web-based technologies to turn communication into interactive dialog. A common thread running through all definitions of social media is a blending of technology and social interaction for the co- creation of value.25• Workflow management - A workflow consists of a sequence of connected steps. It is a depiction of a sequence of operations, declared as the work of a person, a group of persons, an organization of staff, or one or more simple or complex mechanisms. Workflow may be seen as any abstraction of real work.3.2 HABITATS “Quick Prototyping” Service AppletsDuring phase 2 of the project, the pilots implemented “quick” and “light” on-demand appletsto meet the validation pilot expectations and user needs. These “Quick Prototyping” serviceapplets will run within the HABITATS service architecture and will be developed on-demand.They include: • Discussion forums with the ability to pre-set data layers on map views • Timeline services to visualize the evolution of spatial phenomena over time • Transformation and harmonisation services • Tools for sharing data and services • Services for the bottom-up introduction of spatial data by local citizens and businesses and validation by the relevant local authorities • Other specific components supporting participatory and social innovation processes.25 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media07 March 2013 137 of 44
  • 142. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe interoperability tests IMCS RLDuring project validation phase we provide tests of discovery, visualization and analysis ofdata from IMCS pilot. The focus was on usage of IMCS harmonized data services inHABITATS reference laboratory together with additional pilot data and provide integrationwith additional Pan European Data as Natura 2000, Corine Land Cover and OSM data.Figure 121 Harmonised data publishing on RLIRISH TEST WITH RLThe Irish data of invasive spices was published using Geoserver as WMS and KML and wastested using the RL.The following show views of the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal.07 March 2013 138 of 44
  • 143. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 122 Invasive species on RLFigure 123 Invasive species on RLLA PALMA RESERVE MARINE PILOT TEST WITH RLThe data of La Palma Reserve Marine, bathymetry, sample points, marine area, reservemarine, and land use, using Geoserver as WMS was tested using the RL.07 March 2013 139 of 44
  • 144. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 124 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=44b2ad495fd262b365f8fdb5310a1458AUGMENTED REALITY NATURE RESERVE PILOT TEST WITH RLThe data used in the Augmented Reality Nature Reserve pilot, surface waters, speciesdistribution, buildings, and geographical names, using Geoserver as WMS was tested usingthe RL.07 March 2013 140 of 44
  • 145. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 125 The screen capture shows the data as it appears on the HABITATS RL Geoportal:http://www.habitats.cz/view?permalink=8555142bd2d6f5462d4f766015bc4776FMI LIBEREC REGION TEST OF REFERENCE LABORATORYRegion Liberec decided to use and implement HABITATS Reference Laboratory for thepurpose of environmental management and risk protection services in region. Liberec regionwith assistance of HSRS implement RL on their servers and provided customisation of RL fortheir own purposes. There were implemented full operational services based on RL.As second part of experiment, the harmonised data from Forest Management Institute wasused for the purpose of forestry protection policies in Liberec regionLiberec Geoportal includes standard RL Geoportal components.07 March 2013 141 of 44
  • 146. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 126 Liberec Basic portal functionalityBut geoportal include set ot thematic maps based on Geoportal functionality andimplementation of WMC standardsFigure 127 Liberec Thematic Maps using standardised data from FMISets of applications solving crises management, protection of citizens, environment protectionetc.07 March 2013 142 of 44
  • 147. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFigure 128 Flood portal as part of GeoportalAnd also materials for education and awarenessFigure 129 Education and awarenessFor this solution, there are two important facts. There were applied Living Lab and OpenInnovation methodology, applied methods of HABITATS design and development (LiberecGeportal is implementation of HABITATS Reference Laboratory Concept) and mainimportant fact is, that the content is prepared by non-programmers, specialist on Environment.In next chapter the general principles of HABITATS development and architecture will beexplainEXPERIMENTATION WITH OPEN LINKED DATAAs test for interlinked Open Linked data was design testing application, which tries to collectas much as possible data sets, process them to acquire relevant information and present theinformation in intelligible and simple way. The information are collected from many07 March 2013 143 of 44
  • 148. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasinformation resources (with open or free access to data) and transformed to the common datastructure (with own schema taken account of metadata related to original source and timeinformation) based on Extensible Markup Language (XML) format. The collected informationare evaluated according to importance and reliability of particular resources. The original dataare transformed to uniform data set with using XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language –Transformation) templates and open-source Saxon-HE processor. Users get the most relevantinformation, including links to original sources and a possibility to compare it with othercollected data. Data is presented as the KML (Kyehole Markup Language) file of ski resorts(including information derived from the input sources) and web pages in HTML (HypertextMarkup Language) 5 format connected to other features such as map or graph components.The application uses ECMA script libraries such as Google Chart Tools or RGraph.Figure 130 Integration of Open Linked data from skiing resorts07 March 2013 144 of 44
  • 149. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas12 Conclusions and RecommendationsThis report presents the status of the work of HABITATS towards Networking Services andInvoking tools. HABITATS Networking Services are a series of specific networking serviceapplets deployed and tested for data sharing within the project. The set of services wasimplemented on the HABITATS Reference Laboratory (RL) geoportal platform, which isdescribed in detail. These include both interoperability services and enabling services, such asthe • visualisation of information layers, • overlay of information from different sources, • spatial and temporal analysis etc.The set of HABITATS Networking Services has been implemented on the HABITATSReference Laboratory (RL) geoportal platform. This acted as a client of the seven HABITATSpilots and provides a very rich set of cross-pilot, inter-regional and enabling services and toolsthat were validated by users on the basis of concrete implementations in phase 2 of theproject. The applets for specific applications were developed in response to user requests ateach pilot during phase 2 of the project.The following cross-pilot themes are identified, where common sharing of data andnetworking services will be important to all of the HABITATS pilots: 1. Tourism – pan-European search for data 2. Education 3. Environmental Conservation and ManagementThe HABITATS RL provided the common services and tools, and acts as a clearing house forsuch data, based on cross pilot use cases. The following functionality was required and wasdeveloped for use in phase 2 of the project. Connected different catalogue Harvest metadata from catalogues Multi search for catalogues Discovery data Upload and download data Publish data Prepare data composition Harmonise data Provide transformation to other type of services Generate iFrame with pre prepared maps for re use on other portals (with well defined API) Light WordPress based Social portal Mobile catalogue clients Mobile applications Augment reality toolsFrom the testing, we can conclude, that for broader utilisation of SDI on local and regionallevel it is necessary to go beyond the frame of the current INSPIRE Networking Services andInvoking tools specification. The current INSPIRE based solutions are not sufficient for localand regional users. It leads in some cases to a negative view by local stakeholders on07 March 2013 145 of 44
  • 150. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasINSPIRE implementation. The HABITATS RL and pilots demonstrate such an approach andthe result is infrastructure, which is accepted by users’ communities. It is necessary tocontinue in such way. The HABITATS experimentation demonstrates, that in the case, that weare able to extend the current concept of INSPIRE, the services and toolkits could help in theeveryday lives of local and regional users.On other hand HABITATS demonstrates, that most of current GIS Web based solutions areuntil now poor applications; they are not building on the principle of services. This conceptdoesn’t give the possibility to take full advantage of SDI. Proprietary applications are oftenbased on data replication and don’t support integration of distributed services. Spatial data isused only in one application and it is a problem to use them in another Web or desktopapplications. This application based system doesn’t allow building new types of service andreally open SDI. Such a way will in the future make life easier for all developers, systemproviders and also users.But on the other hand it is an important fact. Current INSPIRE (but also GEOSS and partlyGMES) architectures are mainly focused on development of Geoportals. But a normal userdoesn’t need Geoportals, which are only a framework for experts, allowing them to buildsolutions for final users. We have to change the concept of Geoportals to being a tool, thatsupport the building of new levels of “applications”. It has to be applications that use all of theadvantages of existing SDI. It is important to design methods, which allow building of serviceorientated solutions. And it is also important, not to be only so called “GIS centred”, but tobuild a new generation of applications combining geospatial and non-geospatial information,in line with the initial intentions of SISE. So we tried in HABITATS to introduce a newgeneration of applications which fully benefit from SDI: • service based – with limiting data replication, re usage of existing components. • supporting integration with other systems • supporting also integration with social networksThe main extension, which was demonstrate by HABITATS are: • To extend the classical three layer architectural model of HABITATS, by two new levels – application and presentation layers • To support building of user applets, which could be easily modified by non-specialist? This idea is in line with current activities of the Future Internet • Not to be focused on standard geospatial data and services, but also support initiatives related to Open Linked Data, which could bring new quality into existing SDI applications. • Mobility, smartphones and tablets will probably be the main interfaces in the future for accessing SDI generally, and concretely the INSPIRE infrastructure. • Social Networks and Media has to be integrated with SDI • As the way for easy integration of heterogeneous data the KML format should be considered.07 March 2013 146 of 44
  • 151. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas13 References1. D2.2.1 HABITATS User Communities, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS2. D2.3.1 HABITATS State of Art, Scenarios and Requirements, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3- 250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS3. D2.4.1 & D2.4.2 HABITATS Impact Assessment, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS4. D3.1 HABITATS Conceptual Data Models, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS5. HABITATS, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats, D-3.2a – HABITATS - 2504556. D3.2.1 & D3.2.2 HABITATS Metadata profile, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS7. D3.3.1 & D3.3.2 HABITATS Data models, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3-2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS8. D3.4.1 HABITATS Transformation Process, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3-2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS9. D4.1 State-of-art of Existing SDIs, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3-2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS10. D4.2.1 & D4.2.2 HABITATS INSPIRE Networking Architecture, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3- 2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS11. D5.2.1 HABITATS Pilot Validation Platforms, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3-2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS12. Description of Work, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HABITATS, 2009-10-1613. Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 March 2007 establishing an Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community (INSPIRE)14. http://java.sun.com/applets/15. INSPIRE Network Services Drafting Team (2007), D3.5 – INSPIRE Network Services Architecture v2.016. ISO (2005), ISO 19119: Geographic information – Services17. ISO 19119 and OGC Service Architecture, George PERCIVALL, USA, http://www.fig.net/pub/fig_2002/JS4/JS4_percivall.pdf18. Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2004), Geospatial Portal Reference Architecture - A Community Guide to Implementing Standards-Based Geospatial Portals19. Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2004), OGC Web Map Service Interface20. Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2007), OpenGIS Catalogue Services Specification21. Percivall G. (2002), ISO 19119 and OGC Service Architecture¸ FIG XXII International Congress, Washington, D.C., USA22. Güting 2005: Ralf Hartmut Güting, Markus Schneider. Moving Objects Databases.2005, ISBN 978-0120887996.23. HABITATS DoW 2010: Description of Work, “Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex II Data Structures in EU HABITATS”07 March 2013 147 of 44
  • 152. Date: 7-Mar-13 HABITATS Networking Services and Service ToolkitsDoc. Identifier: D4.3.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas24. HABITATS D4.2.2 2011: D4.2.2 – INSPIRE Networking Architecture Design, 201125. HABITATS D4.3.1 2011: D4.3.1 – HABITATS networking services26. ISO/IEC 10746-1 Information technology – Open Distributed Processing – Reference model: Overview, ISO (1998)27. TAVERNA 2011: Taverna, What is a Workflow Management System? Taverna home page 2011. (http://www.taverna.org.uk/introduction/what-is-a-workflow-management-system/).28. Bregt, A., 2012. Cost-Benefit Analysis in Perspective.29. Harris, T. & Lafone, F., forthcoming. Toward an informal Spatial Data Infrastructure: Voluntary Geographic Information, Neogeography, and the role of citizen sensors. In O. Čerba & K. Čerbová, eds. SDI, Communities, and Social Media.30. Charvát, K., 2011. Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats.31. Charvát, K. et al., 2008. Uniform Resource Management. In IST Africa. Windhoek, Namibia.32. Wikipedia contributors, 2012a. Authentication. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Authentication&oldid=508518815 [Accessed September 4, 2012].33. Wikipedia contributors, 2012b. GeoRSS. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=GeoRSS&oldid=503593540 [Accessed September 5, 2012].34. Wikipedia contributors, 2012c. RSS. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=RSS&oldid=507169125 [Accessed September 5, 2012].35. Jachym Cepicky, Pavel Gnip, Stepan Kafka, Irena Koskova and Karel Charvat Geospatial data management and integration of geospatial web services, IAALD AFITA WCCA2008, Tokyo.36. INSPIRE Invoke Services 2009, Roberto Lucchi, Michel Millot, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability07 March 2013 148 of 44

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