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Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09
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Leadership Development for Lawyers March '09

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Leadership Development for Lawyers presentation

Leadership Development for Lawyers presentation

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  • Five Reasons Why You Have to Take Charge of Your Development You have already made an enormous investment of time and money in your career. It is up to you to own, manage and develop it. Nobody else will. Change is a constant. There is no standing still for practice areas, firms or the people who run them. When situations change, strengths can become weaknesses, weaknesses that did not matter before can become central, and arrogance based upon past success can become dangerous. It is no longer sufficient for lawyers to be superb specialists in their substantive areas of practice. Clients demand that they also have good: business and management skills; and leadership skills. Always make sure that, whatever you are doing, you are running towards something rather than away from something.
  • Five Reasons Why You Have to Take Charge of Your Development You have already made an enormous investment of time and money in your career. It is up to you to own, manage and develop it. Nobody else will. Change is a constant. There is no standing still for practice areas, firms or the people who run them. When situations change, strengths can become weaknesses, weaknesses that did not matter before can become central, and arrogance based upon past success can become dangerous. It is no longer sufficient for lawyers to be superb specialists in their substantive areas of practice. Clients demand that they also have good: business and management skills; and leadership skills. Always make sure that, whatever you are doing, you are running towards something rather than away from something.
  • Five Reasons Why You Have to Take Charge of Your Development You have already made an enormous investment of time and money in your career. It is up to you to own, manage and develop it. Nobody else will. Change is a constant. There is no standing still for practice areas, firms or the people who run them. When situations change, strengths can become weaknesses, weaknesses that did not matter before can become central, and arrogance based upon past success can become dangerous. It is no longer sufficient for lawyers to be superb specialists in their substantive areas of practice. Clients demand that they also have good: business and management skills; and leadership skills. Always make sure that, whatever you are doing, you are running towards something rather than away from something.
  • Five Reasons Why You Have to Take Charge of Your Development You have already made an enormous investment of time and money in your career. It is up to you to own, manage and develop it. Nobody else will. Change is a constant. There is no standing still for practice areas, firms or the people who run them. When situations change, strengths can become weaknesses, weaknesses that did not matter before can become central, and arrogance based upon past success can become dangerous. It is no longer sufficient for lawyers to be superb specialists in their substantive areas of practice. Clients demand that they also have good: business and management skills; and leadership skills. Always make sure that, whatever you are doing, you are running towards something rather than away from something.
  • Five Reasons Why You Have to Take Charge of Your Development You have already made an enormous investment of time and money in your career. It is up to you to own, manage and develop it. Nobody else will. Change is a constant. There is no standing still for practice areas, firms or the people who run them. When situations change, strengths can become weaknesses, weaknesses that did not matter before can become central, and arrogance based upon past success can become dangerous. It is no longer sufficient for lawyers to be superb specialists in their substantive areas of practice. Clients demand that they also have good: business and management skills; and leadership skills. Always make sure that, whatever you are doing, you are running towards something rather than away from something.
  • Benefits of Purposeful Development Have a better understanding of your self and how you fit into your profession and your life. Empowerment: see your career as something that you own, manage and control. Leverage strengths; manage weaknesses. Set goals and reach them faster (SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-limited). Create new opportunities; engage in ongoing learning Receive objective feedback in a safe and neutral forum. Be held accountable for your development by your coach. Receive ongoing support for the development of your biggest investment – your career. Have a safe, neutral sounding board for your ideas.
  • Components of Executive Development Self assessment (Know thyself!) Honest self-reflection Feedback from colleagues and peers Recognize your values Define your vision Honor your interests Summarize your strengths and challenges Prioritize Plan for maximizing strengths Plan for learning and development of challenge areas Execute the plan Assess on an ongoing basis Celebrate success Start over again: self assessment
  • Components of Executive Development Self assessment (Know thyself!) Honest self-reflection Feedback from colleagues and peers Recognize your values Define your vision Honor your interests Summarize your strengths and challenges Prioritize Plan for maximizing strengths Plan for learning and development of challenge areas Execute the plan Assess on an ongoing basis Celebrate success Start over again: self assessment
  • Components of Executive Development Self assessment (Know thyself!) Honest self-reflection Feedback from colleagues and peers Recognize your values Define your vision Honor your interests Summarize your strengths and challenges Prioritize Plan for maximizing strengths Plan for learning and development of challenge areas Execute the plan Assess on an ongoing basis Celebrate success Start over again: self assessment
  • What are your values? Why values? When setting a goal, it is crucial that you motivate both your mind (what you think you should do) and your heart (what you value). Whether you know it or not, your core values are often evident from your behavior. So it’s better to use them purposefully to manage your actions. What are values? The underlying life principles that you believe are important. Leadership and Values One aspect of effective leadership is the demonstration of your values in pursuit of something you believe in. When your leadership comes from the heart, you present yourself with integrity and authenticity. People will follow your lead when they sense you are authentic and that your integrity is real.
  • Work and Values What passions and motivations drive your working life? What values are most important to you when you think about your career? In what ways does your current job support or fulfill your values? In what ways does your current job detract from your values? What small, immediate actions could you take to help support your values in your current work? What long-term goal can you set to connect your values to your career?
  • Define Your Vision A vision statement is a personal expression that reflects our values through action. Write a vision statement. Techniques: Imagine you were asleep for 3 to 5 years and you wake up. What do you want your life/work/leadership to look like? Imagine that you live to 95 years of age, and die a peaceful death. What would you want your obituary to say? Describe the person or leader you most admire or would like to be most like. How are your values lived out in your vision?
  • What interests you? What do you do just for fun – something for your own enjoyment, without strings attached or responsibility for results? Focus on what gives you energy and joy, not on what other people expect of you or what you think they expect of you. Write down 10 things you love to do. Think about the values that are represented in these activities. What small immediate actions could you take to support your personal passions and your well-being? What long-term goal could you set to support your personal values? You might think that making time for yourself is unnecessary and even selfish but, on the contrary, taking care of yourself is one of the most important gifts you can give to the people who matter to you.
  • Assess Your Strengths and Your Weaknesses The key to professional (and life) success is maximizing strengths and managing weaknesses. Assessing your strengths List things that come naturally to you. Don’t include areas where you think you have developed a skill but have no real natural talent. Include work activities that you consider as fun. Assessing your weaknesses List things that get in the way of your performance, satisfaction with life, etc. Consider how a strength, when maximized, can also become a weakness. Ask others for feedback!
  • Potential Challenges and Development Areas List what you think are your most significant challenges, limitations or areas of growth, taking into account the following: The challenges and/or possibilities that are most likely to lead you to great growth and strength. The challenges and/or possibilities that, if not embraced, may get you into trouble later in your career or life. The ways that these challenges could become a serious handicap to you. The support that you could use in order to overcome the hurdles that you have identified. The most significant change that lies ahead for you in your work or career.
  • Elements of Effective Leadership Development Honest and deliberate assessment Desire to close gap between current and ideal self Clarity about needed changes Clue about how gap can be closed Challenge Opportunity for experimentation and practice Felt need to master the challenge Exposure to different perspectives Support Confidence in ability to learn and grow Positive value placed on change Confirmation and clarification of lessons learned
  • Assessing Leadership Capabilities and Competencies Self awareness Assessment instruments: Myers Briggs Type Indicator, Emotional Intelligence Assessment, performance appraisals, 360 ° tools Informal assessments: Asking friends, colleagues, and family for feedback; observing others’ reactions to your ideas or actions; being repeatedly sought out (or avoided) with regard to certain types of problems or situations; getting unsolicited feedback from your boss
  • The Enemies of Learning Inability to say that we don’t know. Unawareness of the phenomenon of blindness Need to be clear about everything all the time No time Not giving permission to be taught Unwillingness to learn Believing that knowing and learning are the same as having information Feeling like we have to “get it right”
  • Now for the Push: Setting the Goals and Defining the Action Plan You have completed the assessment process. Now what? Based on the platform of your values, vision, interests, and strengths, what capabilities are most critical for success in your career and in your life? In the short term (6-12 months) In the medium term (3-5 years) In the long terms (5 years and beyond)
  • Now for the Push: Setting the Goals and Defining the Action Plan You have completed the assessment process. Now what? Based on the platform of your values, vision, interests, and strengths, what capabilities are most critical for success in your career and in your life? In the short term (6-12 months) In the medium term (3-5 years) In the long terms (5 years and beyond)
  • Goal Setting 101 Criteria for an effective goal Commitment: Am I committed to this? Stretch: Most people work harder when it is something tough to achieve, but it is achievable. Stretch! Performance and monitoring: Increase awareness that progress is being made either through feedback, incremental visible changes or steps, etc. “ SMART” = Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-limited
  • Goal Setting 101 Criteria for an effective goal Commitment: Am I committed to this? Stretch: Most people work harder when it is something tough to achieve, but it is achievable. Stretch! Performance and monitoring: Increase awareness that progress is being made either through feedback, incremental visible changes or steps, etc. “ SMART” = Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-limited
  • Evidence Think about how you will know when you have achieved your goal. What will you be doing differently? What will you be saying? Behavior: I will see myself doing . . . Feedback: I will be hearing from others . . Results: As a result of this goal being achieved, I will see in business, in my work setting, in others . . .
  • Activities, Resources and Strategies Concretely, what will you do; what will you read; what workshops will you attend; what learning opportunities will you engage in? Examples On the job developmental activities and opportunities (e.g., PLI courses, in-house training seminars, etc.) Ask for feedback from others Observe or model others Networking
  • Potential Challenges and Development Areas List what you think are your most significant challenges, limitations or areas of growth, taking into account the following: The challenges and/or possibilities that are most likely to lead you to great growth and strength. The challenges and/or possibilities that, if not embraced, may get you into trouble later in your career or life. The ways that these challenges could become a serious handicap to you. The support that you could use in order to overcome the hurdles that you have identified. The most significant change that lies ahead for you in your work or career.
  • Completion Date Build in specific deadlines. Set a targeted completion date. Do not say “lifelong.” If it is lifelong, break the goal down into measurable and observable components with times and dates.
  • Support Development is hard work! Define the supports that you need to meet the challenge. Who will you count on to support you in making this change? Boss? Spouse, partner, significant other? Co-worker? Friend? Coach? Teacher? Other?
  • Criteria for Selecting a Coach or Mentor Do I trust the person? Is s/he trustworthy? Does s/he listen well (suspend her/his own agenda and attempt to enter my world)? Does s/he ask questions that will move my reflection to a higher level or to a deeper meaning? Does s/he recognize my growth or movement in stages? Does s/he support my growth? Is s/he intimidated by my success? Does s/he give and receive feedback effectively? Does s/he have the expertise, resources and/or networks that I seek in terms of supporting my growth and development? Does s/he have effective interpersonal relationship skills? Does s/he have time? Is s/he comfortable with not knowing and being a partner in the learning journey with me?
  • Celebrations If you achieve this goal, how will you reward yourself or others? Simple is good! Beware of excuses: I don’t do this kind of thing The achievement is reward enough
  • Development Plan Execution Principles In development, be consistent with your overall life and career vision. Your development is YOUR responsibility. Believe in what you are trying to do. The plan is NOT the destination. A developmental opportunity is NOT always a promotion. Development is not automatic. Take time . . . work hard . . . be persistent . . . and endure.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Leadership Development for Lawyers Kathleen Bradley, JD, M.Leadership The Executive Lawyer LLC March, 2009
    • 2. Five Reasons Why YOU Have to Take Charge of Your Development <ul><li>Your career is an investment </li></ul>
    • 3. Five Reasons Why YOU Have to Take Charge of Your Development In today’s world, change is a constant
    • 4. Five Reasons Why YOU Have to Take Charge of Your Development Strengths can become weaknesses
    • 5. Five Reasons Why YOU Have to Take Charge of Your Development Clients demand: business acumen and leadership
    • 6. Five Reasons Why YOU Have to Take Charge of Your Development “ If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.”
    • 7. Benefits of Purposeful Development <ul><li>Understand self </li></ul><ul><li>Empowerment </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage strengths; manage weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Set goals, visualize the path, get there faster </li></ul><ul><li>Create new opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Receptive to feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing learning </li></ul><ul><li>Get support; be held accountable </li></ul>
    • 8. Components of Leadership Development Assess Values Vision Interests Strengths and Challenge
    • 9. Components of Leadership Development Plan and Prioritize
    • 10. Components of Leadership Development <ul><li>Assess </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengths and challenges </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan and Prioritize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SMART Goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Action Steps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Execute </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate </li></ul><ul><li>Start over again </li></ul>
    • 11. What are your values? <ul><li>What are values? </li></ul><ul><li>Why values? </li></ul>
    • 12. Examples of Values Love Power Growth Acceptance Gratefulness Justice Trust Intimacy Health Humor Focus Integrity Honor Beauty Expediency Freedom Comfort Joy Support Honesty Serenity Fulfillment Adventure Service Harmony Kindness Desire Family Truthfulness Inquiry Security Competency Creativity Warmth Balance Humility Success Passion Achievement Winning Appreciation Presence Change Understanding Compassion Play Exercise Vegging Out Pride Romance Frivolity Spontaneity Perfection Appreciation Conscientiousness Wealth Aggressiveness Tenacity Practicality Loyalty
    • 13. Work and Values <ul><li>What drives you? </li></ul><ul><li>What values are important in your work? </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment </li></ul><ul><li>“ Be a Better Leader, Have a Richer Life” article </li></ul>
    • 14. Define Your Vision <ul><li>Values and vision </li></ul><ul><li>Write a vision statement </li></ul>
    • 15. What interests you? <ul><li>Fun </li></ul><ul><li>Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Joy </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment </li></ul><ul><li>Being selfish </li></ul>
    • 16. Assess Your Strengths and Your Weaknesses <ul><li>Key </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Maximize strengths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage weaknesses </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assess strengths </li></ul><ul><li>Identify weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Ask for feedback </li></ul>
    • 17. Gallup’s 34 Talent Areas <ul><li>From Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton, Ph.D. (New York: Free Press, 2001). </li></ul>Achiever Activator Adaptability Analytical Arranger Belief Command Communication Competition Connectedness Consistency Context Deliberative Developer Discipline Empathy Focus Futuristic Harmony Ideation Includer Individualization Input Intellection Learner Maximizer Positivity Relator Responsibility Restorative Self-Assurance Significance Strategic Woo
    • 18. Potential Challenges and Developmental Areas <ul><li>The hurdles to development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Significant challenges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Significant limitations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Areas for growth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What support do you need to manage or overcome these hurdles? </li></ul>
    • 19. Elements of Effective Leadership Development <ul><li>Honest and deliberate assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul>
    • 20. Assessing Leadership Capabilities and Competencies <ul><li>Self awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment instruments </li></ul><ul><li>Informal assessments </li></ul>
    • 21. SIDEBAR: Leadership and Emotional Intelligence <ul><li>What is emotional intelligence (EQ)? </li></ul><ul><li>The ability, capacity, or skill to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions of one’s self, of others, and of groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Relatively new area of leadership research, with evolving focus and definition. </li></ul>
    • 22. Leadership Development and Emotional Intelligence <ul><li>The 5 domains of EQ: </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing your emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Managing your own emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Motivating yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing and understanding other people&apos;s emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Managing relationships, ie., managing the emotions of others </li></ul>
    • 23. Why is EQ important? <ul><li>“ What Makes a Leader”by Daniel Goleman. </li></ul><ul><li>As one progresses through one’s career, EQ plays an increasingly important role in performance. </li></ul><ul><li>Differences in technical skills are of less importance at higher levels of seniority. </li></ul><ul><li>In one study that compared star performers to average ones in senior leadership positions, nearly 90% of their profiles was attributable to EQ factors rather than cognitive abilities. </li></ul>
    • 24. The Johari Window Known to self Unknown to self Known to others Unknown to others open hidden blind unknown
    • 25. Another Sidebar: The Johari Window
    • 26. The Johari Window Known to self Unknown to self Known to others Unknown to others ask (feedback) open hidden blind unknown
    • 27. The Johari Window Known to self Unknown to self Known to others Unknown to others tell (disclosure) ask (feedback) open hidden blind unknown
    • 28. Ability to Learn <ul><li>The ability to learn and openness to learning are the most critical factors in the development process. </li></ul>
    • 29. The Enemies of Learning <ul><li>Inability to say, “I don’t know” </li></ul><ul><li>Blind spots </li></ul><ul><li>Requirement for clarity </li></ul><ul><li>No time </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving permission to be taught </li></ul><ul><li>Unwillingness to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Believing that knowing and learning are the same as having information </li></ul><ul><li>Having to “get it right” </li></ul>
    • 30. Now for the Push: Setting the Goals and Defining the Action Plan <ul><li>Now what? </li></ul><ul><li>Set your goals on the basis of your platform of self-knowledge: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul></ul>
    • 31. Understanding Your Motivation <ul><li>Two key factors in motivation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How much do you value the goal you are moving towards? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Informed by your values, vision, and interests </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How likely is it that you can achieve it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Subjective assessment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Based in part on your perception of your strengths and challenges </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Based also on your perception of your external environment </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 32. Goal Setting 101 <ul><li>Criteria for an effective goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commitment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stretch </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance and monitoring </li></ul></ul>
    • 33. Goal Setting 101 <ul><li>Criteria for an effective goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ SMART” = </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>S pecific </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>M easurable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A chievable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>R ealistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T ime-limited </li></ul></ul>
    • 34. Evidence <ul><ul><li>How will you know when you have achieved your goal? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Behavior </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 35. Activities, Resources and Strategies <ul><li>What will you do? </li></ul><ul><li>What will you read? </li></ul><ul><li>What workshops will you attend? </li></ul><ul><li>What learning opportunities will you engage in? </li></ul><ul><li>What networks will you develop? </li></ul>
    • 36. “ The Making of An Expert” <ul><li>Deliberate practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The things you do well; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The things you can’t do well. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Think deliberately </li></ul><ul><li>Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve the skills you already have </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extend the reach and range of your skills </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Invest time </li></ul><ul><li>Find coaches and mentors </li></ul>
    • 37. Completion Date <ul><li>Deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Targeted completion date </li></ul>
    • 38. Support <ul><li>Development is hard work! </li></ul><ul><li>What supports will you need? </li></ul><ul><li>Who can you engage to support you? </li></ul>
    • 39. Criteria for Selecting a Coach or Mentor <ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Listening ability </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning </li></ul><ul><li>Support growth </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Expertise, resources and/or networks </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal relationship skills </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Comfort level </li></ul>
    • 40. Celebrations <ul><li>Rewarding oneself is important. </li></ul><ul><li>Simple is good! </li></ul><ul><li>No excuses. </li></ul>
    • 41. Development Plan Execution Principles <ul><li>Alignment and consistency </li></ul><ul><li>YOUR responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Believe </li></ul><ul><li>The plan is NOT the destination </li></ul><ul><li>Not always a promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Not automatic </li></ul><ul><li>Take time . . . work hard . . . be persistent . . . and endure </li></ul>
    • 42. Closing Thought <ul><li>“ Knowing others is intelligence ; </li></ul><ul><li>knowing yourself is true wisdom . </li></ul><ul><li>Mastering others is strength ; </li></ul><ul><li>mastering yourself is true power .” </li></ul><ul><li>Tao Te Ching </li></ul>

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