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Reading And Writing Community
 

Reading And Writing Community

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PowerPoint from SRIC/TCARC event on November 14, 2009

PowerPoint from SRIC/TCARC event on November 14, 2009

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  • Include Jessie’s what do you know. . .trivia activity

Reading And Writing Community Reading And Writing Community Presentation Transcript

  • Jen McCarty Plucker, EdD November 14, 2009
    • Do you know these students?
      • Tardy Tracy—isn’t there a clock on your cell phone?
      • Absent Abigail—MIA… a lot.
      • Bobby Belligerent—the answer is always “NO!”
      • Jack Jokester—lots of jokes; often inappropriate
      • Sleepy, Dopey, Droopey… wait, are those dwarves?
      • Sneezy Sally—frequent visits to Nurse Peggy
      • Charlie Charmer—everybody’s buddy
      • Forgetful Fay—no pencil, no notebook, no problem
      • Billy Bladder—suspiciously well-hydrated
      • Celine Cell—so many texts, so little time
      • Messy Melissa—something could be living in that backpack
      • I-could-care-less Chris—surprisingly indifferent about everything
  •  
      • Start the year with a “What do you know…” trivia
        • ex. Are you a true bookworm?
      • Interest surveys—lots out there, no need to recreate
      • Student create “walls”—favorite quotes, fav/least fav words
      • Display student work
      • Popsicle sticks with names—student aid/study hall kid task
      • Exit cards—use scrap paper from your Staff Resource Room
      • Digital conversation—forums and chat rooms on Moodle
      • Share your writing, reading, work, frustrations, successes, etc…
      • Create a class work-time playlist on iTunes
      • Consider a room arrangement not in traditional rows
      • Attendance questions— “Say your name and your favorite…”
      • Name tents—4 corners; each contains a personal detail
      • Team Classroom Management—calendar updates, attendance, collect today’s assignment, entrance cards, b-day calendar…
      • Say cheese! Pictures make it feel like home
      • Birthday calendar—school calendar or get creative
      • Games & Contests
        • Loaded Questions, newspaper puzzles/riddles, trivia games
        • Create teams and keep track of points on a board/poster
        • Free prize idea: “1 extra day” on an assignment coupons
    • . . .on great YA Reads!
    • Classroom Library
      • No money? MCTE, Education MN, local grants. . .
      • Lobby and make a plea to Building and District Leaders.
      • Ask current students to leave their “literacy footprint” by donating a book.
      • Ask community members to donate gift cards to book stores.
      • Hold a B&N or Scholastic Book fair.
    • Book Browse
    • Book Pass
    • First Lines
    • Book Talks
    • Random Reads
    • Get Digital
    • Instead of setting goals for students, they set goals (number of books/super reads)
    • Offer Comfort
    • Model
    • Observe
    • Conference
    • Reward
  •  
    • The three C’s of writer’s workshop
    • Choice
      • give options; not free-for-all
      • select a skill for focus
    • Comfort
      • allow students to move out of traditional seating
      • sit on floor, in corners, under tables, desks etc…
    • Control
      • students choose when and what to publish
    • Choose a personally important topic
    • Go “off topic” or change topic
    • Personalize the writing process
    • Go beyond “cookie-cutter” writing and be free to create your own style
    • Write badly sometimes
    • Find your own voice and take risks
    • Share your writing as you become comfortable
    • Be reflective
    • ~adapted from V. Spandel’s text
    • Actively participate during the entire workshop
    • Work quietly and allow others to do so also.
    • Enjoy the journey you will experience through your writing!
    • Introduce skill/focus for the workshop
    • Explain the task
    • Read a professional and/or teacher model
    • Move to comfortable writing spot and begin
    • Write for 20-30 minutes. . .no stopping!
    • Skill: Descriptive Language; Imagery
    • Task: Write about a place you love
    • Professional Model and/or Teacher Model:
    • 1. All the Places to Love -- P. Maclachlan
    • 2. Ms. Crooker’s Spa Day
    • One of my favorite places to go is the spa! Last week, I treated myself to a day at Coles Salon & Spa in Apple Valley. When I arrived at 9 a.m. for my appointment, I was ushered into a dimly lit room with a warm fireplace. I settled into a leather chair and waited patiently sipping my strong, black Starbuck’s coffee. After just a few minutes, I was taken into another dimly lit room with dark grey walls. There were candles lit and the yellow flames added a warm glow. From overhead came the soft sounds of birds chirping and waves crashing. As I settled onto the massage table, I wrapped myself in a fluffy white blanket and felt my whole body relax as laid on the cushy warm blankets. I relaxed back on a crisp, white pillow. The warmth of the heated massage table radiated through the clean sheets below. Breathing in and out, I noticed the scents of lavender and mint in the air. Both scents cleared my head and made me feel calm.
    •  
    • Once the esthetician began the facial, she positioned a machine near my face that spit out hot steam. It felt a little uncomfortable at first as the steam turned to moisture on my face and it smelled a little musty, but after a while, I got used to the sensation. The esthetician used a fanned paint brush to paint a cold, gooey mask on my skin. It was the color of an avocado.
    • 1. Where are you from? Where did you spend your childhood?
    • 2. Kids expect it to rain, but sometimes it rains too much. Tell about a “rainy day(s)” and how you made it through the rain.
    • 3. “You have beaten everybody who has beaten you.” Share a personal connection and explain what keeps you strong and helps you to overcome a challenging situation?
    •  
    • “ What’s my meaning of a rainy day? Well, my meaning of a rainy day is nobody to talk to like personally. Like nothing to do but wait until something happens. So what I do in these particular times? All I do is do whatever a kid does. Watch movies, play video games, and talk on the computer and wait until someone calls me or something comes up. And that’s my meaning of a rainy day.”
    • “ I have had rainy days, but I had never experienced losing a friend.  That day my friend past away, was the rainiest day I have ever weathered.  At Eastview high school, Amanda Johnstad was known as a cheerful young lady.  She was an amazing girl. She was funny, crazy and she always wanted to dance.  On April first of 2009 everyone had smiles on their faces until they heard what tragedy had just occurred.  Class after class students and teachers were weeping.  Amanda Johnstad passed away in her sleep quietly and peacefully without any pain.  On April 1 st that was the day she left all the people that cared about her.”
    • Jen McCarty Plucker, EdD
    • [email_address]
    • www.jmplucker.blogspot.com