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Yearbook trends su2018

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A view of some yearbook trends in 2018 presented by Bradley Wilson.

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Yearbook trends su2018

  1. 1. YEARBOOK TRENDS What’s new. What’s hip. What’s happenin’ By Bradley Wilson bradleywilson08@gmail.com bradleywilsononline.net @bradleywilson09 ©2018 DO YOU SPEAK GERMAN Despite having difficlty with German grammatical rules, senior Ryan Ayala found that German had it’s easy parts too like conjugating verbs. Ayala had a few reasons why learning this language was important. “My brother had joined the army previously and his first deployment was in Germany so I though it would be nice to learn German,” Ayala said. “Since I already had some knowledge of spanish, learning German was a little bit easy.” Photo byEmily Edwards. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Senior Jessica Jaynes is in her second year of American Sign Language and although she has not met a Deaf person, she still appreciates her knowledge of the language. “I’ve always liked [American Sign Language],” Jaynes said. “I thought it was pretty nifty, because it gives you the opportunity to talk to people you wouldn’t normally talk to without some extra help. The grammer [is the most difficult part]. They put their words backwards and the word order with the time going first and there are different ways to write stuff.” Photo by Emily Edwards. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Junior Hunter Honan is in his second year of American Sign Language. Although somethings can be challenging, having the teacher demonstrate signs has helped him learn the language. “I enjoy [American Sign Language] because learning the new signs is enjoyable,” Honan said. “The glossing is very difficult. Glossing is where you have to capitalize [all the words]. It’s unlike normal writing. It’s very different.“ Photo by Emily Edwards. my language? SEPEDI Knowing two languages can be difficult for students, but junior Moloko Maleka knows four languages: Sepedi, Setswana, English and Setsonga. “Knowing these languages is beneficial if I travel around South Africa to different places, then I can communicate with the people easier,” Maleka said. “I learned Sepedi [and english] at the same time, but I guess I got my training with Sepedi because that’s the language we use at home.” Photo by Morgan Costner. GERMAN Although she has trouble with the pronunciation of German words, senior Hannah Lamb saw German as an option for a foreign language and took it. “I decided to [learn] German because it’s the most interesting language that was available [at University High],” Lamb said. “Pronunciation is hard, because it is a very literal language. You could say bicycle and have 17 adjectives to describe that bicycle.” Photo by Emily Edwards. ITALIAN Online resources, like Youtube and Rosetta Stone coupled with his grandma’s own teaching, aided sophomore Elijah Leon in learning Italian. Leon’s passion for the country moved him to pursue acquiring the language. “I love the country,” Leon said. “I love the cities. I love watching the sports they play there and I am a little bit Italian. The most difficult part [of Italian] is trying to remember some of the different words and phrases that they use and the different accents. The easiest part has been that some of the words are similar to Spanish and English, and so seeing those words that are similar and comparing it is easy to remember them.” Photo by Emily Edwards. SPA und lea the Sp th T [ ARABIC Growing up in a household that spoke both English and Arabic helped junior Sajah Yousef learn to fluently speak Arabic. “I learned [Arabic] and English at the same time,” Yousef said. “I think it’s better to know more languages than one so you can understand things when you go traveling and so you can speak to family. [If you want to learn] I would say get a good teacher.” Photo by Emily Edwards. With three different language courses offered at University High, students had the opportunity to expand not only their knowledge of the world around them, but also the people in it. There are also students like junior Elianeth Alicea who can speak two languages fluently already, but decide to add on one more because they’re interested in learning about various cultures. Alicea fluently speaks English and Spanish, but she is currently learning American Sign Lanaguage. “Knowing more than one language allows you to communicate with different types of people,” Alicea said. “Not only that but it makes you feel like your world gets smaller and smaller the more you get to know and it’s just really fun to get to meet different people from different backgrounds and it’s just really beneficial for onese In addition to being able to meet new people and learn their stories, knowing various languages gives students the chance to t more and not feel like an outsider. “When you know multiple languages it helps you if you leave the country, because then you are more comfortable and you ha somewhat of an idea of what is going on around you,” sophom Adrian Edwards said. “I am trying to learn Spanish so that wh leave the country to visit my family in the Dominican Republ communicate with not only them but the people there.” Story by Emily Edwards BARKING DOGS DON’T BITE I LOVE YOU SO MUCH WORK MAKES LIFE SWEET ELEVATOR CRAZY ALL YOU HAVE TO DECIDE IS WHAT TO DO WITH THE TIME THAT IS GIVEN TO YOU t Life
  2. 2. Orthodoxy: The early years Yearbooks were historical records. Expensive and time-consuming to produce. A production of the “senior class.” A reflection of the times. Little copy.
  3. 3. Agromeck
 North Carolina State University 1903
  4. 4. The evolution Television came into the market. Some color. The ’60s. Journalism.
  5. 5. The journalistic era Journalistic standards took over. Judging standards established. History became priority. PR took second place. Color more common. Organized into sections. Themes. Technology (Macintosh).
  6. 6. The modern era Community standards. Community identity. Population increases and changes. Sales decrease. Self-publishing possible.
  7. 7. “It’s the one tangible thing from high school that you can keep with you, and look back at when you’re older.” Caroline Chengary, editor 2015 Prospect yearbook “With a high school yearbook, all you need 
 to look at it 
 are your two human eyes, 
 and that will stay the same 100 years from now.” 
 Kelvin Miller, corporate vice president, Lifetouch
  8. 8. COVERAGE | unique feature stories, social media COLOR | more; palettes, non-traditional PHOTOJOURNALISM | higher-quality images used large along with numerous smaller images DESIGN | attention to detail, consistency, modeling professional media, lots of white space Trends
  9. 9. COVERAGE Finding stories that serve the mission of the yearbook — to be a historical record of the year. Coverage of issues, beyond people and events. Trends for 2018-2019
  10. 10. Ibis
University of Miami
  11. 11. I LET YOUR JUDGMENT GET TO ME... On a recent visit to outer space, junior Andrew Tripp dove into the unknown. It wasn’t an actual trip to space, but that didn’t undermine the value of the mental journey. He watched documentaries, explored theo- ries, and recreated the universe through art. Space was his getaway. “I like the vastness of space, and how much of it is unexplored,” Tripp said. “I feel like it would be easier to be myself in a place that isn’t as explored, with no biases.” Tripp was in Studio Art class, where one assignment was a self portrait. He drew himself surrounded by stars and planets, in a place where he could be himself, sometimes unlike his reality. “There was a while where my mom wanted me to be this person that I wasn’t, so I had to change who I was based on what my family wanted me to be,” he said. To help his family understand who he was and what he wanted to be, Tripp seized art as his tool. “With art, it gives me an outlet for what I wish I could talk about, because I’m not good at talking about stuff,” he said. “It lets me express different things that are going on in my head in a safe and healthy way, so that I don’t bottle up everything in me and never talk about it.” There was a time when Tripp didn’t use his art as his voice. He locked himself away. He didn’t know how to express who he truly was. After he got started in art, however, there was no going back. “It’s like this weight off of my shoulders,” Tripp said. “I have all these different medi- ums and different ways to express myself that if people don’t understand, that’s fine, because I understand what it means to me.” With this, Tripp realized that not many people outside of his friends knew who he really was. He hoped his self portrait would bring that to light. “With the way I drew the floral shirt I had on, and the space, and the gold around the outside, I wanted to be able to show people who wouldn’t necessarily know me from just seeing me in the hallway or something, that I’m actually kind of a cool person,” Tripp said. “I care about different things and I’m not just like everybody else. I’m my own person.” 386SEPTEMBER 12-16 Sponsored by: Allison Morgan Inc. Page by: J. McKenzie, A . Morgan, E. Cheswick, K. Burgess, C. Cordova, H. Welter BUT IT WILL NOT DEFINE WHO I AM “ I feel like I’m broken. It’s the kind of broken where you feel like you’re in a dream and you’re watching everything through a glass window -- even yourself. For some reason, you’re okay with it, though. You think maybe you’re too weak, or too lazy, or that it protects you. It’s not that you like the way you feel, but you aren’t trying to break that glass.” -Anonymous It takes no more than a tap on a screen. While living in a massively digital generation, it can be easy to judge ourselves. In her seventh grade year, senior Grace Mora struggled with self-image. “When I browse social media, I see all the models,” Mora said. “I [would look] at their bodies and think ‘Wow, I wish I could have this.’” Mora eventually conformed to society’s ideal image: a skinnier figure. “[I thought] I needed to look a certain way,” she said. “I wanted to look perfect when perfect is not really a thing.” After scrunching her diet to achieve that figure, Mora’s self image began to deteriorate. she was diagnosed with an eating disorder and depression. “I was really lucky I didn’t get hospitalized, but I had to work really hard [to recover],” Mora said. After multiple trainings, Mora’s self image strengthened. She got a tattoo on her sixteenth birthday of a semicolon in recognition of the the SUICIDE HOTLINE: 1-800-273-8255 SEXUAL ASSAULT: 1-800-656-4673 Going on walks, taking bike rides, having yard sales: these were the simple ways in which sophomore Kennedy Smith spent time with her stepmother, the woman who had raised her since she was two. In October 2017, Smith’s stepmother committed suicide. “People aren’t aware of how [suicide will] affect your family,” Smith said, “The last time I saw her we were in the car and she was crying and telling me how bad it was, but I didn’t know it was that bad.” “ Google had to break the news to me that I was molested. [I’ve been] sexually assaulted by a stranger, emotionally and physically abused by a family member, and have developed mental illnesses. I get sick maybe thrice a year, but my brain is still coughing from the cold I had seven years ago. Though I have been through a bit, my battles make me stronger and who I am. I am a survivor.” -Anonymous 47 in 50STUDENTS SAID SOMEONE ELSE STUDENTS PORTRAY THEMSELVES DIFFERENTLY ONLINE THAN IN REAL LIFE 1 in 2 8 in 25STUDENTS AREN’T COMFORTABLE IN THEIR OWN SKIN Out of 167 votes via Twitter poll Out of 225 votes via Twitter poll Out of 160 votes via Twitter poll STUDENTS WISH THEY COULD BE SOMEONE ELSE Out of 169 votes via Twitter poll T. Hicks M. Harding O. Haun Project Semicolon, an organization intended to uplift mental health. “It represents how your life could have ended, but it didn’t, like how an author uses a semicolon to keep things going,” Mora said. She made an agreement with herself to appreciate who she truly is, regardless of social prefer- ences. Such a small mark fueled a tremendous impact on Mora. “When I question my self image,” she said, “I just remind myself that if I looked any other way, it wouldn’t be me.” 1 in 3 63SELF IMAGE Sponsored by: Taco Bell Page by: E. Cheswick, A. DiCea, C. Dean, E. Kelly, I. Bupp, M. Cafasso, O. Bradish, W. Hicks, J. Crowley HAS MADE THEM FEEL SELF CONSCIOUS
  12. 12. 42 Student Life one step at a time Story by Grace Rooney 43Healthy Choices- Dealing with Stress HANDLING EVERYDAY STRESS “When we see different students all over social media that we tell ourselves are “better” than us, both physically and mentally, WE BECOME SCARED that maybe other people may judge us because we look different than those who we look at in a more superior viewpoint, and that can cause these feelings of depression and anxiety,” junior Naomi Hernandez said. Pressureespecially when you’re suffering in silence “I FACE ANXIETY because I do a lot of other things than just school and juggling it all while doing it all to perfection is A CHALLENGE AND CAN BECOME OVERBEARING,” junior Vivian Diaz said. “MATH CLASS GIVES ME THE MOST ANXIETY, BECAUSE IT’S HARD, AND I DON’T ALWAYS HAVE THE BEST GRADES,” JUNIOR MARTIN KOUADJO SAID. It’s not easy to handle; you have a lot to deal with in school A rapid heart rate, difficult breaths and a sense of dire panic: Cases where students faced only brief moments of anxiety before a test or completing last minute assignments were just as valid as instances where students found themselves seeking out help to deal with seemingly uncontrollable and overwhelming feelings. With each passing day, it seemed as though these issues have become a rising problem among adolescents, especially with the everyday pressures they could face on a school campus. Principal intern John DeVito said that as an administrator, he often dealt with student anxiety and depression. “Because of my position dealing with grades and graduation requirements, and dealing with the counselors closely, [mental health] is something that does come up regularly where kids are stressed about workloads,” DeVito said. As students progressed through high school, even the uncertainty of whether or not they will be promoted to the next grade level could cause stress. Students often disclosed information with DeVito, where he would recommend them to talk to a trusted friend or a professional. “There is a protocol depending on what the student says or what they’re feeling that kind of leads [the counselors] in a certain direction to get the student help. Most of the time it ends in a parent phone call and making the parents aware and giving them options.” Along with doctor diagnosed cases of a mental disorder came students who found themselves facing the confusion, shame, and denial that often comes with a self-diagnosis. “I think a lot of students at UHS consider themselves to have a mental health problem, this school comes with a lot of pressure and responsibilities,” sophomore Brianna Diehl said. “High school gets to people, I can speak from experience. Going from middle school to here was rough, and it could take a big toll on someone if they were not mentally prepared.” Having a stressful family life could pile on more weight to an already overwhelming school life. Junior Lathan Schefer had six siblings at home and had to take care of them before he can do his own homework, including AP classes. His siblings’ ages varied, making it harder to deal with them all at once. “Just taking care of [my siblings], making sure they get their homework done, getting them ready for bed - by the time I get all that done and it is time for me to do homework, I am already really tired,” Schefer said. Setting long and short term goals, whether it be academic or to improve overall health, was something that might have helped keep things from going completely off the rails. However, when a student found themselves not making progress towards their goals, it may have appeared as if they were beyond reach. This took a toll on the students happiness on and off campus. “Dealing with mental issues is always extremely difficult, especially when you’re suffering in silence,” senior Caitlyn Spaulding said. “I’ve seen my anxiety take a direct toll on how I perform academically in school and socially within my friendships.” Learning to deal with stress and anxiety in high school taught students important life-long lessons. First being, that it is okay to struggle and that it is normal. Life can be overwhelming and come with quite a bit of pressure, especially as a teenager in high school. However, not talking about these feelings had the possibility of leading into something much worse. “School gives me the most stress, I tend to bottle it up, then it all kind of explodes,” freshmen Danielle Kushman said. “It usually happens after I get bad grades, it is usually the little things. I think there is more pressure on teens nowadays, higher expectations for college, grades, and big stuff that wasn’t as relevant then as it is now.” Students like senior Ean Brockington have seen firsthand how cases of anxiety and depression could drastically impact their friends’ lives. “I’ve seen anxiety make my friends dropout of high school this year,” Brockington said. “Their life got affected because they stopped trying because their depression and anxiety got in the way of them putting in the work needed for them to graduate and so they just gave up.” Even for those who have not yet reached their tipping point, a list of to-do’s can quickly add up when their hefty schedules caught up with them. As a high school student, college student, and football player, junior Thomas Schiffman was forced to push through his hardships. “I am in dual enrollment right now. Having seven classes here [at University], then going for dual enrollment after school,” Schiffman said. “Then dealing with football and workouts throughout the entire year, it builds up stress.” Another dual-enrolled student, junior Ayanna Castro, who had 10 classes, seven at University high and three at Daytona State college in addition to her job, understood what constantly bringing stress upon herself can feel like. “[Basically] I am stressing myself out because of school,” Castro said. However, she has found a way to motivate herself to push forward. “I handle my schedule because I am motivated to be the best version of myself that I can be.” Between upholding a steady social life, maintaining good grades, and dealing with family, many students found themselves with pent-up anxiety or sadness. STUDENTS COPED WITH THE STRESS THEY FACED IN AND OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL “WE JUST KEEP IT ALL INSIDE, ONE DAY YOU’RE [GOING TO] EXPLODE.It’s not easy to handle you have a lot to deal with in school, then you go home. It’s not easy being a senior, or being a student in general in high school, and trying to plan out your future,” senior Heckmil Dejesus.
  13. 13. Corning-Painted Post HS13975Corning-Painted Post HS13975 Special Instructions HJ Template 9 66 Job # School Special Instructions HJ Template 9 67 Job # School talk ABOUT WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT Reporting by Olivia Johnson and Karleigh Corliss There’sHELP HERE FOR YOU let’s talk MENTAL HEALTH 66-67Design by Olivia Johnson Who can students go to for help in this building? “In this building, we have three social workers and one psychologist. A lot of times, I get my referrals to speak to students through an assistant principal or through a teacher who says, ‘I think there’s a student who’s “ Superintendent Michael Ginalski our job is to educate the whole child, and if we are not helping students with issues surrounding their own mental health, it’s unlikely they will reach their full ACADEMIC potential. There is still that notion that mental health issues are either not legitimate or can easily be overcome, and because of that, OUR endgame IS to create a safe, nurturing environment where students can access help. I am looking forward to an aggressive effort to help students more intently, BEGINNING at the elementary level. I believe that will make a major difference.” School psychologist James Scouten has one message for the student body—there are mental health professionals in the school, and they want to help you In a survey conducted by Florida’s Teen Treatment Center, it was found that one out of five adolescents has a mental health disorder, yet only 50% of those adolescents get the help that they need. With C- PPHS personnel reporting more teenagers in need than ever before, some students are finding strength in sharing their stories and educating the community about the realities of living with mental illness struggling.’ I also try to get my name out there so that students know they can just stop down when they need to, and I do get a fair amount of drop-ins, maybe one to two per week.” What kinds of issues do people visit you to talk about? “The most prominent ones are the ones we see across the globe, which are anxiety and depression. People across cultures are anxious and depressed, and as many as 77% of us will qualify for a clinical level of anxiety and depression at some point in our lives. Not that it would be enduring or last forever, but we go through periods of difficulty, so that’s what we see most. And around anxiety and depression is general high levels of stress— academic stress, relationship stress, social media stress—we get a lot of that, too.” What techniques can people use to get on a better path if they’re struggling with mental health? “This is what psychotherapy is all about. It’s about teaching people strategies that help them when they’re depressed or anxious or having some other type of mental health symptomatology. The first thing you do is you find someone with the training, and you talk to them. Then, that person will figure out, specifically, what the issue is when it comes to the individual, and that’s when the problem- solving begins.” How can people help themselves in dealing with stress in their daily lIVES? “It depends on the person, of course. I start with asking people, ‘Why are you doing this to yourself right now?’ There’s always the time management stuff and making sure that you’re having a healthy response to your stress, getting enough sleep, making sure that your nutrition and hydration are correct, and you get the help that is available to you if you are feeling overwhelmed.” It’s everywhere—Snapchat news stories, Hawk Day speakers, Netflix series—they’re all quick to broadcast it: ‘DEPRESSION IS RISING,’ ‘TEENS ARE AT RISK.’ Characters like Hannah Baker in ‘13 Reasons Why’ familiarized their fans with mental illnesses, but it’s closer than a fictional high school in Northern California. Freshman Jane Smith*, sophomore DaisyMay Watkins, junior Meghan Mullaney, and senior Danielle Butler have all faced their own battles with mental illness. With the school district’s creation of the Student Mental Health Action Committee in the fall, the four students opened up about their struggles and the need to talk more about mental illness. “Ever since I was a kid, I was paranoid and anxious. I didn’t understand how people could leave their house without feeling scared. I realized that there was an actual name for what the issue was. I have general anxiety, depression, and paranoia,” Smith said. Similar to Smith, Mullaney’s illness stems from her childhood. “I have PTSD because I was molested twice when I was younger,” Mullaney said. “I’m in foster care because of that. I look like I’m always happy, but my anxiety jumps sometimes and makes everything hard.” Watkins shared that she faces issues with anxiety as well. “It recently came up again, 20 times worse. I have depression, too, and depression isn’t just the drastic stuff. It’s walking in the hallway and feeling completely empty like you’re completely numb. I just wanted to lay here until I rotted away, and I attempted suicide on multiple occasions,” Watkins said. According to Butler, her own depression grew due to an ongoing relationship she described as abusive. “My sophomore year of high school, I was really depressed,” Butler said. “Part of what brought that on was the extremely unhealthy relationship that I was in. What my ex-boyfriend did to me amplified how depressed I was feeling before.” In spite of their dark days, the girls found the will to overcome, open up, and reach out for help. “I realized I was in an abusive relationship when I wanted to end my life because I thought my boyfriend didn’t love me,” Butler said. “After I realized how toxic the situation was, I had great friends and my mom that helped me. I ended up going to counseling, and my ex-boyfriend and I ended things. That was the best summer of my life. I found myself again.” “I went to Robert Packer Hospital in the Behavioral Science Unit,” Mullaney said. “It’s really helpful going there. It’s quiet, and it’s just very beneficial. Since I’ve gotten the help I need, I’m more positive in life, and I learned to not only care about other people, but myself, too.” Through finding the help they needed, they overcame the depths of their illnesses. They became survivors, ready to pass on advice and support others. “I’ve been trying to set it up so I can speak at a Hawk Day,” Mullaney said. “If I could just save one more life, that’s incredible. My words as a high school student struggling with the same thing that a lot of other people struggle with can let them know that they’re not alone.” “If I saw someone in a relationship as toxic as the one I was in, I would not hold back. I would talk to an adult, a guidance counselor, a psychologist, anyone. It’s so important to speak out. You could save someone’s life,” Butler said. “Speaking up is the best thing you could do because a voice has so much more power than a hunch or standing back in the sidelines. Talking about issues like this is how we fix them.” Smith agreed, suggesting that best way to help those who are struggling is by showing empathy. “Even if someone doesn’t really understand—because a lot of the things that I do just don’t really make sense to people—don’t get mad about it. Be accepting,” Smith said. “Don’t put them down or make them feel bad because they couldn’t do something or couldn’t come to the party. You want to just be like, ‘It’s OK,’ and be compassionate and empathetic.” Students who need to talk with someone or think a friend is in need of help can visit the Guidance Office in the Commons or visit an assistant principal at any time. Counselors and administrators can then connect students with the best resources available for support. Dr. James Scouten, School Psychologist *’Jane Smith’ is a pseudonym; the student asked to remain anonymous.
  14. 14. 209Page No.Job No.: 044780 Page No.Job No.: 044780208 208 in OURSELVES | Spread Design by Name Name “Nikki and Kendal are super positive impacts in my life. They are always so compassionate, and they work so hard for everything, and that’s very admirable.” Kathryn Revelle, 12208 in OURSELVES | in Our Own Words by Nikki Lyssy and Kendal Lyssy Dear Student Body, As this amazing school year draws to a close and we prepare to graduate and move forward, we would be remiss if we didn’t take the time to thank all of you. At the beginning of freshman year, we were truly scared and had no idea what to expect. Navigating Westlake High School without sight was nerve-racking and something we weren’t sure we were ready for. We worried that our blindness might cause us to be viewed differently. However, we could not have been more wrong. From the moment we stepped through the doors of the freshman center, we felt a sense of energy and excite- ment, a crackling in the air. This was a new adventure, and all of you immedi- ately accepted us without question. You wanted to get to know us. You wanted to befriend us, and you wanted to learn more about navigating the world in darkness. So many of you have asked us questions like “Can you see anything?” and “How long have you been blind?” and these questions were always ones we were more than happy to answer. Your curiosity and hunger for knowledge on a subject which you might not have had experience with before made us feel spe- cial instead of different, and we can never repay you or say thank you enough. Thank you so much for always lending your helping hand to us. Many of you have been in choir with us the past four years and have had a huge impact on our success. Whether it was dancing in Shrek the Musical and ensur- ing our safety on stage at all times or making sure we never missed our cues during concerts, each and every one of you allowed us to blend in effortlessly, and we always fit in on stage. After we left Mo Ranch freshman year, exhausted from a weekend of bonding and fun, we agreed that Westlake seemed much smaller because we had had the opportunity to bond with so many of you. To this day, the countless Circle shoutouts make us emotional, and the time each of you have taken to get to know us has been invaluable. Our high school expe- rience would have been very different if not for the family choir provided us, and each and every one of you helped contribute to making it the best time of our lives. Beyond choir, the little things you did to make us feel spectacular were truly incredible. We would approach random tables in the Chap Court or courtyard looking for a place to eat, and were always, without fail, invited to sit down, even if we’d never met before. You would so selflessly jump in to rescue us when we were swirling in a sea of confusion and uncertainty, trying to find our way. You accepted tardies to your own classes when you trekked out of your way to help us find ours and never complained but always smiled instead. You have been our friends for four years, and we could not have been luckier to share this jour- ney with you. We are so appreciative of everything you do to make us fit in and feel com- fortable. Each of you has made a huge impact on our lives, and we will never forget you. We wish you all well in your futures, and know you will be so success- ful wherever you choose to go next. We can’t wait to see where life leads you all, and we hope you will always remember the everlasting bond we feel with all of you. People always told us high school was going to be the best time of our lives, and they were right; however, we can’t fathom what it would have been like without a student body as dedicated, beautiful and accepting as you. We can’t find enough words to express our gratitude and feel honored that we had the opportunity to be one of you. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts; we will never forget you. Love, Nikki and Kendal Lyssy Twins seize the opportunity to show their appreciation for classmates BODY dear STUDENT
  15. 15. COVERAGE Social media and technology Trends for 2018-2019
  16. 16. Popular brands on Twitter include Starbucks, Apple and Victoria’s Secret. As of spring 2018, the most popular Twitter account was @Katyperry, who had amassed more than 
 108 million followers. Number of Twitter users in the United States as of first quarter 2018 • Statista
  17. 17. 6,000 TWEETS ARE SENT EVERY SECOND, ABOUT 350,000 EVERY MINUTE, ABOUT 200 BILLION PER YEAR. TWITTER USAGE STATISTIC http://www.internetlivestats.com/twitter-statistics/
  18. 18. THAT’S A LOT OF TWEETSHTTP://WWW.INTERNETLIVESTATS.COM/ONE-SECOND/#TWEETS-BAND
  19. 19. IDEA TWEET A PHOTO A DAY
  20. 20. IDEA PROMOTE PHOTO SALES ON SMUG MUG
  21. 21. - iPhone 6 I was interested in computers so I applied for an internship. It took a lot of work emailing three Roseville managers, talking in interviews and taking AP Computer Science. But I eventually got the job! We hear you worked at the Apple store. How did you land the job? What did you do on the job? I worked at the Genius Bar and helped people back up their computer and fix tech problems. Alana Madamba Double tap Picture this iMessage (28) Once the 2:40 bell rang indicating school was over, students participate in after school sports, drive or walk home, or walk to the Stanford Ranch and Park complex. Convenience with Starbucks, The Pizza Place, CVS, and Tops Yogurt the high school students utilized this area to hang out. At The Pizza Place, Jake Danna, Jessica Valverde and Ellie Russ gather before a game. “I was on snapchat while Jake was in the background and photobombed my picture. When I saw the picture I started laughing,” Jessica said. A look into student instagrams Instagram @quinnhailey (Quinn Moore) liked your photo @Browntiger97 (Nick Ramos) retweeted your post Ryan Kostecki wants you to play Farmville with them. Alexis Brown, it’s time for your photoshoot at Metropolitan Magazine. Missed Call (6) I have an iPhone 4 right now and I’m not interested in getting the new iPhone 6 because its too big. I would switch to an Android HTC One M8. The iPhone 6 is way too big! It’s crazy, I know my dad’s friend waited in line for it. I’d rather get a Galaxy S5, but I love my iPhone 5. I wouldn’t mind having the new iPhone 6 but I’m really happy with my iPhone. I have the 5C right now. The iPhone 6 is too big and it bends. I love my Galaxy S3 but the Galaxy S5 is much nicer than the iPhone 6. My aunt waited in line for the new iPhone 6 for me. I like how it’s curved and how the phone fits in your hand. I heard that the iPhone 6 is bendy. I not really a big fan of Apple’s phones. The Galaxy S5 looks much more appealing. I think the iPhone 6 is too big, like a mini tablet. Even though I have an Android Centura, I’d rather get the iPhone 5S or iPhone 5C. The bigger the better! I think the iPhone 6 is pretty cool. I’d trade my iPhone 5C to the iPhone 6. by Nick DiSandro by Presten Manley by Amy Burger by Kurtis Koch by Alex Baur by Vinn Fernando by Patrick Craighhead by Hunter Boberg Twitter Facebook Kim K Game Jeremy Fokes iPhone 5 is the best Love my iPhone Content with my iPhone 4 Galaxy is the nicer phone The 6 is awesome I heard it bends It’s too big Bigger is better Kim K f Android vs. iPhone Customer Review Jaskirat Hothi, Apple lady On September 19, Apple introduced their biggest and thinnest phones yet to compete with other flagship smartphones. Expanding from the iPhone 5s and 5c’s 4-inch display screen, Apple released the iPhone 6 with a 4.7 inch screen and the iPhone 6 Plus with a 5.5 inch screen. The new iPhone 6 was now thinner than ever and it also sports a new retina display with 326 pixels per inch, while its counterpart the 6 plus garners 401 pixels per inch. 1. Before a win over Whitney, Marissa Gurnaby and Hayley Smith pose. 2. Visiting Southern California, Erica Sublette goes to the beach in Carlsbad. 3. On the beach, Kelly Whalen, Mia Klemin, Derek Johnson and Adam Caron were at Point Reyes. 4. Posing by flowers, Kylie Chan visits San Francisco. 5. On their first date, Kaitlyn Clouse and Kyle Grant went to Hidden Falls. 6. Getting ready to go to Quarry Bowl, Nikole Geide, Hana Baig and Sienna Knorzer. 7. Celebrating Kayla’s birthday, Nina Gioiosa and Kayla Dahla enjoy the beach. 8. Asking with a poster, Luis Lizzaraga asked Maddy Hennessey to Homecoming. 9. At Junior float construction, Emily Masnica, Xan Mabry, Nico Studen, Bonnie Chiu, and Justin Walberg prepare for Homecoming. 10. At the Auburn fair, Emily Lemos played tug-a-war with Grant Politz. 11. Posing with her brother Trevor, Holly Petersen enjoyed the pumpkin patch. 12. On a camping trip, Lexi Shusterove, Isabel Goodman and Rylee Primavera. 1 2 Rebecca Stanley Rachel Shirhall September 36 Karissa Newberry
  22. 22. Legend, William R. Boone High School (Orlando, Fla.)
  23. 23. Trends for 2018-2019 COVERAGE What is the best way to tell the story? Bring world events into the coverage. Diversity reflects school and community.
  24. 24. DO YOU SPEAK GERMAN Despite having difficlty with German grammatical rules, senior Ryan Ayala found that German had it’s easy parts too like conjugating verbs. Ayala had a few reasons why learning this language was important. “My brother had joined the army previously and his first deployment was in Germany so I though it would be nice to learn German,” Ayala said. “Since I already had some knowledge of spanish, learning German was a little bit easy.” Photo byEmily Edwards. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Senior Jessica Jaynes is in her second year of American Sign Language and although she has not met a Deaf person, she still appreciates her knowledge of the language. “I’ve always liked [American Sign Language],” Jaynes said. “I thought it was pretty nifty, because it gives you the opportunity to talk to people you wouldn’t normally talk to without some extra help. The grammer [is the most difficult part]. They put their words backwards and the word order with the time going first and there are different ways to write stuff.” Photo by Emily Edwards. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Junior Hunter Honan is in his second year of American Sign Language. Although somethings can be challenging, having the teacher demonstrate signs has helped him learn the language. “I enjoy [American Sign Language] because learning the new signs is enjoyable,” Honan said. “The glossing is very difficult. Glossing is where you have to capitalize [all the words]. It’s unlike normal writing. It’s very different.“ Photo by Emily Edwards. my language? SEPEDI Knowing two languages can be difficult for students, but junior Moloko Maleka knows four languages: Sepedi, Setswana, English and Setsonga. “Knowing these languages is beneficial if I travel around South Africa to different places, then I can communicate with the people easier,” Maleka said. “I learned Sepedi [and english] at the same time, but I guess I got my training with Sepedi because that’s the language we use at home.” Photo by Morgan Costner. GERMAN Although she has trouble with the pronunciation of German words, senior Hannah Lamb saw German as an option for a foreign language and took it. “I decided to [learn] German because it’s the most interesting language that was available [at University High],” Lamb said. “Pronunciation is hard, because it is a very literal language. You could say bicycle and have 17 adjectives to describe that bicycle.” Photo by Emily Edwards. ITALIAN Online resources, like Youtube and Rosetta Stone coupled with his grandma’s own teaching, aided sophomore Elijah Leon in learning Italian. Leon’s passion for the country moved him to pursue acquiring the language. “I love the country,” Leon said. “I love the cities. I love watching the sports they play there and I am a little bit Italian. The most difficult part [of Italian] is trying to remember some of the different words and phrases that they use and the different accents. The easiest part has been that some of the words are similar to Spanish and English, and so seeing those words that are similar and comparing it is easy to remember them.” Photo by Emily Edwards. SPANISH Freshman Cristal Tejeda-Castro understands that while it can be hard to learn Spanish, it can benefit you to know the language, especially for the future. “In Spanish one word can mean a lot of other things and people can really get confused,” Tejedacastro said. “I want to learn the history [of Spanish] because I speak it and my family speaks it and here around school, so I really want to know where it came from and how it developed. I recommend others to learn Spanish to learn new things and in the future while you’re getting a job you will be more recommended and have more opportunities because you speak two languages.” Photo by Emily Edwards. ARABIC Growing up in a household that spoke both English and Arabic helped junior Sajah Yousef learn to fluently speak Arabic. “I learned [Arabic] and English at the same time,” Yousef said. “I think it’s better to know more languages than one so you can understand things when you go traveling and so you can speak to family. [If you want to learn] I would say get a good teacher.” Photo by Emily Edwards. With three different language courses offered at University High, students had the opportunity to expand not only their knowledge of the world around them, but also the people in it. There are also students like junior Elianeth Alicea who can speak two languages fluently already, but decide to add on one more because they’re interested in learning about various cultures. Alicea fluently speaks English and Spanish, but she is currently learning American Sign Lanaguage. “Knowing more than one language allows you to communicate with different types of people,” Alicea said. “Not only that but it makes you feel like your world gets smaller and smaller the more you get to know and it’s just really fun to get to meet different people from different backgrounds and it’s just really beneficial for oneself.” In addition to being able to meet new people and learn their stories, knowing various languages gives students the chance to travel more and not feel like an outsider. “When you know multiple languages it helps you if you leave the country, because then you are more comfortable and you have somewhat of an idea of what is going on around you,” sophomore Adrian Edwards said. “I am trying to learn Spanish so that when I leave the country to visit my family in the Dominican Republic, I can communicate with not only them but the people there.” Story by Emily Edwards BARKING DOGS DON’T BITE I LOVE YOU SO MUCH WORK MAKES LIFE SWEET ELEVATOR CRAZYALL YOU HAVE TO DECIDE IS WHAT TO DO WITH THE TIME THAT IS GIVEN TO YOU 78 79Languages Around CampusAcademics & Student Life
  25. 25. Chopitlike “It’s Capri salad, and it has tomatoes and mozzarella cheese, but it has stuff in the cheese,” senior Yahaira Torres said. Photo by Morgan Costner. “The square sandwiches are tuna, the chicken the circle one’s, and tuna should also be tuna,” senior Samantha Corado said. “The garnishes are radish with olives the other one has cilantro with tomato and the other is a pepper,” Photo by Morgan Costner. ONE MAN SHOW With great care, junior Dean Revlett unpacks the food for the debutante tea. Revlett was ecstatic to present their creations to the personalities attending. “My favorite part about catering events is meeting different people and meeting a bunch of old people who are nice to me,” Revlett said. Photo by Morgan Costner. CULINARY STUDENTS PREPARED FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOR A DEBUTANTE TEA Tying their aprons, culinary students prepared to serve the guests at the debutante tea. Food was placed on platters and the tea and coffee brewed for the debutante tea. “The event was a debutante tea,” chef Amber Van Mansfeild said. “It wasn’t their coming out party. They were already debutantes, they had already gone to college and they came back and had a big tea for them. It was a ceremony where they were being bestowed some honor and we were lucky to be apart of that.” Prior to the event, students prepared themselves and their food, in order to promote a positive first impression of their uniforms and work ethic. “Before we went there, we had to prepare all the food,” senior Selena Wollins said. “We had to make the food then set it up on trays so when we got there we can place it all out.” Despite the extravagance in the air, the students kept their heads on straight, and treated it like a normal day. “Everyone was socializing and having smiles on their face,” junior Dean Revlett said. “It was bright and in a home where it’s cozy.” IT’S HOT THREE MUSKETEERS To set up in time for the debutante tea, senior Bry’nesha Seymore, senior Angelis Loperena and junior Selena Wolins work together. The platters they prepared were stunning on the tables of the debutante tea. “I love seeing how our overall finished product and our hard work paid off,” Loperena said. Photo by Morgan Costner. 60 61CulinaryAcademics & Clubs Story by Morgan Costner FINAL TOUCH Working to make everything presentable senior Carlos Negron and chef Amber Van Mansfeld make last minute changes. The details of the dish came together in a way that was more than satisfactory. “I joined the culinary club because of my passion for cooking and the excitement of different cuisines,” Negron said. Photo by Morgan Costner.
  26. 26. a little thing that means a lot to me is... “My photo album because it reminds me of all the places I’ve been and lived.” Austen Berry ‘17 065DESIGNER melissagoni academics & organizations FLYERS FLYERS as seen on “My favorite part about being in [Pink Ladies] is being with my friends and meeting new people.” Hnin Thuzar ‘17 “FBLA’s goal is to prepare young adults to become emerging leaders and entrepreneurs.” Karim Sharif ‘15 “The Anime & Manga Club is a place where anyone who loves anime can meet other anime fans and explore more anime.” Maryann Batiste ‘18 “We raise money for autism speaks, for future research on the disability.” Gracelyn Watkins ‘18 “There are [Smash Club] tournaments, so it adds a level of competition that I enjoy. Plus, it’s just really fun to play the game with other people.” Joseph Morris ‘15 “The purpose of the club is to raise awareness.” Edward Chen ‘18 “We sold 60 churros in the 60 minutes we had for each. We [the Grizzly Food Bank] plan to donate to the Placer Food Bank in order to support their local community gardens.” Philip Canete ‘16 Don’T TExT anD DRivE To raise awareness, Business Concepts students put up posters on classroom doors around the campus to remind students not to text and drive. (1st door: Mr. Anthony Davis, 2nd door: Mr. John Thomas, 3rd door: Ms. Lisa Goldsmith) “In rehearsal, [Comedy Night] was kind of shaky, but once we had the night of opening, everyone just came together and it went really well. No one missed a line.” Madilynn Hintz ‘15 “I like the environment [the Soccer Freestyling Club]. It’s really athletic and it’s a great workout. We do a lot of combinations.” Ricky Gudino ‘15 “My favorite part of the [IB] festival was participating in the Filipino dance and pulling it off last minute.” Chloie Flores ‘18
  27. 27. PHOTOJOURNALISM Continued use of high-quality, large images. Trends for 2018-2019
  28. 28. 1 / LISTEN HERE, JULIAN / Discussing the musical within the musical, Maggie Jones, played by senior Darrian Jensen, Bert Barry, played by senior Shane Smith and Julian Marsh, played by senior Logan Westbrooks, talk about the auditions for Marsh’s play, “Pretty Lady.” Jensen began learning tap dancing this summer to prepare for the show. “Adding the tap dancing element made the musical more difficult, but it turned out to be so much fun with all the company,” Jensen said. Photo by Ammysadday Hernandez 2 / ONE STEP, TWO STEP / Dancing in line, Peggy Sawyer, Lorraine Fleming and Phyllis Dale, played by juniors Katy White, Lauren Jordan and Hannah Hightshoe join in step with Ann Reily, played by senior Celina Bradley. “Learning the routines was very motivating for me,” Jordan said. “It made me feel like I could conquer the world.” Photo by Hayley Bridges 3 / BREATHTAKING / Lip-locked with Peggy Sawyer, played by Katy White, Julian Marsh played by Logan Westbrooks calms down Sawyer before her first solo in “Pretty Lady.” “It wasn’t as awkward as you would think,” White said. “We grew pretty close way before we even had to do any kissing on stage. The only awkward part was the casts’ reaction when they saw it for the first time during production week.” Photo by Cemal Qureshi OF THE SHADOWS 3 OUT 4 / SASSY SNAPS / Maggie Jones, played by senior Darrian Jensen, snaps her way out of the dressing room curtain for her solo in “42nd Street.” “I really had fun immersing myself into my character, and I completely fell in love with her,” Jensen said. “Maggie’s outgoing personality is very similar to mine. We are one in the same.” Photo by Hayley Bridges 5 / SILENT PEP TALKS / Moments before the school showing Jan. 30, sophomore Haley Clark gives herself a silent pep talk before going on stage. “I wasn’t as nervous as I thought I would have been,” Clark said. “I always give myself a little pep talk to boost up my energy.” Photo by Hayley Bridges 2 3 1 0 9 1 WINTER FINE ARTS “42ND STREET” PRODUCTION 0 9 0 54 IT IS “EMPOWERING.” LAUREN JORDAN, 11 A NEW IDENTITY/ Performing the part of a prima donna, junior Marissa Suazo plays Dorothy Brock, a stereotypical, sassy and temperamental movie star who has to have everything her way. “Dorothy Brock was the most challenging character I’ve ever played,” Suazo said. “It took a lot of rehearsal to create a believable character that was different from whom I am as a person.” Photo by Hayley Bridges A s the lights dimmed, silence overtook the auditorium in anticipation of the opening night performance Jan. 31 of “42nd Street.” The musical took months of preparation and combined the efforts of the entire fine arts department. Backstage, cast members applied the finishing touch-ups on their makeup, and the crew scrambled to finalize all the props and set pieces created by tech theatre and art students. “Getting everything ready before opening night and then changing the sets and props was really quick and became a little hectic, but I think it was all good because we practiced before, did things within a time frame and everyone helped each other out,” junior Karina Guzman said. Meanwhile, band students in the orchestra previewed the music in the show with “Overture” as cast members quickly took their places behind the curtain. “Having the opportunity to play with the orchestra as a freshman was hard and challenging at first, but as I got help from Mr. Hull and some upperclassmen it became easier,” freshman Marco Munoz said. “I plan on continuing to play with the orchestra every year of high school because the experience made me a much better player.” From learning the basics to perfecting a triple-time step, cast members of the musical also spent countless hours perfecting the art of tap so that the production of “42nd Street” would be authentic for the audience and the Betty Buckley Awards judges. “The hours we spent on learning how to tap dance were very intense,” sophomore Skyler Martin said. “ We practically started right after the “To Kill a Mockingbird” production, and the tap rehearsals after school became more often in December.” After months of memorizing lines, practicing music, learning how to tap and constructing the set, the curtain rose for opening night. “The lights, the darkness, the sounds and the silence are all part of the excitement of being in the musical,” junior Long Ho said. “Tears and sweat go into it for a long time, and it’s really sad when it disappears within a week and all that is left are memories and photos.” Story by Cemal Qureshi THEATRE STUDENTS BRING “42ND STREET” TO LIFE Katy White, 11
  29. 29. DESIGN Attention to detail. Trends for 2018-2019
  30. 30. DESIGN Using libraries to ensure consistency. Trends for 2018-2019
  31. 31. PHOTOJOURNALISM Full-page photos / spreads of individuals with a focus on issues. Trends for 2018-2019
  32. 32. DESIGN Limited color palette. Using color to advance the plot. Lots of white space. Trends for 2018-2019
  33. 33. ONLINE kuler.adobe.com/ ADOBE INDESIGN ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR
  34. 34. “Titans are united. Even within our own separate groups, we are still one big family.” “Over the course of high school, I've learned to love and appreciate myself.” I get to be in the school everyone wants to be in. ODYSSEY 2018 WANNA BE US. “I work hard, and I don’t let anything get in my way.” YOU WANNA BE US ORANGECITY,FLORIDAODYSSEY2018 UniversityHighSchoolVOLUME8 YOU
  35. 35. 45Healthy Choices - Diet and Skin Care “Always wash your face, so dirt and makeup doesn’t build up in your pores,” senior Delia Beauvais said. Essential Oils Tea tree oil EVERYONE WANTS TO FEELEATING HEALTHY HELPED STUDENTS FEEL AND LOOK HEALTHY “I put tea tree oil on my face” Julia Yates said. “I try to eathealthy- No sweets,sodas or candies,”sophomore MarleyMorgan said. “I use a pomegranate face scrub every other night,” juniorCylia Jones said. “When I’m really stressed out I break out, of course, then I stress about breaking out, which makes it worse,” junior Alyssa Parker said. “I feel like what you eat makes a difference in your skin,” sophomore E’lise Johnson sad. “Healthy skin is happy skin,” junior Nafeesa Khwaja said. Perfect FRIENDS NOT FOOD As a vegetarian of two years, senior Brionna Tanner does not regret anything about changing her diet. Being vegetarian was not as difficult as it may seem. “My daily diet consists of many different things: wraps, sandwiches, pasta, salads, quesadillas, rice and so much more,” Tanner said. Photo by Grace Rooney. COVERED IN BLUE Face masks ranging in a variety of color became vital to sophomore Skylar Turner. Masks leave her skin feeling fresh and clean, and she saw the result. “I enjoy them because I feel cleaner after using them, and it’s fun experimenting with the different types,” Turner said. “I have seen actual results, some more than others.” Photo by Grace Rooney. LEAFY GREENS With a family full of meat eaters, junior Heather Ryan often finds herself struggling to eat a fresh meal. A healthy lifestyle of eating just vegetables was tricky, but Ryan found a way to stick to her diet. “The family that I live with all eat meat,” Ryansaid. “I haven’t eaten a home cooked meal since probably Thanksgiving. They usually even cook soup with meat in it, so I usually end up making something for myself or going out.” Photo by Grace Rooney. PUBLIX RUNS Starting the life of a vegetarian six months ago, senior Alexis Thompson struggles with cheating on her diet, but still sees how the choice changed her life. “I feel more energized now that I started eating healthier, and I also feel better about eating,” Thompson said. “I always go to Publix when I am looking for healthy food, because they have such a large selection of fruits and vegetables.” Photo by Haley Smith. Lotions, masks and serums lined teens’ bathroom counters, as they battled hormonal skin. With a morning and a night routine memorized in their heads, they could grab their products with their eyes closed. Using skin care products is just one way teens take care of their body on the outside. “I wash my face more than I use masks, because I can actually see results,” freshman Alexis Longo said. Taking care of how you feel on the inside is just as important when it comes to feeling healthy. Living in a house with parents who are borderline vegan, junior Journey Prickett had to find a balance between healthy foods and treats, but she learned that healthy choices were overall better for her well-being. “My family eats very healthy, but when I hang out with my friends, I don’t eat great,” Prickett said. “The difference in my skin is very noticeable.” Stress also affected student’s skin health. Breakouts of acne and blemishes acted up under times of stress or worry; however having acne could also be stressful. Healthy eating became a priority then for students who wanted to keep that from occurring. “I understand that what I eat directly affects my skin, so I try to avoid anything I know that will make it flare up,” sophomore Isabella Weaver said. Aside from a diet, sleep was one of the main challenges when it came to students and their skin care. Struggling to get a good night’s rest, sophomore Brianna Diehl fought to maintain healthy skin. “I feel like not getting a good night’s rest leaves my skin broken out and feeling gross,” Diehl said. “I also try to stay away from anything crazy greasy, because I know it’ll break me out. It’s not worth it.” Story by Grace Rooney 44 Student Life Face masks
  36. 36. 98 99Winter Guard & Innovations DanceClubs & Sports “I feel more confident with myself and the team,” junior Joey Salvatori said. “We go over the routine a lot and at the end we all talk about how we feel about how we did.” Photo by Kaitlyn Mould. “During practices, we clean our dances up,” sophomore Megan Tirado said. “We go over it over and over again to make sure we are in sync with each other.” Photo by Kaitlyn Mould. “Through practice, you gain muscle memory for the choreography and it makes performing a lot easier,” senior Courtney Lee said. “You perform how you practice, and it is mostly based on that.” Photo by Kaitlyn Mould. “The jacket shows who we are as a team and how it respects our school,” sophomore Kaley Lapp said. “When we are out at competitions we wear our jackets to respect our school as a team.” “It is important our hair is done, so that the team looks professional in uniform and with each other at competition,” freshman Sabrina Schepmans said. “We want to represent UHS in the best way possible.” PERFORM AT YOURbest BREAKING BACK Doing stretches on the barre, senior Litzy Garduno and junior Aleia Coberley warm up for practice. The stretches helped them work on posture for competitions. “We do a pardabra, it helps us for upcoming competitions by stretching our backs and making us look better on stage,” Garduno said. “There is a little bit of ballet in everything.” Photo by Carson Francis. STRAIGHT AHEAD In the start of class, the dancers stretch to prepare for their routines. Senior Regina Lopez warmed up and practiced two days a week for competitions. “Doing stretches for our feet and legs, like tondoos, ronajoms, and jet ayes helps prepare us,” Lopez said. Photo by Carson Francis. PUTTING MASCARA ON While in their dressing room, Innovation dance members have a certain make up look they have to do for each performance. Senior Janeeya Hudson put on mascara along with foundation, bronzer and wine red lipstick. “Getting prepared, I did a smokey eye so we all looked professional on stage,” Hudson said. “We do our make up so we look professional and not washed up.” Photo by Coral Estes. FIFTH POSITION As the Innovation dance team members walked onto stage, they were in sync throughout their ballet routine. “We did a lot of conditioning and leg workouts and after learning the choreography we went over it until most people got it right,” junior Katelyn Meckley said. “After we have to watch a video of us performing and see what we did wrong and what we could’ve done better.” Photo by Emily Edwards. ON POINTE Walking onto the dark stage, Senior Sydney Maybaum, junior Aleia Coberley and sophomore Reagan Adkins, the light begins to shine on them as the audience notices their pointe shoes. During practice, they stretched their feet to avoid getting injured on stage. “Before performances, I usually just run the dances in my head or stretch before hand to make sure I am warm and ready,” Adkins said. “I stretch by doing my splits and have my feet pushed down to prevent injuries when doing the Pointe.” Photo by Emily Edwards. WINTER GUARD MEMBERS GET IN COMPETITION MODE WINTER GUARD MEMBERS REVEALED COMPETITION NECESSITIES WHAT’S IN MY Story by Kaitlyn Mould MEET ME AT THEBarreINNOVATIONS PREPARED FOR THEIR COMPETITIONS “We each have a specific role to do and this year I am on equipment,” sophomore Courtney Zarra said. “I have a solo, and I toss a quad rifle. I toss both weapons and flags equally.” Duffle Bag? Rifle Jacket Hair Products While backstage, junior Aleia Coberley and the group stretched their bodies and tested their flexibility. The group prepared to dance to all types of music from jazz, kick, and hip- hop. Senior Jasmine McTyer practiced her routines and shared embarrassing stories to build up confidence among the team before they performed. As they danced on stage their smiles never left their faces. The hours of conditioning and perfecting their skills paid off in the end. Helping her teammates through last minute panic attacks before they performed, junior Alexis Bouters found herself critiquing her performance before her feet even hit the stage. “Usually to critique myself I look at myself in the mirror and point out all the little details I can fix,” Bouters said. “Right before we go on stage everyone usually has a last minute panic attacks, and I tell everyone how amazing we are going to do and how much I love them.” The audience ended the performance with a round of applause, unbeknownst to the fact of how much time and energy the dancers put into creating the show. “The audience doesn’t know how much hard work my team and I put into our dances,” senior Gianna Gesuele said. “Sometimes the arts programs at our school are overlooked and it would be nice for all of us to receive some recognition.” A pep talk by coach Deidra Despard to the team built up their confidence before and after they performed. “I remind them of how much they have practiced and each member gives critiques, positive and negative, to encourage them,” Despard said. In the end, the whole group is a big family, they brought craziness and their energy wherever they traveled to compete. “What makes us The Innovation Dance Team is the way it is when we always have each others back no matter what,” senior Litzy Garduno said. “We stick together and we went in a performance as a group. If we fail, then we fail together.”
  37. 37. a little thing that means a lot to me is... “My hat.” Matthew Brandolino ‘18 DESIGNER chiavang sports VARSITY SWIM WAS THE FIRST TIME YOU SWAM cHAllEngIng? This year was much more challenging than the last because [it is] GB swim. Last year was Gators which wasn’t a lot of commitment and it was in the summer. WHY dId YOU jOIn In THE FIRST plAcE? I swim because I am required to if I play water polo, so I don’t really have much of a passion for it. WHAT dO YOU lIkE And dOn’T lIkE AbOUT SWIM? I don’t like the amount of time that’s required and waiting around between races for meets, although I love the feeling of getting a better time especially when you’re in a relay and you help the team. dO YOU gET AlOng WITH THE TEAM? Many of my best friends are not on the team, but I get along with everybody. IS THERE AnYTHIng YOU STRUgglEd On? I’m terrible at both backstroke and butterfly, but to be honest, I would ather focus on freestyle and breaststroke so that I can at least be competitive in those two. dO YOU RElAx bEFORE A RAcE OR jUMp AROUnd TO gET YOUR EnERgY FlOWIng? Before a race, I swim 6-10 laps to warm up and then right before, I jump in and I usually shake out my arms a lot. Story by Chia Vang In THE FAST lAnE Swimming his favorite stroke, sophomore Christian Murphy enjoys the fast pace. “I like how fast it can go, it’s the easiest and the quickest stroke, so I like going really fast,” Murphy said. Photo by Lindsay Withrow IndIAn SWIM Paddling in a line, senior Shelby McPhail swims the NASCAR. “We were doing the NASCAR, the swim version of the Indian run, and it was our first time doing it; it was really fun and easy,” McPhail said. Photo by Chia Vang FUll UpS Taking a break, senior Keenan Koukol waits for his turn. “You go all the way under water, then push up to that. We were supposed to keep going until the other guys in our lane finished their set, then we would switch places,” Koukol said. Photo by Chia Vang “I like freestyle because it’s my best stroke.” justin dillon ‘15 What is your favorite stroke and why it is your favorite? “Freestyle because I like to sprint, fast race and it gets you really pumped up.” cody Hurtado ‘15 needIsayMORE ? “Sprint freestyle is my favorite because it’s the most fun.” Summer Spradley ‘15 “Probably butterffly because it’s not that difficult for me.” Shelby khatami ‘16 WORkIng OUT Lifting a weight ball, sophomore Alison Bishop finds the workout difficult sometimes. “They suck, but they do make you stronger for swim and my arms feel like jello after,” Bishop said. Photo by Chia Vang 1 1. FlYIn’ Attempting the butterfly stroke, senior Carson Hubred believes it’s not her strongest. “My best stroke is freestyle, I don’t have a problem with butterfly, I just don’t swim it much,” Hubred said. Photo by Chia Vang 2. In THE lAnE Using his favorite breaststroke, sophomore Connor MacDonald prepares for a meet. “I love the feeling of gliding through the water,” MacDonald said. Photo by Chia Vang 3. bAckIn’ Up At work in the lane, junior Cameron Genetti finds it difficult to do the backstroke. “I get lost when I look into the blue sky. The strength of my right arm throws me off,” Genetti said. Photo by Chia Vang2 3 Freshman Daniel Giles talks about his experience in varsity swimming Making WAVES
  38. 38. IDEAS Modeling after professional magazines, other yearbooks, online media, social media, newspapers Trends for 2018-2019
  39. 39. •Catalog
  40. 40. The future What should we watch out for? Partnering with online media. Maintaining our mission — to be a historical record. Covering and designing to community standards. Using technology to its fullest.
  41. 41. Teamwork Reporter and Photojournalist and Designer and Editor, all working with Online staff.
  42. 42. Teamwork Assignment
  43. 43. By Bradley Wilson, PhD bradleywilson08@gmail.com bradleywilsononline.net • @bradleywilson09 ©2018

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