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  • Thank you YALSA!
  • “ If you work in a library, you know this scenario: You can hear them coming before they actually hit the door. They travel in duos or groups - perhaps better called packs – and they bring their noise and chatter with them. Once inside the library, they are a challenge to all. At the reference desk, they ask demanding questions that require constant follow-up. They have very specific needs, as though there is only one answer to their question and it is some kind of test for you to find it. Even worse are those who ask the same simple questions requiring repeatedly the same sources, year after year. Some are adept at computers and microfilm, but most are not. They may also dress funny and behave oddly. Disorganization rules as they spread out their mounds of paper until they’ve buried an entire table (or tables). They rarely say “Thank you.” To the nonreference staff they are pestering – needing change for the r, wanting special favors because they are “regulars” and often leaving a mess of crumpled paper and food crumbs behind them. Because of this pestering, and also because they are loud, disorganized, messy and difficult, most staff consider them obnoxious and are happy to see them go away or find a specialist to help them. They are a difficult user group indeed.” (Patrick Jones, Connecting Young Adults and Libraries, second edition 2000 p 71) Thank goodness I work with teenagers, and not with genealogists…
  • “ If you work in a library, you know this scenario: You can hear them coming before they actually hit the door. They travel in duos or groups - perhaps better called packs – and they bring their noise and chatter with them. Once inside the library, they are a challenge to all. At the reference desk, they ask demanding questions that require constant follow-up. They have very specific needs, as though there is only one answer to their question and it is some kind of test for you to find it. Even worse are those who ask the same simple questions requiring repeatedly the same sources, year after year. Some are adept at computers and microfilm, but most are not. They may also dress funny and behave oddly. Disorganization rules as they spread out their mounds of paper until they’ve buried an entire table (or tables). They rarely say “Thank you.” To the nonreference staff they are pestering – needing change for the copies, wanting special favors because they are “regulars” and often leaving a mess of crumpled paper and food crumbs behind them. Because of this pestering, and also because they are loud disorganized, messy and difficult, most staff consider them obnoxious and are happy to see them go away or find a specialist to help them. They are a difficult user group indeed.” (Patrick Jones, Connecting Young Adults and Libraries, second edition 2000 p 71) Thank goodness I work with teenagers, and not with genealogists…
  •   Teens rebel when they have something to rebel against. Increase their responsibilities and freedom of choice, and they have nothing to rebel against, and can use their energy for other purposes.
  • Girl’s brains myelinate faster than boys – may account for earlier “emotional maturity” The amygdala prompter of gut impulses grows faster in boys, prompting development of physical and spatial skills, and other cerebellum processes The hippocampus memory center grows faster in girls, prompting development in social cognition
  • Sleep deprivation results in: Crankiness Depression Insomnia Perceived laziness Lack of energy Poor judgment 
  • Strive to offer quality service to all patrons. Take an interest in teen culture and activities. Get out from behind the desk. Be enthusiastic and respectful. Involve students as often as possible – volunteer opportunities, creating displays, tailoring your website to reflect current assignments, showcasing student work, etc…
  • Strive to offer quality service to all patrons. Take an interest in teen culture and activities. Get out from behind the desk. Be enthusiastic and respectful. Involve students as often as possible – volunteer opportunities, creating displays, tailoring your website to reflect current assignments, showcasing student work, etc…
  • Strive to offer quality service to all patrons. Take an interest in teen culture and activities. Get out from behind the desk. Be enthusiastic and respectful. Involve students as often as possible – volunteer opportunities, creating displays, tailoring your website to reflect current assignments, showcasing student work, etc…
  • Strive to offer quality service to all patrons. Take an interest in teen culture and activities. Get out from behind the desk. Be enthusiastic and respectful. Involve students as often as possible – volunteer opportunities, creating displays, tailoring your website to reflect current assignments, showcasing student work, etc…
  • Strive to offer quality service to all patrons. Take an interest in teen culture and activities. Get out from behind the desk. Be enthusiastic and respectful. Involve students as often as possible – volunteer opportunities, creating displays, tailoring your website to reflect current assignments, showcasing student work, etc…
  • 1976-1996

Watertownbrain09 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. PAIN IN THE BRAIN: TEEN LIBRARY(MIS) BEHAVIOR 101 Presented by Beth Gallaway for Watertown Free Public Library, August 2009
  • 2. Beth Gallaway: Contact & Slides
    • Email: informationgoddess29@gmail.com
    • Cell: 603.247.3196
    • web: www.informationgoddess.info
    • Slides: www.slideshare.net/informationgoddess29/
    • Links: www.delicious.com/informationgoddess29/brain
  • 3. Do you have Ephebiphobia?
  • 4. Icebreaker
    • Name
    • Dept/Library
    • 1 thing you enjoy about working with teens
  • 5. Library Behaviors
    • Groups
      • Blocking entrance or access
      • Roaming
      • Taking up space
    • “ Courting” Behavior
    • Backtalk and “disrespect”
    • Eating & drinking
    • Cell phone use
  • 6. Library Behaviors
    • Language
    • Sex
    • Vandalism
    • Theft
    • Violence
    • Cyberbullying
  • 7. Differentiate between the 2 Ds:
    • Disruptive
      • Normal
      • Annoying
    • Dangerous
      • Abnormal
      • Harmful to self & others
      • Illegal
  • 8. Why Do Teenagers Act That Way?
    • They hate the library?
    • They hate YOU (the librarian)?
    • It’s a contest?
    • Their hormones?
    • The weather?
    • Their age?
  • 9. Influences on Teen Behavior
    • Cultural
    • Sociological
    • Personal
    • Psychological
    • Biological
  • 10. Cultural
    • Who taught you how to behave in the library?
    • How do patrons know how to behave in the library
  • 11. Sociological
    • Who do teens spend their time with?
  • 12. Personal
    • What are some personal issues teens face the might influence behavior?
  • 13. Psychological
    • What are teens going through during adolescence?
    • What are the unique experiences that characterize them?
  • 14. On Rules
    • Create a behavior policy
    • Same rules for everyone
    • No rules set up to fail
    • The less rules, the better 
    • Word rules in a positive way 
    • Leave rules open ended
  • 15. Developmental Needs
    • Positive Social Interaction with Adults & Peers
    • Structure & Clear Limits
    • Physical Activity
    • Creative Expression
    • Competence & Achievement
    • Meaningful Participation
    • Opportunities for Self-Definition
    Source: National Middle School Association (1996). Research Summary: Young Adolescent’s Developmental Needs, 2006
  • 16. Developmental Needs
    • Positive Interaction with Adults and Peers (seek attention, approval)
    • Boundaries & Expectations (push boundaries, challenge authority)
    • Physical Activity (run from computer to computer, roam)
    • Creative Expression (vandalism, MySpace
    • Competence & Achievement (competitive behavior, RuneScape obsession)
    • Meaningful Participation (opinionated, socialization)
    • Opportunities for Self-Definition
    National Middle School Association (1996). Research Summary: Young Adolescent’s Developmental Needs, 2006
  • 17. Biological
    • The corpus callosum stopped developing around age 5 (grows through adolescence)
    • The brain didn’t grow after age 10 (grows through adolescence)
    • Myelination was complete before puberty (continues well into young adulthood)
  • 18. Frontal Lobe
    • Facilitates:
    • Planning
    • Decision-making
    • Results in:
    • Poor decisions
    • Poor management
    Source: http://www.thecuriousmind.com/brain-cm.html
  • 19. Myelin Sheath
    • Facilitates:
    • Intelligent response to gut reactions
    • Learning new things
    • Concrete to abstract thought
    • Results in:
    • Reacting
    • Poor memory/recall
    • Lack of focus and attention
    • Poor organizational skills
    • Bad impulse control
    Source: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/images/ency/fullsize/9682.jpg
  • 20. Dopamine
    • Controls:
    • Smooth motor skills
    • Pleasure center
    • Results in:
    • Risk-taking, novelty seeking
    • Excitability, loudness
    Source: http://www.3dchem.com/imagesofmolecules/Dopamine.jpg
  • 21. Serotonin
    • Controls:
    • Temperature
    • Mood
    • Appetite
    • Emotion
    • Results in:
    • Moodiness
  • 22. Melatonin
    • Controls:
    • Sleep/wake cycles
    • Biological clock
    • Results:
    • Brain development
    • REM sleep has been linked to learning ability
  • 23. Behavioral Strategies
    • Boundary setting is extremely important
    • Address behavior in terms of actions and consequences in a matter of fact, non-threatening manner
  • 24. Set Boundaries
    • State unacceptable behavior
      • Optional: explain why it’s unacceptable
    • State consequence of continued unacceptable behavior
    • Ask patron to make a choice
  • 25. Examples
    • “ John, it’s too noisy over here, and some people are trying to study. If you continue to be disruptive, I will need to ask you to leave. You can choose to lower the volume level and stay or you can choose to leave.
    • Mary, your computer time is up, we have someone waiting. If you continue to violate the time limit, I will have to suspend your computer privileges. You can choose to log off now and get more time tomorrow, or lose your computer access for 2 days.”
  • 26. Keep in Mind…
    • “ Librarians do not kick teens out of the library. Teens get themselves kicked out of the library, because of their behavior.”
    • ~ Nick Buron, NYPL, Queens Branch
  • 27. Correcting Behavior
    • 3 Strikes & You’re Out!
    • Target the Group Leader
    • Good Cop, Bad Cop
    • Invade Personal Space
  • 28. Follow Through
    • Welcome back
    • Introduce
    • Discuss behavior incident
    • Reinforce consequences of actions
    • Start with a clean slate
  • 29. Nip Undesirable Behavior in the Bud!
    • Create raving fans of the library  
    • Develop personal relationships
    • Give them a space of their own 
    • Program them to death
    • Deliver excellent reference & reader’s advisory, and practice excellent customer service
  • 30. Create Raving Fans
    • Meaningful participation
    • Foster ownership of the library and teen space 
    • Evaluate!
  • 31. Develop Personal Relationships
    • Talk to teens when they do something RIGHT
    • Introduce yourself, repeatedly 
    • Greet patrons by name
    • Get out from behind the desk
    • Get out of the library 
  • 32. Give Them a Room of Their Own
    • More than just a shelf and a poster
    • Convert a meeting room to a homework center or program room a few days a week
    • Designate a staff person to serve teens
  • 33. Program Them to Death
    • Engage them in meaningful participation
    • Give teens positive ways to expend their energy
      • Offer after school activities
      • Cultivate a volunteer program
  • 34. Be an Excellent Librarian!
    • Customer Service
    • Reference
    • Reader’s Advisory
  • 35. Reminders for Librarians
    • Stay calm
    • It’s not personal
    • Teens are job security
    • Learn to RAP 
    •  
  • 36. Moment of Truth
    • R emember
    • A ccept
    • P roject
  • 37. Thank You!
    • Slides: http://infogdss.wordpress.com
    • Email: informationgoddess29@gmail.com
    • 603.247.3196