Adeil voice 10.10.2013

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  • {"5":"The delivery of online courses is higher education’s response to the global growth in the economy (Adams, 2008; Friedman, 2005). Since 1990, an increase in post-secondary distance learning occurred (Allen & Seamen, 2006). \nInstitutions of higher education experienced growth in the online learning field (Allen & Seaman, 2006; Khare & Lam, 2008; Li & Irby, 2008; Simonsen, 2006). With the continued expansion, post-secondary schools are researching the possibilities of offering online programs if the schools have not already started a distance education program (Turner & Crews, 2005).\nMoskal, Dziuban, Upchurch, Hartman, and Truman (2006) proposed that although distance education adds value, students are often less successful and have a higher dropout rate than in traditional schools. Although online education is experiencing a continued expansion, an omission of social interaction in distance learning, web-based courses as compared to face-to-face traditional classroom courses exists (Kanuka & Anderson, 1998; Shank, 2004; Slagter van Tryon & Bishop, 2006; Walls, 2005). \nSlagter van Tryon and Bishop (2006) conducted a Delphi-method study, which identified that online instructors do not achieve a social connection (e-connectivity) with their students. Using online experts, Slagter van Tryon and Bishop gathered data and synthesized the information to present strategies addressing the lack of social interaction or e-connectivity in an online classroom.\nThe role of the instructor has evolved through technological advances (Borstorff & Lowe, 2007). The instructors impart their knowledge to their students (Lee & Busch, 2005). The learning platform has changed greatly, evolving from teaching through correspondence courses to offering courses asynchronously over the Internet. The learning platform will continue to change through the advances of technology (Bellack, 2008; Borstorff & Lowe, 2007; Smedberg, 2004). The curriculum has evolved through the years. The students have not changed; however, each student has a different learning style (Mupinga, Nora, & Yaw, 2006). Distance education faculty and administrators do not consider the social and psychological needs of each student’s learning styles (Fearing & Riley, 2005). In the online learning environment, students may not have their social and psychological needs met.\nSitzman and Lenars (2006) stated that a successful online learning experience would encompass an empathetic instructor who is sensitive to personal issues and has a connection to the student. Sometimes the negative perception of the online instructor may hinder the learning experience and negate the quality of the course delivery (Wilkes, Simon, & Brooks, 2006). A successful online class design will meet the learner’s needs both technologically and socially with an assessment of student learning styles (Dupin-Bryant & DuCharme-Hansen, 2005). Students who function successfully in traditional classrooms may not succeed in asynchronous web-based learning (Bell, 2007).\nIn the distance-learning realm, forgotten are the social and psychological aspects of education (Guri-Rosenbilt, 2005). Simonsen (2008) emphasized the importance of presenting the course materials through different methods. Palloff and Pratt (1999) stated the most important aspects of education are social. Martinez (2003) stated that course designers might consider students' personalities when designing online classrooms. Students interact with other students and their instructor in the traditional classroom through pedagogical and social interaction (Thompson & Ku, 2006). When managing a traditional classroom developing a relationship between the instructor and student(s) permits genuine academic growth (Brown, 2005). Not only may the content of the curriculum be authentic and rich with learning materials, sufficient collaboration, and e-connectivity for the students may exist (Calvert, 2005).\nBy not connecting with the social and psychological needs of distance learning students, a negative effect on retention may occur because of students believing they are out of touch or unable to connect (e-connectivity) with their instructors. Wilkes et al. (2006) stated that students and instructors do not communicate effectively in the asynchronous classroom. The lack of engaging the social and psychological needs of distance learners, negatively affects the dropout rate of online students. Slagter van Tryon and Bishop (2006) stated that the attrition rate in the online classroom is at least 40% higher than a traditional classroom. Some institutions have forced interaction by requiring faculty members to conduct synchronized chats or lectures and host mandatory office hours. Although an emphasis on any time, any place education continues, studying how distance educators can better achieve social connectivity in the online classroom is important. Perhaps a blend between asynchronous and synchronous classroom environment may exist (Klein, 2007; Wijekumar & Spielvogel, 2006).\n","14":"http://audacity.sourceforge.net/\n","4":"In a review of contemporary literature, research revealed that students believe they are unable to connect with their instructors in online classrooms (Hughes, Ventura, & Dando, 2007; Stichter, Lewis, Richter, Johnson, & Bradley, 2006). \nA general problem exists because faculty, administrators, curriculum designers, and student advisors in institutions that offer online programs do not adequately address the social and psychological connectivity needs of students (DeShields, Kara, & Kaynak, 2005). \nThis lack of attention to the social and affective needs has a negative effect on learner satisfaction and retention (Bonk, 2002; Melrose & Bergeron, 2006; Moody, 2004; Simpson, 2004; Slagter van Tryon & Bishop, 2006).\nSwanson, A., Hutkin, R., Babb, D., & Howell, S. (2010, Sep). Establishing the best practices for social interaction and e-connectivity in online higher education classes. Doctoral dissertation, University of Phoenix, Arizona. Publication Number: 3525517. Retrieved from http://gradworks.umi.com/3525517.pdf\n"}
  • Adeil voice 10.10.2013

    1. 1. Created by Dr. Andree Swanson, Ashford University Dr. Paula Zobisch, Ashford University © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Presented in Ashford’s Faculty Forum
    2. 2.  Theory behind the addition of sound into the online classroom  Jumping In and Getting Started  Adding Voice with Free Online Programs © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies
    3. 3. © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies
    4. 4. • Research revealed: • Students believe they are unable to connect with their instructors in online classrooms • General problem: • Faculty and administrators in online programs… • Social and psychological connectivity needs of students are not addressed This lack of attention to the social and affective needs has a negative effect on learner satisfaction and retention © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Swanson, Hutkin, Babb, & Howell. (2010, Sep)
    5. 5. • More online courses • Often less successful • Higher dropout rate than in traditional schools. • Online instructors do not achieve a social connection (e-connectivity) with their students (Slagter van Tryon & Bishop , 2006) • Faculty do not consider the social • Omission of social interaction and psychological needs of each in distance learning student’s learning styles (Fearing & Riley, 2005). © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Swanson, Hutkin, Babb, & Howell. (2010, Sep)
    6. 6.  E-connectivity  Feelings of social connectedness  Between students and faculty  In a technologically enhanced online learning environment (Slagter van Tyson, 2007; Slagter van Tyson & Bishop, 2006) © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Swanson, Hutkin, Babb, & Howell. (2010, Sep)
    7. 7.  Show relevance to students  Establish e-connectivity  Instructor presence  Positive communication  Ability to be open to social networking  Use of technologies to e-connect © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Swanson, Hutkin, Babb, & Howell. (2010, Sep)
    8. 8. • To be heard • To feel that they are cared about • To know that someone is out there Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art. © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Swanson, Hutkin, Babb, & Howell. (2010, Sep)
    9. 9. • We remember • 10 % of what we hear • 20 % of what we see • 65 % of what we see and hear Image(s) from The Weiss-McGrath Report
    10. 10.  "Tell me and I forget.  Teach me and I remember.  Involve me and I learn.” Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.
    11. 11. © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.
    12. 12.  Use a…  good quality microphone  headset © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from Google images.
    13. 13. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from Audacity.net
    14. 14. BENEFITS     DRAWBACKS  Have to download program Free!  More for music recording Open source software Record audio than voice audio Convert tapes and records into digital recordings or CD “Audacity® is free, open source, crossplatform software for recording and editing sounds.” © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from Audacity.net
    15. 15. http://audioexpert.com/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from AudioExpert.com
    16. 16. BENEFITS   Free! Can record or upload audio DRAWBACKS   More for creative or fun audio clips Have to join “AudioExpert is a free and simple online audio editor, file converter and sound recorder.” “If your computer is equipped with a camera and microphone, you can use AudioExpert to record your sounds” © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from AudioExpert.com
    17. 17. http://www.audiopal.com © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from AudioPal.com
    18. 18. BENEFITS       Free No account needed No registration required Can record audio by text to speech (TTS) Upload your MP3 file Computer mic © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies DRAWBACKS   Limited to 60 second audio Enter your email address and Audio Pal will email a passcode to retrieve your file Image(s) from AudioPal.com
    19. 19. https://croak.it © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from croak.it
    20. 20. BENEFITS  DRAWBACKS Free   100 a day    Android App Apple App Login with Facebook or Twitter  Login with Facebook or Twitter Free account is limited  30 s fixed length “The croak.it Talk button is the simplest way to add an effective voice feedback system on your website.” © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from croak.it
    21. 21. http://www.houndbite.com/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from houndbite.com
    22. 22. BENEFITS DRAWBACKS Free Have to register RSS feed    method of distributing     links to content in your web site that you'd like others to use.  Interview someone and record it and share it © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Have to Log in Listen & share audio clips Did not see how to record an audio clip “Houndbite.com is a home for entertaining audio clips from your life. From prank calls, inspiring speeches, to guitar riffs, Houndbites happen. Share them with the world.” Image(s) from houndbite.com
    23. 23. http://soundcloud.com/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from soundcloud.com
    24. 24. Drawbacks  Free © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Set up for creators of music to share and listen  Register  Image(s) from soundcloud.com
    25. 25. http://vocaroo.com/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from vocaroo.com
    26. 26. BENEFITS    Good for feedback Recording is deleted after a period of time No account needed © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies DRAWBACKS  Not permanent  Recording is deleted after a period of time Image(s) from vocaroo.com
    27. 27.  To Record  To Playback Press “Click to Record” Click “Listen” for playback to begin Click “Allow” Camera and Microphone Access Click “Save” Click “Listen” when finished © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Option to upload and URL to recording provided Image(s) from vocaroo.com
    28. 28. VOICE THREAD http://vocaroo.com/ © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from VoiceThread.com
    29. 29. BENEFITS      Free! Cloud application Seemless application to Learning Management Systems Apple App Android App © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies DRAWBACKS   Big Not as simple as others Image(s) from VoiceThread.com
    30. 30. • Free • Easy to use • Convey complex ideas easily • Increase student comprehension • Increase student e-connectivity © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies Image(s) from MicroSoft Clipart
    31. 31.  Free!  Free! Adding Video Snippets Adding a Story Board to your Presentations  Free! Survey Tools  Free or Reasonably Priced – APA Helpers: What is out there for Students and Faculty  Free! References and Bibliography Assistance  Free! Providing Feedback – Some Easy to Use Methods © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies
    32. 32. Dr. Andree Swanson Dr. Paula Zobisch © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies http://rediscoveringthebible.com/Biographies.html
    33. 33. Assistant Professor, Ashford University Ed.D. Educational Leadership, University of Phoenix ▪ MA, Organizational Management, University of Phoenix ▪ MHR, Human Relations, University of Oklahoma  Former Dean of General Education at a distance learning university  Former National Training Manager  Former government employee   © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies
    34. 34.  Assistant Professor, Ashford University  Ph.D. Adult Education, Capella University; MBA emphasis in Marketing, University of Central Oklahoma  Director of Marketing and Major Accounts Sales Manager, 3M Distributor, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1989 – 2007 © 2013 Zobisch & Swanson Research Studies

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