Gift of Respect Art
 &
 Dialogue
 Project - New England Center for Civic Life
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Gift of Respect Art
 &
 Dialogue
 Project - New England Center for Civic Life

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The theme for this years program was respect. Through storytelling, readings, writing, and studio sessions, students explored their experiences with respect (or lack thereof). During the studio ...

The theme for this years program was respect. Through storytelling, readings, writing, and studio sessions, students explored their experiences with respect (or lack thereof). During the studio sessions, students made boxes which contained stories they had written. The exterior of the boxes visually represent their contents. The Gift of Respect project culminated in a multimedia celebration that included a display of the storyboxes, videos, and a light show created by students at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, New Hampshire.

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Gift of Respect Art
 &
 Dialogue
 Project - New England Center for Civic Life Gift of Respect Art
 &
 Dialogue
 Project - New England Center for Civic Life Presentation Transcript

  • Gift
of
Respect 
 Art
&
Dialogue
Project
2013 
 New
England
Center
for
Civic
Life 

  • The
box
I
created
is
dark
and
there
are
many
broken
items
on
it.
They
represent
how
torn

 I
felt
after
a
customer
disrespected
me.
I
also
poked
nails
through
the
box
to
show
that
 disrespect
can
hurt
others.
The
aluminum
foil
symbolizes
how
one
treats
others
reflects
the
 kind
of
person
they
are.
The
stones
represents
the
saying
“Sticks
and
stones
may
break
my
 bones,
but
words
will
never
hurt
me.”
 Making
my
box
allowed
me
to
express
my
feelings
through
art.
After
I
was
done,
I
felt
like
a
 big
weight
was
lifted
off
my
shoulders.
The
experience
at
work
always
bothered
me.
Now
I
 look
at
the
experience
as
a
learning
process.
It
made
me
grow
as
a
person,
and
creating
this
 box
made
me
realize
this.




 

























































































































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 












 —Crystal
Colon

  • I
felt
happy
and
calm
creating
this
box,
it
was
 nice
to
be
in
the
warm
lakeside
classroom
on
the
 cold
foggy
morning
and
since
my
story
was
special
 to
me,
it
brought
me
serenity
and
comfort.
I
 choose
pink
camouflage
tissue
paper
because
 pink
is
the
color
for
breast
cancer
and
my
Mom
is
 a
solider
against
this
disease.
There
are
four
 strands
of
gold
tissue
paper
for
the
long
line
of
 strong
women
I
come
from.
On
my
Mom’s
gold
 line
are
four
stones,
representing
me
and
my
 three
sisters.
A
silver
strand
of
rope
across
the
 bottom
of
the
box
is
a
nod
to
my
best
friend’s
 mom,
who
we
lost
from
breast
cancer.

 The
camouflage
paper
also
symbolizes
that
this
is
 a
great
emotional
internal
battle
and
a
large
gold
 “I”
on
a
stone
represents
that
our
story
is
only
one
 of
millions.
On
the
sides
are
the
names
of
women
 I
know
who
have
fought
or
been
affected
by
the
 disease.
They
are
sisters,
mothers,
and
friends,
 and
they
inspire
me
and
give
me
great
strength.
 































 
 
 























 —Jacklyn
Therrien

  • 
My
story
is
about
a
physically
handicapped
boy
who
slipped
on
a
patch
of
ice
and
fell.
 Another
boy
went
up
to
him
and
offered
a
hand,
but
then
decided
to
kick
him
in
the
stomach
 instead.
I
wish
I
had
been
able
to
help
the
handicapped
boy
but
I
was
in
complete
shock,
 unable
to
process
what
was
happening.
Overcoming
obstacles
in
a
difficult
situation
is
an
 opportunity
to
become
a
strong
person.
This
message
can
apply
to
anyone
who
has
witnessed
 other
people
go
through
a
tough
time.
 Rocks
represent
that
life
can
sometimes
have
rough
patches.
A
piece
of
string
looks
like
a
 maze
and
represents
that
these
rough
patches
can
sometimes
be
confusing.
The
pieces
of
that
 puzzle
are
still
not
put
together
in
my
head,
and
I
do
not
believe
that
they
ever
will
be.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 —Leah
Hoard

  • Hands
down,
my
gift
of
respect

 goes
to
my
Dad.
My
father
is
a
captain

 in
the
Army
reserves.
At
the
beginning

 of
my
freshman
year,
he
was
deployed

 to
Khost,
Afghanistan,
for
18
months.

 I
would
get
a
phone
call
every
Thursday
 night
and
sometimes
it
felt
like
he
could
 fix
a
rainy
day
just
by
the
sound
of
his
 voice.
Other
days
I
wouldn’t
get
that
 phone
call
and
I
would
just
sit
there
 waiting
for
the
phone
to
ring.
 I
don’t
have
any
tattoos
on
my
body,

 but
if
I
did
I
would
get
a
tattoo
that

 has
the
captain
emblem
with
“Capt.
 Kellough”
on
my
right
peck.
Every
time

 I
see
soldier
I
gladly
shake
their
hand

 and
say
“thank
you.”
They
go
to
heal

 and
back
so
we
can
live
in
peace.
 
























—Donnie
Kellough

  • My
brother
Jake
is
a
superhero
to
his
students.
The
children
look
up
to
him
as
a
teacher
 and
a
friend.
Jake
is
23
years
old
and
teaches
in
a
cognitive
learning
classroom.
Although
 Jake
is
teaching
the
class,
he
is
learning
even
more
from
his
students.
These
children
show
 others
how
to
appreciate
life,
be
happy,
and
love
everyone.
 Jake
demonstrates
respect
in
his
classroom
everyday
to
his
students.
I
respect
Jake
and
all
 that
he
does
for
his
students.
When
given
a
chance,
children
with
learning
disabilities
can
 accomplish
great
thinks.
Respect
and
pride
make
these
people
active
members
of
society.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Nicole
Galewski 

  • My
box
is
covered
with
black
and
white
paper.
These
zebra
lines
represent
the
world
of
 black
and
white.
The
seashells
represent
tranquility,
but
mixed
along
with
them
are
 random
puzzle
pieces
that
don’t
belong
together.
There
is
heavy
and
thick
metal
chain
.
.
.
 showing
that
there
is
a
line
drawn
and
that
it
cannot
be
broken.
 My
box
shows
my
journey
to
self‐respect;
a
journey
out
of
disrespect
and
discrimination.
It
 visually
represents
the
need
for
peace
and
acceptance
in
a
society
where
black
and
white
 lines
are
drawn.
Chains
symbolize
self‐baggage
and
how
that
weighs
down
the
victim.
One
 side
is
disrespect
and
the
other
is
a
lack
of
self‐respect
and
the
yearning
to
fit
into
an
 animalistic
society.

I
was
trying
to
express
what
disrespect
can
do
to
you.

 





















































































—
Patience
Turkson

  • When
I
was
11
years
old
the
coach
of
the
opposing
team
used
unethical
practices
to
gain
the
 upper‐advantage.
Our
team
lost
the
game
and
the
season.
We
maintained
our
composure,
 acted
as
professionals,
and
“took
the
high
road”
in
a
terrible
and
heart‐breaking
situation.

 The
black
lines
on
the
box
jump
out,
especially
the
third
base
line
where
the
opposing
team
 was
located.
That
line
was
purposefully
drawn
in
a
“crooked”
manner.
The
buttons
represent
 a
“circle
of
trust”
which
was
also
broken.
Green
duct
tape
represents
the
grass
and
how
vivid
 the
day
was.
My
name
at
the
bottom
is
in
small,
adhesive
“sticky
letters”
because
I
felt
 nonexistent,
irrelevant,
and
disrespected.
I
will
save
my
box
for
as
long
as
I
live
to
show
my
 children
and
to
remind
myself.
I
have
learned
to
positively
deal
with
adversity
and
that,
 unfortunately,
everything
does
not
always
go
a
person’s
way. 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Justin
James
Hopkins

  • This
box
tells
the
story
of
a
complicated
relationship.
For
many
years
I
danced
with
a
girl
who
 was
an
on‐again/off‐again
kind
of
friend.

 The
places
on
the
top
that
intertwine
represent
when
our
friendship
was
close.
The
area
where
 the
paths
spread
apart
represents
time
when
she
disrespected
my
fellow
classmates,
our
 instructors,
and
me.
The
paths
come
together
again
to
show
a
time
when
she
seemed
to
have
 changed.
At
the
end
the
paths
go
their
separate
ways,
just
like
when
she
left
our
studio
on
bad
 terms.
The
ribbons
mirror
the
friendship
we
had.
On
one
side
there
is
a
space
sewn
together
to
 show
reconciliation,
but
on
the
opposite
side
the
ribbon
is
almost
completely
severed,
which
is
 how
she
left
things.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Marissa
Moore

  • Christina
was
a
freshman
at
my
high
school.
 Last
May
she
passed
away
in
her
sleep.
 Throughout
this
tragedy,
the
freshmen
stayed
 strong.
They
talked
about
how
they
felt
about
 her
passing,
and
worked
through
their
difficult
 times.


 The
upside‐down
ice
cream
cone
represents
 something
upsetting
to
a
child.
The
broken

 clock
represents
how
suddenly
your
world
can
 change.
The
playing
cards
show
how
life
can
 sometimes
not
be
fair.
The
Yale
key
represents
 how
Christina
could
have
grown
up
to
be
a
Yale
 graduate
and
the
snake
charm
shows
that
 something
could
always
go
wrong.
I
represented
 the
freshmen
with
childlike
elements
and
the
 community
with
adult‐like
elements
to
show
 how
difficult
it
was
for
the
freshmen
to
act
like
 adults,
but
they
seemed
to
do
this
almost
 effortlessly.
They
keep
her
alive
and
in
their
 hearts
by
telling
her
story.

 
 
 
 
 


 —Haley
Nelson

  • My
box
represents
how
I
used
violence
to
 demand
respect
for
me
and
my
mother.
Two
 high
school
females
carelessly
and
blatantly
 disrespected
my
mom
by
calling
her
names
 because
of
how
she
looked
due
to
chemo
and
 radiation
treatments.
I
later
realized
from
my
 mother
that
you
cannot
command
respect
 from
others
just
because
they
fear
you;
it’s
 something
that
has
to
be
earned
not
taken.
 I
chose
to
go
with
a
smaller
box
because
you
 don’t
need
the
big
objects
to
draw
your
 audience
in;
you
can
use
smaller
objects
to
 make
them
focus
on
great
details
in
your
 story.
The
pink
camo
paper
represents
Breast
 Cancer
Awareness;
the
pink
fuzzy
heart
 shows
my
unconditional
love
for
my
mom;
 the
ribbon
is
a
constant
reminder
that
we
 need
to
find
a
cure;
and
the
silver
chain
 shows
that
she
is
a
survivor
and
a
fighter
and
 beat
this
illness. 

 
 
 
—Sharyon
Williams

  • This
box
allowed
me
to
express
my
feelings
on
respect
through
using
my
own
experiences.

 Those
experiences
are
what
shaped
me
as
a
person
and
by
designing
this
box
I
could
show
my
 story
through
figures
and
symbols.
I
enjoyed
creating
something
that
had
meaning.


 After
finishing
I
had
insights
regarding
my
brother.
The
autistic
awareness
symbols
made
me
 feel
good
about
what
I
am
doing.
I
printed
out
a
blank
autistic
puzzle
piece
and
put
Tanner’s
 name
in
it,
to
represent
him
as
a
kid
with
autism.
He
might
be
autistic
but
he
has
changed
my
 life,
and
created
a
great
atmosphere
for
kids
with
similar
disabilities.

Thanks
to
what
Tanner
 has
given
me,
I
will
try
my
best
to
make
this
world
a
better
place
for
kids
with
autism.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Hunter
Niles

  • Respect
is
somewhat
of
an

 abstract
concept.
Pinpointing
the

 exact
meaning
is
nearly
impossible.
 From
my
experiences,
respect
is
 something
that
is
earned,
not
handed
 out,
and
because
of
this
not
everybody
 earns
respect.

 Other
than
the
goal
posts
that
help
 more
realistically
display
a
football
field,
 there
is
nothing
but
a
green
field
on

 my
box.
I
created
only
a
field
because
 regardless
of
everything
going
on
in

 your
life,
the
field
is
where
respect

 was
earned
or
gained.
It
is
where

 people
revealed
their
heart
and
 character.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Nicholas
Park


  • Respect
is
what
everyone
should
be
 treated
with
all
the
time.
This
is
exactly
 what
my
high
school
did
not
show
me
 when
I
was
ill.
I
received
all
F’s
because
 they
didn’t
believe
that
I
was
sick
and
this
 resulted
in
me
dropping
out.
 The
F’s
written
in
red
sharpie
symbolize
the
 grades
my
high
school
gave
me
when
I
was
 sick.
In
addition,
the
stickers
illustrate
that

 I
went
from
having
A’s
to
receiving
all
F’s.

 I
also
used
blue
and
green
colored
tape
to
 make

plus,
minus,
and
equals
sign
to
show
 that
my
experience
revolved
around
 school.
Finally,
the
wire
that
I
used
to
seal
 the
lid
symbolizes
how
close
I
hold
this
 experience
and
how
it
helped
me
become
 the
person
I
am
today.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 —John
Szalwinski

  • My
work
is
about
respect
between
 brother
and
sister.
My
sister,
Jennifer,
kept
a
 secret
about
her
hair
being
messed
around
 with.
My
sister
only
gave
me
hints
that
she
 was
being
bullied,
but
she
never
told
me.
 Creating
this
box
was
more
difficult
than
I
 thought
it
would
be.
“Anh
n
Em”
means
 brother
and
sister
in
Vietnamese.
The
box
 has
black
and
yellow
ribbons,
which
 represents
the
light
and
darkness
of
the
 story.
There
are
two
of
each
items
on
the
 box.
There
is
one
that
is
bigger
than
the
 other.
The
bigger
one
represents
me
and
 the
smaller
represents
my
sister.
The
star
 represents
that
my
sister
is
a
special
person
 to
me.
The
material
used
to
hold
the
items
 together
is
the
glue,
which
represents
the
 strong
hold
or
bond
between
us.

 
 
 
—
Brandon
Nguyen

  • I
felt
as
though
I
was
walking
around
 with
a
ball

and
chain
attached
to
my
 foot.
The
card
with
an
8
on
it
 represents
my
lucky
number.
It
is
is
 ripped
in
half

showing
that
my
luck
is
 no
more.
There
is
a
love
note
with
the
 words
“I
love
you”
on
it.
A
girl
I
had
 strong
feelings
for
ripped
my
love
 poems
that
I
had
written
to
her
into
 pieces
in
front
of
my
face.
The
rusty
key
 represents
the
key
to

the
future
that

 I
must
find
in
order
to
achieve
my
true
 happiness.
Last
but
not
least
is
the

 tesla
coil
standing
perfectly
erect
in

 the
center
overlooking
everything.
It

 is
a
symbol
being
more
powerful
than
 the
rest.
It
shows
that
I
have
the
power
 to
take
charge
of
who
I
really
am
and
 knowing
who
I
really
am
is
half
the
 battle
to
being
happy.



 
 
 
—Devon
Avery

  • Starting
with
a
blank
cardboard
box
 can
be
difficult.
As
I
sifted
through
the
 immense
amounts
of
materials,
I
found
 the
gray,
gleaming
ribbon.
I
used
this
 ribbon
to
represent
brain
cancer.
I
 folded
the
ribbon
in
the
shape
of
a
 typical
cancer
ribbon.
Then
I
set
the
 chain
up
in
a
“Z”
figure,
making
the
box
 appear
locked.
The
overall
use
of
the
 color
gray
represents
the
color
of
brain
 cancer,
which
my
dear
friend,
Sam,
had.
 To
some,
gray
is
a
very
neutral
color.
It
 doesn’t
take
sides.

 My
box
holds
the
type
of
respect
Sam
 and
her
family
shared
with
the
world.
 The
chain
locks
my
box
and
protects
 this
kind
of
respect
because
it
is
a
 beautiful
thing.
The
key
can
be
seen
as
 the
“key
to
respect.”
The
star
represents
 Sam’s
soccer
team,
the
Stars
of
 Massachusetts
and
the
fact
that
she
 was
a
star
in
all
aspects
of
life.
 —Sydney
Stengel


  • Five years ago my family moved from Florida to a small town in New Hampshire. I went from having a lot of close friends living nearby to none. The same day we moved in we met our neighbors and their son, Eli, was my first new friend. In middle school and high school, people complained about how they did not like him. It always annoyed me because it came from people who barely knew him. At my family’s Christmas party last year, my aunt’s brother-in-law’s heart stopped. We all watched him go from being fine to dying in a matter of seconds. My friend ran next door to get his father, an EMT. During the whole situation Eli did what he could to help. Even though I never questioned why I was friends with him, that night made me respect him and appreciate being friends with him a whole lot more. —Andrew Toscano
  • Life
gives
some
kids
challenges
they
cannot
get
through
alone.
The
Make‐A‐Wish
Foundation
of
 VT
&
NH
strives
to
make
their
dreams
come
true.
I
play
in
the
All‐Star
Hockey
Classic,
one
of
 their
fundraisers.
At
the
game
I
was
interviewed
by
a
reporter
who
kept
interrupting
me
when
I
 tried
to
tell
him
my
brother
was
my
reason
for
playing,
not
the
rivalry
between
two
states.

 Gold
has
always
seemed
like
a
color
that
would
represent
respect,
as
it
is
bright
and
as
gold
as
 the
stars
in
the
sky
that
symbolize
dreams
and
wishes.
This
gold
can
also
be
applied
to
the
 brightness
of
the
video
camera,
which
seemed
to
glare
at
me
as
I
was
being
interviewed.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Jenna
Lancour

  • I
never
truly
respected
officials
because
of
how
 easy
it
was
for
them
to
completely
change
the
 outcome
of
a
game
with
one
call.
But
my
father
 urged
me
to
learn
how
to
umpire.

Since
I
knew
 pretty
much
everything
there
was
to
know
about
 baseball,
I
had
some
confidence
prior
to
umpiring
 my
first
game.
But
I
made
a
few
terrible
calls
and
 was
the
most
hated
person
in
the
Moosup
Little
 League
complex
that
afternoon.

 The
large
plastic
eyes
represent
how
my
eyes
 were
opened
to
how
hard
it
is
to
be
an
umpire.
 The
eyes
also
represent
how
blind
I
was
in
missing
 several
obvious
calls.
“Boo!!!”
and
“You
suck!”
 represent
phrases
coming
from
outraged
parents.
 The
mustache
represents
my
wish
to
be
incognito.
 I
ripped
a
dollar
in
half
in
order
to
symbolize
how
 little
umpires
get
paid
for
what
they
endure.
 Putting
myself
in
their
shoes
opened
up
my
eyes
 and
impacted
my
baseball
career
significantly.
 Now
I
give
them
respect,
and
they
give
me
 respect.

 
 
 
 
 
—Gage
Griffin

  • To
see
interviews
on
respect

 conducted
by

 Franklin
Pierce
students

 please
visit www.YouTube.com/user/HeatherTullio