William Kilbride

268 views
242 views

Published on

Presented as part of "Realising the Opportunities of Digital Humanities" (#RODH2012)

Oct 23-25, 2012, Ireland.

More info: www.dri.ie/programme

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
268
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

William Kilbride

  1. 1. Realising the Potential ofthe Digital Humanities Potential is long-term Potential is distributed Impact needs long-term thinking Impact needs capacity to link Why do we need to save the bits? www.dpconline.org
  2. 2. Digital preservation typically makes bleak reading … <Enter your details here> ………………………………………… ………………………………………… ………………………………………… www.dpconline.org
  3. 3. Let’s restate the problem …•Digital stuff has value. It is an asset.•It has potential and creates new opportunities.•Use gives rise to direct and indirect outcomes....but...•Deployment depends on software, hardware and people.•Software, hardware and people change....therefore...•Access is not guaranteed without (some) action•Value, opportunity, impact not guaranteed www.dpconline.org
  4. 4. Let’s restate the problem …•Data loss is not necessarily a problem...but...•Data loss should not be led by coincidental obsolescence…in other words…•Digital preservation means we can delete confidently www.dpconline.org
  5. 5. Why Digital Preservation?Digital preservation is not just about ‘data’:Safer SmarterDigital preservation is not just about ‘access’:Digital preservation is not just about ‘re-use’:It’s about Healthierpeople and WealthieropportunityGreener Fairer www.dpconline.org
  6. 6. Has Kilbride lost his marbles?What’s the connection between allthis infrastructure and changingthe world? www.dpconline.org
  7. 7. 1. Transparent e.g. Data Protection, Freedom of Information … childcare, human tissueWhy preserve in the 2. Saferpublic sector … e.g. preparedness, detection, disaster, recovery, audit 3. Smarter e.g. access to heritage, social knowledge, innovation, research, connected 4. Wealthier e.g. more efficient, exploitation of IP, skills, surrogate access 5. Healthier e.g. managed life history, research and safe innovation, identity, heritage 6. Greener e.g. environmental policy development, efficient retention www.dpconline.org
  8. 8. 1. Legal Compliance e.g. Sarbanes-Oxley, Data Protection 2. Regulatory ComplianceWhy preserve for e.g. power generation, aviation, banking, pharmaceuticalsbusiness? 3. Legal protection e.g. patents, mis-selling, detection, audit 4. Unanticipated exploitation e.g. petro-chemical, music, broadcast 5. Business continuity and improvement e.g. product recall, disaster recovery 6. Business Value e.g. getting the right information to the right people at the right time in a format they can use www.dpconline.org
  9. 9. What are the benefitsof preservation? It can be hard be hard to see the wood from the trees No access without (some) preservation No preservation without (some) access But what’s the value? Keeping Research Data Safe http://www.beagrie.com/krds.php www.dpconline.org
  10. 10. Value of digital objects …vsValue of booksvsValue of museum objectsvsValue of archivesvsValue of the historic environmentVsValue of core business data www.dpconline.org
  11. 11. What’s a collection worth anyway? www.dpconline.org
  12. 12. Digital preservation can feel likean unfunded mandateNeed to articulate valueNeed to embed withinsocial, cultural, organisationalmission www.dpconline.org
  13. 13. And we could always do nothing… <Enter your details here> ………………………………………… ………………………………………… ………………………………………… …and spend that money over and over again www.dpconline.org
  14. 14. Realising the Potential ofthe Digital HumanitiesMany benefitsBenefits are real world and significantButWe need to articulate valueDP needs to be ‘business as usual’ william@dpconline.org @williamkilbride www.dpconline.org

×