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Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift
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Content Marketing Strategies Conference: David Smith Content Generation & Distribution-The Seismic Shift

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The 2011 Content Marketing Strategies Conference (contentmarketing2011.com) had some amazing speakers and lively conversation. This is one great example. Continue the conversation at …

The 2011 Content Marketing Strategies Conference (contentmarketing2011.com) had some amazing speakers and lively conversation. This is one great example. Continue the conversation at twitter.com/content2011.

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  • 1. Content Generation & Distribution<br />The Seismic Shift<br />
  • 2. Past and Present<br />Historically, content and journalism has been inextricably linked… <br />…Is the future of journalism and the future of content intertwined?<br />
  • 3. The Significance of Journalism<br />Journalism has performed a great service for society, and will always be needed<br />“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”<br />-Thomas Jefferson<br />
  • 4. One More Quote…<br />“A journalist is a grumbler, a censurer, a giver of advice, a regent of sovereigns, a tutor of nations. Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets.”<br />-Napoleon Bonaparte<br />From Heat and Light: Advice for the Next Generation of Journalists <br />By Mike Wallace and Beth Knobel<br />
  • 5. The Lay of The Land<br /><ul><li>Newspapers and magazines are folding in droves</li></ul>Costs start to outstrip their revenues<br /><ul><li>Almost every print publication is shrinking</li></ul>Fewer and fewer readers are willing to pay for something they can get for free on the Internet <br /><ul><li>Network television, too, is attracting fewer and fewer viewers to its news programs</li></li></ul><li>Journalism’s Constant Unique Power<br />Here are a few modern examples…<br /><ul><li>Edward R. Murrow: brought down McCarthy who was destroying people's lives by accusing them of being Communists
  • 6. Walter Cronkite: helped bring down Vietnam when he said after visiting there in 1968 that the war was unwinnable
  • 7. Woodward and Bernstein: Watergate
  • 8. Egypt: real time reporting in the current crisis (a combination of Journalism and Social Networks)</li></li></ul><li>60 Minutes Changed Journalism<br /><ul><li>Bill Paley built CBS News on a premise that it did not have to make money
  • 9. Yet 60 Minutes did so in such a way that it made news a profitable venture in broadcast
  • 10. And as a result, large news organizations were built out profitably
  • 11. But the technology of the Internet has the risk of bringing all of that down</li></li></ul><li>The Future of Journalism<br /><ul><li>The vast majority of print publications will no longer print hard copies
  • 12. All media will change
  • 13. News on demand will become the rule
  • 14. News will become more focused and more personalized
  • 15. Multitasking will be the norm</li></li></ul><li>The Future of Journalism (cont.)<br /><ul><li>Technology will continue to drive news coverage
  • 16. Information overload will be omnipresent
  • 17. Trusted providers will still be important
  • 18. News will still made by people
  • 19. Content comes from everyone, not just journalists
  • 20. Resources matter</li></li></ul><li>Pressure on the Financial Model<br /><ul><li>Brought on by the low or no pay factors like Demand Media, HuffPo and others
  • 21. The long tail of publishing and news will cut into some organization’s ability to survive
  • 22. But resources and brands providing the content matter, and always will</li></li></ul><li>Some Good News<br /><ul><li>According to Reason Magazine:</li></ul>Before the merger, AOL, already employed 900 journalists, or more than the L.A. Times does now<br />Gawker Media, reportedly employs 130 people<br />SB Nation, a sports blog network has a reported 410 paid writers<br /><ul><li>So the question is… Are there really fewer jobs in journalism or less total journalist compensation?</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>It used to be words on a page
  • 23. But that changed with radio, then the movie newsreels, then TV and now with the Web and social media 
  • 24. Content is
  • 25. Words
  • 26. Music
  • 27. Video
  • 28. Games
  • 29. Entertainment
  • 30. Applications
  • 31. Data
  • 32. And much more</li></ul>What Is Content?<br />
  • 33. Is There An Effect?<br /><ul><li>How content is being generated and how it is being consumed is undergoing a drastic change
  • 34. Do these drastic changes affect understanding?
  • 35. Andrew Heywood of CBS…</li></ul>“Research by CBS among teens and pre teens showed that even though few of them finished a single article or show about a current events topic, they snacked from enough sources to have an amazingly complete picture of the overall issues. He calls this Media Impressionism.”<br />
  • 36. Your Old Models Are Rapidly Changing<br /><ul><li>Publishers with specific dates</li></ul>Agency mindset has been on monthly scheduling and bars on a flow chart<br />Publishers survive on edit calendars<br /><ul><li>We are in an “always on” dialogue with the consumer</li></ul>Bars on a flow chart with hiatus periods do not work any more<br />
  • 37. New Models<br /><ul><li>Articles become available when written, edited, curated and posted onto content server
  • 38. e.g., WSJ on iPad, SkyGrid, Google News</li></li></ul><li>New Models (cont.)<br /><ul><li>Published centrally vs. shared via social (push vs. pull)
  • 39. Informal posting of news via various feeds on Facebook, Twitter, etc.
  • 40. Central curation by “friends” as curators
  • 41. e.g., Flipboard</li></li></ul><li>Aggregators and Social Distribution<br /><ul><li>Aggregators ranging from Skygrid to Pulse to Yahoo! will continue to be a threat to content providers 
  • 42. Brands will also serve as content generators
  • 43. Some brands will have their own APIs</li></ul>RSS and Twitter feeds are an early example of this<br /><ul><li>Twitter feeds
  • 44. Facebook pages</li></li></ul><li>Summary<br /><ul><li>Content providers will be increasingly pressured by low paying competitors
  • 45. It will take more than high quality for the current providers to survive </li></ul>They must change the way that they do business with everything from technology to format to timing of release to how they deal with distribution through syndicators and aggregators<br /><ul><li>But the public will continue to consume more content than ever</li></ul>And they will snack on a lot of different options<br />
  • 46. The Hope<br />“Television saved the movies. The Internet is going to save the news business.” <br />Matt Drudge (The Drudge Report)<br />
  • 47. Thank You!<br />David L. Smith <br />Founder & CEO, Mediasmith<br />smith@mediasmith.com<br />Twitter: @mediadls<br />

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