Development Management And The Political Economy Of Africa’S Renewal

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Presentation on PhD thesis of Aderemi Oladele

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Development Management And The Political Economy Of Africa’S Renewal

  1. 1. DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT AND THE POLITICAL-ECONOMY OF AFRICA’S RENEWAL: Towards Assessable Local Impacts of Evolving International Development Norms and Policy-drive A presentation on the PhD Dissertation of : OLADELE O. Aderemi Centre d'Études Diplomatiques et Stratégiques, École des Hautes Études Internationales, Paris 18 June, 2009 ___________________________ Examiners: Dr. Christina AGUIAR Dr. Emmanuel CAULIER   Dr. Michael LEBEDEV Dr. Fouad NOHRA
  2. 2. DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT AND THE POLITICAL-ECONOMY OF AFRICA’S RENEWAL:Towards Assessable Local Impacts of Evolving International Development Norms and Policy-drive Assessable Evolving Development Norms INTRODUCTION • MOTVATION • RESEARCH/WRITING PHASE CHALLENGES • PLAN • SUMMARY OF CHAPTERS • CONCLUSION
  3. 3. MOTIVATION • Quest for: – Effective alternatives to « begging-pot politics » and « Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose » in Africa’s socio-economic and development planning; – The need to move from rhetoric to more impacting action in development debates for Africa; – Progressive insight to what works and what could work at the collective level of development planning and execution in Africa; and which will also – Have impact on country level response to changing local demands for practicability and adaptability; – Need to relate to the fact that the debate on who caused the problem is not as important as who will fix it and how to fix it efficiently;
  4. 4. RESEARCH/WRITING PHASE CHALLENGES • Choice between a practical manual and the prefix of a thesis supported with many theories • Classifying development management as a discipline: sounds general as to what every development practitioner does • Documentation: few academic precedents of publications on development management • Writing plan dilemma: maintaining a balance between chapters devoted to explaining the concept and those on the Africa’s perspectives
  5. 5. PLAN • Work divided into 3 Parts; and sub-divided into • 9 chapters (3 chapters for each parts) • PART I UNDERSTANDING DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: Definition, Dynamics and Highlights on the African Challenge and Viccisitude • PART II EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT • PART III PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA
  6. 6. PART I UNDERSTANDING DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: Definition, Dynamics and Highlights on the African Challenge and Viccisitude • CONCEPTION OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT – First introduced by donor agencies and NGOs working in developing countries – Businesslike approach/Emphasis on results rather than procedure: from administration to management – Development manager is responsive, disciplined, flexible and constrained by the parametres of development itself – Combine external expertise with local knowledge and skills; by – Employing external resources in the service of indigenous direct endeavours – Dynamism: Institutional Agenda, tool, process and value phases
  7. 7. PART I UNDERSTANDING DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: Definition, Dynamics and Highlights on the African Challenge and Viccisitude • FACTORS THAT SHAPED DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT – Globalization – Sustainable Development – Africa Vs Western Globalization • DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT AS LEVERAGE – Sustainable Development-The Global Scenario on Sustainable Development – Cultural Diversity and Development Practice
  8. 8. PART II EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT • GLOBAL GOVERNANCE AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT – International Organizations – Organogramme of Development Management • Policy Generation and standard setting • Technical aid and cooperation • Development financing/funding
  9. 9. PART II EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT • LEGAL FRAMEWORK AND UN DIPLOMACY OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT/THE BIRTH OF PRAGMATIC DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE – The Road from Stockholm to Rio – The MDGs and Timeline Policy Making – From Bretton Woods to Limits to Growth – Failure and Promise of Global Governance and the New International Development Agenda • Limits to target and legally binding comitments or burden sharing • Defining priority for the poor in securing of national political will • Finding innovative ways for public/private partnership
  10. 10. PART II EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT • PRIORITY AFRICA – MDGs and the African Poverty Reduction Case Study – UN Reform and Africa Priority: descentralization and Result-Based Management – doing it with the people and not for them – Case of the Clean Development Mechanism
  11. 11. PART III PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA • SHAPING OF AFRICA’S DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT – Structural Adjustment Effects • one –size-fits-all • Caused economic decline and depression in the 80s – Institutional Framework of Development Management and the Decline of Quality Delivery • Nationalization and public cooperation’s high importance • Political, social and financial barriers – Effects of corruption and inefficiency • Interwoven effects that results in blockage of positivepolicy implementation • Success of development depends largely on dealing with the duo
  12. 12. PART III PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA • RESHAPING AFRICA’S INSTITUTIONS: OWNERSHIP AND REFORMS AS TOOLS – Logic of Ownership and Development Management • Do it with the people and not for them • Development process needs to engender psycological ownership of culture • Needs to develop clients capacity to solve their own problems • Client know more about their own situation than the donor agency or consultant ever will – Political and Public Service Reforms: Nature and Progress Evaluation • Progress from Military to Civilian Rule • Increased Political Competition; but • Neo-Partimonialism Persists – New Public Management Paradigm • 1946 – 1982 : Public Sector Reform at the margins • 1983 – 1989: Focus on quality of governance • 1990 – 1996: increase awareness of governance agenda • 1997 – 2007: Public Sector Reform efforts become central, include anti-corruption
  13. 13. PART III PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA • NEPAD, THE PUBLIC SECTOR AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA – NEPAD’s Original Objectives • establish conditions for sustainable development (including peace and security and improved governance) • identification of priority sectors that could reverse the marginalization of Africa • mobilization of resources from within and outside the continent for effective implementation of policies, programmes and projects • Emphasis on the MDGs achievement – Critics of NEPAD and the APRM • Wade’s comment of June 2007 that NEPAD achieves nothing but waist • APRM limited in Checks • Ian Taylor (2005) on governance problem, clientelism, corruption and unwilingness of leader to work with NGOs will creep into NEPAD’s Management – African Public Service Innovation Award: Is that all?
  14. 14. CONCLUSION • Responsibility as Driving Force – All eyes on Africa – Results depend on the efficacy, speed and inspiration of local initiatives – Trust of the International community should drive African leadership • Strategic Planning - There is an urgent need for reclassifying the roles and inter-relationship of NEPAD and the AU – NEPAD as well as states’ institutions need results-based management approach - to results « Results » over « Outputs » – NEPAD must focus more on policy generation and technical assistance to States rather than direct involvement in implementation – As strategy, NEPAD must accelerate the involvement of NGOs and the private sector for father reach to locals and customized initiatives • On Values and Continuity: – Correcting negative values of corruption, neopatrimonialism as integrated strategy – Customized models/ building on indigenous strategies rather than stereotype external models as example – Political reform in Africa is not complete until political corruption is totally erradicated • Creating enabling environment in States requires: – Complete change in negative norms of the political class as short-term approach – Breeding a new generation of positive value minded political class as long-term solution – Incentives of civil servants must be competitive with those of the private sector and their political counterparts

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