Searching the Web

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Presentation given at the 2004 CPA convention in Washington, DC

Presentation given at the 2004 CPA convention in Washington, DC

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  • I’ve been with CNS for 10 years. I have an IR background and now love being a news librarian. Cassandra came to CNS from National Geographic. She has an MLS from the University of Maryland. She will be going to SLA in two weeks to conference seminars that will address similar things- keeping professional connections and keeping current with issues of searching, misinformation and new and improved resources benefits the entire industry of the Catholic Press. Being a couple of the only librarians/archivists in the CPA we are glad to guide and advise you on these topics.

Transcript

  • 1. Searching the Web Tricks and Treats? Presented by Katherine Nuss & Cassandra Shieh Catholic News Service Library & Information Services
  • 2. Objectives
    • 1. Help you develop better Web search skills
        • Use the right tools for finding various types of information
        • Create good search strategies & queries
    • 2. Provide tips on how to evaluate and critique information found on the Web
        • Guide for evaluating Web sites
        • Identify misinformation on the Web
        • Be more selective when choosing sources of information available on the Web
  • 3. What is the Web?
    • collection of graphical pages on the Internet that can be read and interacted with by computer
    • Consists of pages authored by reputable publishers of information and “anyone with a computer and a modem, requiring no editing or checking for factual accuracy”
      • [From: Netlingo.com ( http://www.netlingo.com/lookup.cfm?term=Internet ) & Anne P. Mintz, editor. Web of Deception: Misinformation on the Internet . Information Today, Inc., 2002, p. xvii.]
  • 4. How do we find relevant information on the Web?
  • 5. Web Search Tools
    • Search engines
    • Metasearch engines
    • Web subject directories
    • Library portals
  • 6. Search Engines
  • 7. Metasearch Engines
  • 8. Web Subject Directories
  • 9. Library Portals
    • Librarians’ Index (LII)
    • InfoMine (UCR)
    • Power Reporting
    • PoynterOnline’s Resource Center
    • Marquette University Library’s subject index
    • Library of Congress’ Federal Research Division’s Country Studies
  • 10. Search Engine Myths
    • Search engines provide a comprehensive coverage of the Web.
    • All search engines are created equal.
    • There is much overlap in search engine coverage.
    • If I can’t find it in Google, then it doesn’t exist on the Web.
    • A search engine’s index is always current.
    • Search engines automatically sort results by relevance.
    • If you found a Web page once using a search engine, you’ll find it again.
    [Chris Sherman and Gary Price. The Invisible Web: Uncovering Information Sources Search Engines Can’t See . Information Today, Inc., 2001.]
  • 11. Devise Search Strategy DEFINE YOUR QUESTION SELECT INFORMATION SOURCE FORMULATE QUERY PERFORM SEARCH RECORD RESULTS & STRATEGY EVALUATE RESULTS
  • 12. QUICK Web Search Tips
    • ALWAYS ask yourself where you would most likely find type of information? Then go straight to the source.
    • Select most appropriate type of search vehicle
    • ALWAYS type more than one word in the query field
    • Remember to use advanced search features
    • Search for words that should be on a web page, not broad keywords
    • Frustrated? Seek help. Contact a librarian.
  • 13. Beyond Search Engines: What is the Invisible Web?
      • “ Text pages, files, or other often high-quality authoritative information available via the World Wide Web that general-purpose search engines cannot, due to technical limitations, or will not, due to deliberate choice, add to their indices of Web pages. Sometimes also referred to as the ‘Deep Web’ or ‘dark matter.’ “
    [Chris Sherman and Gary Price. The Invisible Web: Uncovering Information Sources Search Engines Can’t See . Information Today, Inc., 2001, p. 57.]
  • 14. Beyond Search Engines: How to Find Content on the Invisible Web
    • Pay attention to links found on Web sites from Government agencies, academic institutions, and other organizations
    • Use industry gateways/portals
    • Check resource links in library guides
    • Build a favorites/bookmark list of Web sites you find
  • 15. Misinformation on the Web
    • Beware of agenda-driven sites
    • Opinions stated as fact can be dangerous
    • Errors get repeated in news sources
    • Scrutinize methodology and source of statistics – identify bias, if any
    • Always question, compare and verify
    Mintz, Anne P. (editor) Web of Deception: Misinformation on the Internet . Information Today, Inc., 2002.
  • 16. Evaluating Web Sites
    • Know how to spot unreliable sites
    • Check URL for clues
    • Site sponsors: Is site bombarded with advertising?
    • Is the site frequently linked to or reviewed?
    • Use authoritative portals to check on sites
    • Follow 5 Criteria for Evaluating Web sites
  • 17. Web Site Evaluation Criteria
    • Accuracy
    • Authority
    • Objectivity
    • Currency
    • Coverage
    [From Kapoun, Jim. “Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction.” C&RL News, July/Aug. 1998, v. 59, #7. http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crlnews/backissues1998/julyaugust6/teachingundergrads.htm ]
  • 18. Evaluation Criteria #1
    • ACCURACY
      • Who is the author of the site?
      • Can you contact him/her?
      • Are the author’s credentials listed?
      • What’s the purpose of the document?
      • Is the information presented as fact accurate?
  • 19. Evaluation Criteria #2
    • AUTHORITY
      • Who is the publisher of the document?
      • Publisher’s credentials?
      • What’s the reputation of the publisher?
      • Check URL domain.
      • Are they experts in the field?
  • 20. Evaluation Criteria #3
    • OBJECTIVITY
      • What are the goals/objectives for the page/site?
      • How detailed is the information?
      • What opinions (if any) are expressed by the author?
      • Is there an information bias?
  • 21. Evaluation Criteria #4
    • CURRENCY
      • When was the document produced?
      • When was it updated?
      • How up-to-date are its links?
      • Are there dead links present?
      • Does the information appear to be outdated?
  • 22. Evaluation Criteria # 5
    • COVERAGE
      • Are the links evaluated and do they complement the subject of the document?
      • Is the information presented cited correctly?
      • Is there a fee to obtain the information or is it free?
  • 23. Ethics & the Web
    • Copyright laws do apply to Web documents as much as they apply to print documents
    • Read a Web page’s copyright statements carefully – don’t just click through it
    • Follow copyright permission request instructions
    • Use of material should always be credited and cited accurately
    • See CPA’s “Fair Publishing Practices Code” (revised May 2004)
  • 24. Other Resources for Journalists
    • Print reference books (almanacs, encyclopedias, directories, dictionaries)
    • News media (diocesan/secular newspapers, television/video programming, radio broadcasts & transcripts)
    • Government Sources (agencies, reports, stats)
    • Academic Institutions
    • Organizations & Associations
  • 25. QUESTIONS? Contact us at CNS: Katherine Nuss Cassandra Shieh [email_address] 202-541-3286/3254
  • 26. Presentation Bibliography
    • Bates, Mary Ellen. Mining for Gold on the Internet: How to Find Investment and Financial Information on the Internet . McGraw-Hill, 2000.
    • Hane, Paula J. Super Searchers in the News: The Online Secrets of Journalists and News Researchers. Information Today, Inc., 2000.
    • Kapoun, Jim. “Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction.” C&RL News, July/Aug. 1998, v. 59, #7. [Accessed 5/20/04 from: http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crlnews/backissues1998/julyaugust6/teachingundergrads.htm ]
    • Mintz, Anne P. (editor) Web of Deception: Misinformation on the Internet . Information Today, Inc., 2002.
    • Notess, Greg R. “Internet Search Techniques and Strategies,” ONLINE , July 1997. [Accessed 5/20/04 from: http://www.onlinemag.net/JulOL97/net7.html ]
  • 27. Presentation Bibliography Notess, Greg R. Search Engine Showdown: The Users’ Guide to Web Searching. [Accessed 5/20/04 from: http:// www.searchengineshowdown.com ] “ Pandia’s 17 Recommendations for Net Searching.” Pandia’s Internet Search Tutorial, [Accessed 5/20/04 from: http:// www.pandia.com/goalgetter/recommendations.html ] Sherman, Chris and Gary Price. The Invisible Web: Uncovering Information Sources Search Engines Can’t See . Information Today, 2001. [ http://www.invisible-web.net ] Sullivan, Danny (editor) and Chris Sherman (associate editor). Search Engine Watch . [Accessed 5/20/04 from: http:// www.searchenginewatch.com ]