Developing Young Authors with Storybird

4,982 views
4,944 views

Published on

Storybirds are short, art-inspired stories you make to share, read, and print. It is a fun, collaborative, storytelling website that can be an effective resource for teaching parts of a story, the writing process, promoting creativity, and more. Storybird also seamlessly keeps a portfolio of each student's writing development.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,982
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2,794
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Developing Young Authors with Storybird

  1. 1. Developing Young Authors with Storybird Clif Mims clifmims.com
  2. 2. Clif Mims clifmims.com clifmims.com/connect Connect and let’s learn together.
  3. 3. All materials are available online: bit.ly/mims202
  4. 4. Examples
  5. 5. Guided Tour
  6. 6. Gift of Time
  7. 7. Mrs. Patterson Classroom Examples and Uses
  8. 8. Noteworthy • FREE! • It requires minimal teacher preparation time.
  9. 9. Noteworthy • Educators should sign up for the Teacher accounts. Teacher accounts allow you to setup classes and administer student accounts. – Alleviates the necessity for student email accounts. – Makes it possible for children under 13 to legally have accounts.
  10. 10. Noteworthy • Educators should sign up for the Teacher accounts. Teacher accounts allow you to setup classes and administer student accounts. – Storybird has safeguards for child online safety built into it. Teacher accounts also help you with this. – Student work can be made public or private. – Teachers can setup assignments with directions and deadlines that students will see. – Teachers can specify that students use a particular art gallery for an assignment.
  11. 11. Noteworthy • The use of the artwork can prompt reluctant writers and encourage deep reflection and higher-order thinking. • Students can benefit from writing for an audience.
  12. 12. A Few Curriculum Connections • Promote early writing -- even with student created wordless picture books. • Sequencing • Main idea • Elements of a story • Propaganda techniques • Practice with a variety of writing genres (persuasive writing, mysteries, poetry, etc.)
  13. 13. Sharing • What tips do you recommend? • Will you be making any changes?
  14. 14. Teachers Can Use Storybird: • To introduce themselves or the class rules on the first day of school and at parent night. • To create lessons and tutorials about any topic. • As an easy strategy for keeping a portfolio of student writing. • To promote the writing process. • To help students better understand the parts of a story. • To encourage higher-order thinking skills (HOTS). • To promote creativity. • To collaborate with students, colleagues, and other classrooms.
  15. 15. Students Can Use Storybird: • To write an About Me story the first week of school. • As an alternative strategy for submitting research reports, book reports, and essays. • For journal reflections. • To create gifts for loved ones. • To collaborate with others inside and outside of the classroom.
  16. 16. Download here.
  17. 17. Presentation materials and many other teacher resources available at http://clifmims.com/pd.
  18. 18. Clif Mims clifmims.com clifmims.com/connect Connect and let’s learn together.
  19. 19. clifmims.com/ccl

×