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Week 11 Work effectively
 

Week 11 Work effectively

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Week 11 Work effectively Week 11 Work effectively Presentation Transcript

  • CHCRF301E Work effectively with families to care for the child
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns • Recap Week 10 19/9/2013 • Parents concerns • Following up on concerns • Dealing with problem situations CHC08 Community Services Training Package Learning Guide Pp 62 - 66
  • Parent's concerns There is no training available to become a parent. There is no training available that allows families to stop worrying if they are doing the right thing. However, there are correct ways for children's services staff to respond to families concerns. Q What could some of those concerns be? (list on whiteboard)
  • Parent's concerns • • • • • Is my child eating correctly? Are they getting enough sleep? Do they have enough friends? Are they accepted by their extended family? Does their teacher like or engage enough with them? • Do they feel good about themselves?
  • Parent's concerns • Parents will always have concerns over their child's welfare, particularly when they are separated during the day. • It is our role to communicate support to the families as they work through their concerns. • Some concerns may not relate to the care being provided.
  • Parent's concerns LETS LOOK AT THE NQS What would be the area that would be relevant to our investigations today?
  • Parent's concerns AGAIN, LETS LOOK AT THE NQS – in particular Quality Area 6 Standard 6.2 • Look specifically at 'About Standard 6.2' • And follow up with 'What we aim to achieve with Standard 6.2' on p 155.
  • Following up on concerns WHEN DEALING WITH CONCERNS IT IS IMPORTANT THAT WE - • Listen attentively and not interrupt the family member. Do not assume you know what they have to say. • Ensure body language is open and receptive • Use active listening and clarification statements to demonstrate your interest and understanding.
  • Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? • You may be feeling confronted and overwhelmed. • Even though you may not be able to resolve the problem, it is still important that the family feels they have been heard.
  • Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? (cont) • You may need to talk it over with someone – possibly to gain some new perception on the situation or to seek some information or advice. • Remember your confidentiality requirements. • So ensuring it stays 'in house' is important – a supervisor could be an appropriate person to talk to.
  • Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? (cont) • Families need to feel that they can trust you to take their concerns seriously and not dismiss them with a laugh or breach confidentiality as you talk it over with another family. • If the concern is over an issue regarding the service, what steps would you need to take in line with a possible procedure?
  • Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? • Some concerns you will be able to assist with. • Others will require a more qualified or senior staff member (even if you feel you may be able to deal with the issue). • It is important that you become aware of what types of concerns you can deal with vs what more qualified staff are expected to deal with.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns • Week 11 10/10/2013 • Dealing with problem situations (cont) • Looking at the big picture • Assumptions CHC08 Community Services Training Package Learning Guide Pp 66 - 72
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns “IT'S A PROBLEM....” • READ TO THE CLASS THE SCENARIO ON PAGE 66 – use as a discussion point.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • Most problems are easily solved. Yet others are not. • It is not always possible to have an answer on the spot. • Some concerns may need to be taken to staff meetings or to the owner/committee of management.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • How then, do we acknowledge the problem and communicate our commitment to working through it, without sounding like we are dismissing the concern or not taking it seriously?
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • ACTIVITY 1 Consider your response to the following... • 1) The children are encouraged to take responsibility for their environment. As part of the program, children are expected to assist in packing away at the conclusion of activities. Recently you have noticed that a small group of boys have been standing back and not participating in this pack away time. You have tried to encourage them but to no avail..Mohamed appears to be the most resistant to clean up time. You decide to approach his mother at the end of the day. Her response surprises you “Yes, I have been meaning to talk to you about this. My son is not expected to clean up. This is women's work and it is demeaning to him.''
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • What do you say? • How do you respect cultural views vs the rules of the service? • Debate • GROUP 1 IS FOR RESPECTING THE CULTURE OF THE FAMILY • GROUP 2 IS AGAINST THE CHILD NOT PACKING AWAY – AND WANTS TO FOLLOW THE POLICY OF THE SERVICE. • Using the knowledge you have gained in class write a list of dot points to debate your case and we will deliver a final solution in class.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • Your response could be... “I had not realised that this was a concern for your family, thank you for sharing this. Our pack away policy is one that we have spent a lot of time discussing at staff meetings. We had not considered your expectations. I would like to take your concerns back to our next staff meeting on Thursday and discuss pack away time further. We can then meet again, and talk about this”.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS ACTIVITY 2 (3.4) p67/68
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • Sometimes the concerns that are expressed to us are outside our area of expertise. When families grow to trust us they will share information – not always looking for a solution, but as a way to deal or understand a situation. • It is important to consider whether some of the roles you are expected to play are appropriate...
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • BE MINDFUL OF THE ROLES YOU TAKE ON. • Sometimes information given to us can be quite personal and has strong implications in terms of confidentiality. • For us the challenge then lies in assisting families in finding the help they need, without taking on this role ourselves.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • It can be tempting to talk about their concern for their child from our own experiences, but depending on the nature of this concern, this is not always appropriate. • You need to be comfortable about your own training – what this qualifies you for – and what it does not.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • When you talking to a parent, you do need to make them feel respected, and that they are being listened to. However, take note of the following key points 1) Acknowledge what has been said. Your role as a listener is to understand what is being said. Use any information to relate back to what is happening in the service with the child.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • 2) Decide whether this is a problem that is within your level of ability or whether a supervisor or outside referral is required. • 3) Take action if the situation is do-able. This could include having other educators at the service involved – or taking it to a staff meeting for further input.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns THE BIG PICTURE • 4) Agree to assist if possible (within the guidelines of your role). Even if referred to another agency, there may be ways to assist both the family and the agency. As, once the problem has been acknowledged, it is important for everyone concerned that it is worked through to the end.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns ASSUMPTIONS Let us have a look at the following DVD... • ECE PLP Have you thought about series... How do we understand cultural diversity? www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns ASSUMPTIONS • When we communicate with families, we need to be careful that we are not using an assumption based on their culture, age or linguistic background as a characteristic in the way we deal with them. Such assumptions can prove dangerous in the establishment of a partnership with families.
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns ASSUMPTIONS • Students can now view Speaking two languages a DVD from the Raising Children website www.raisingchildren.net.au – using the following links GROWNUPS/WORKINGWITHFAMILIES/DIFFERENTCULTURES/ DIFFERENT CULTURES VIDEOS Now, looking at video 2 – what are your comments?
  • Element 3 – Responding to a family's concerns ASSUMPTIONS • When families bring a concern to us, they are saying that they are trusting our judgement. They believe that we will be professional in taking their concern seriously. • Rather than feel anxious, we should feel pleased that families are comfortable enough to share and express concerns with us. • Even if we are not always in a position to answer concerns, we are in a position to assist & and listen so that they can get the help they need.