Mdro pct & non clinical final-January
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Mdro pct & non clinical final-January

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January

January

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Mdro pct & non clinical final-January Mdro pct & non clinical final-January Presentation Transcript

  • MDRO (Multiple drug-resistant organisms)
    What You Need to Know
    UT Southwestern University Hospitals: Infection Control Department
  • What is a Multi-drug Resistant Organism (MDRO)?
    Multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO’s) are germs which are not killed by many different antibiotics.
    Illness caused by MDROs cannot easily be cured by commonly used medicines.
    These germs are easily spread to other people.
    If a patient becomes sick from a MDRO, they stay longer in the hospital and are at a higher risk of dying.
  • MRSA: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    VRE : Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus
    Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter
    Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Klebsiella
    Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Enterobacter
    Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli
    C. Diff: Clostridium difficile
    Common MDROs and Their Abbreviations
  • Hands are the culprits
    MDROs are spread from one person to another on the hands.
    Hands become soiled when touching the patient to give care or when touching surfaces in the room which the patient or other care givers have touched.
    When hands are not washed or gown and gloves are not worn in Contact Isolation rooms, the MDRO is more likely to be passed to another patient.
  • WASH YOUR HANDS!
    Panel A: THE MRSA GREWAFTER NO HAND WASHING,
    Panel B: AFTER USING ALCOHOL FOAM TO WASH HANDS, NO MRSA GREW
    Donskey C and Eckstein B. N Engl J Med 2009;360:e3
  • Hand Hygiene
    Stop the Spread of Germs
    Hand washing is the single most important way to prevent the spread of disease
    Use soap and warm water
    Rub for15 seconds
    Alcohol-based products
    Wet hands with foam and rub in
    99% kill rate
    It has a persistent effect, and can continue to kill germs
    Use 6-8 times before washing with soap & water
    WASH YOUR HANDS—IT SAVES LIVES!
  • Touching the PATIENT isn’t the only way to get germs on your hand!
    MDROs live on the surfaces in the room where the patient and other care givers have touched.
  • How to Protect Your Patients, Yourself, and Your Family:
    Standard Precautions
    Standard Precautions are good hygiene practices which apply to all patients, whether they have a MDRO or not.
    Standard Precautions are in effect for all patients, all the time—24 hours/Day, 7 Days/Week.
    These include:
    Washing your hands before and after patient contact
    If coming in contact with body fluids, as needed, wear:
    Gloves
    Gown
    Mask
    Goggles or face shield
  • How to Protect Your Patients, Yourself, and Your Family:
    Standard Precautions
    Throw away used sharps promptly.
    Any equipment or items in the room which may have been soiled:
    Clean before using again, or
    Throw the item away
  • How to Know a Patient Has a MDRO
    Patients with a known MDRO will be placed in isolation
    There are 3 types of isolation:
    Contact
    Airborne
    Droplet
    A sign on the door will alert anyone entering the room of the isolation type
  • Good hand washing is the best way to stop the spread of germs.
    Contact Precautions may be added to prevent the bugs from being carried from one room to another on equipment or the hands of care givers.
    Contact Precautions
  • Contact Isolation Precautions
    A Green Contact Isolation sign will be on the room door.
    Any PERSON entering the room wears gloves and gown, no matter the reason for entering the room or for how long. This includes all staff and visitors.
  • Contact Isolation Precautions
    Remove the gloves and gown and wash hands BEFORE leaving the room.
    Equipment from a Contact Isolation room should be cleaned before being used in the care of another patient.
  • Contact Isolation Precautions Sign
  • Stop Sign for Clostridium difficile
    Contact Precautions
    +
    Use ONLY soap & water to wash hands
  • Droplet Precautions
    A Yellow/Orange Droplet Isolation sign will be on the room door.
    Surgical mask required for staff and visitors
    Surgical mask for patient if transport out of room required
  • Droplet Isolation Precautions Sign
  • Airborne
    A Hot Pink Airborne Isolation sign will be on the room door.
    Negative Pressure Room (318, 319, 426, 566, 567, 718, 719, MSICU - 4 rms)
    N95 Mask for staff
    Surgical mask for patient if transport out of room required
    Duckbill masks for visitors
  • Airborne Isolation Precautions Sign
  • Prevent Spread—What You Can Do
    Fact:Patient-to-patient spread of germs can be prevented.
    Actions:
    • Use standard precautions
    • Minimize contact with infection-causing body fluids
    • Use approved airborne/droplet/contact isolation precautions
    • When in doubt, call infection control
  • Prevent Spread—What You Can Do
    Infection Control has found that patients from Long Term Acute Care (LTAC) facilities usually have a MDRO, either now or in the past
    Nursing staff will place them in Contact Isolation immediately upon arrival, no questions asked!
    Call Infection Control if you have any questions
  • Prevent Spread—What You Can Do
    Fact:People spread germs from patient to patient.
    Actions:
    • Stay home when you are sick
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue
    • Keep your hands clean
    • Set an example!
  • The Infection Control Team
    Doramarie Arocha
    David Townson
    Gwen Way