1. literacy in art craft and design pdst 2013

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  • 1.       2013     Literacy  in  Art,  Craft  and  Design  
  • 2.  ©   Page  2       The  PDST  is  funded  by  the  Department  of  Education  and  Skills  under  the  National   Development  Plan  2007  -­‐  2013       Cultural  and  Environmental  Education   Professional  Development  Service  for  Teachers  (PDST)   Dublin  West  Education  Centre,     Old  Blessington  Road,     Tallaght,  Dublin  24.     National  Co-­‐ordinator   Conor  Harrison   Mobile:  087  240  5710   E-­‐mail:  conorharrison@pdst.ie     Administrator   Angie  Grogan   Tel:    01-­‐  4528018   E-­‐mail:  angiegrogan@pdst.ie.    
  • 3.  ©   Page  3     Acknowledgements     PDST  National  Co-­‐ordinator,  Cultural  &  Enviromental  Eduction:       Conor  Harrison     PDST  Associates  for  Art:   Maria  Moore,  Galway  Community  College,  Moinin  na  gCiseach,  Galway   Margaret  O’Shea,  Loreto  Secondary  School,  Coleville  Road,  Clonmel,  Co.  Tipperary     PDST  Art  Local  Facilitator  Team:   Aine  Andrews,    Coláiste  Choilm,  Ballincollig,  Co  Cork.   Jane  Campbell,  St.  Joseph's  Secondary  School,  Railway  Street,  Navan,  Co  Meath   Sheena  McKeon,  Coláiste  Pobail  Osraí,  Ormond  Road,  Kilkenny   Niamh  O’Neill,    Coláiste  Choilm,  Ballincollig,  Co  Cork.   Joe  Caslin,  Tullamore  College,  Tullamore,  Co  Offaly   Tony  Morrissey,  Davis  College,  Summerhill,  Mallow,  Co  Cork   Niamh  O’Donoghue,  Loreto  Secondary  School,  Balbriggan,  Co.  Dublin     Monica  White,  Mountrath  Community  School,  Dysartbeigh,  Mountrath,  Co  Laois   Keith  O’Rahilly,  Desonond  College,  Gortboy,  Newcastle  West,  County  Limerick.   Siobhan  Campbell,  Retired  from  John  Scottus  Secondary  School,  Morehampton  Rd.  Dublin  4.                   With  special  thanks  to  Maria  Moore,  Margaret  O’Shea,  Keith  O’Rahilly  and  Monica  White  who   compiled  and  designed  this  document.     Edited  by  Maria  Moore  and  Margaret  O’Shea.    
  • 4.  ©   Page  4     Contents   Foreword               Looking  and  Responding         6   Looking  and  Responding         7   Questioning             8   Learning  Windows           10     Active  Teaching  Methodologies       12   A  Gallery  Visit             14   Four  Corners  Debate           17      The  Basics  of  Romanticism         20   Online  Interview           24   Bring  Art  to  Life           27   Back  to  Back             33   Guest  Speaker             35   Skimming  and  Scanning         38   Art  History  Timeline                           40             Art  Workstation           44   Pass  the  Buck             54   Crossword             56   Distillation/Conversion           59     Annotating  Drawings           62   Mind  Mapping             65   Writing  a  Story  based  on  Art         68   Art  Language  Explored           75   Word  Search             80                 Additional  Literacy  Information  and  Activities     83   Smog  Readability  Test           84     Before,  During  and  After  Reading  Approaches     85   Writing  Frames             86     Art  Criticism             87   Word  Meaning  Checklist         88   Predicting  Meaning           90   Matching  Keyword  to  Definitions       91   Annotating  Images           92   123  Strategy             93   SQ3R               94   Graphic  Organisers           94   Visual  Verbal  Squares           97   Cloze  Test             98   Warm  Up  Activity  Ideas         99   Useful  Websites           100    
  • 5.  ©   Page  5     Foreword   Welcome  to  our  booklet  which  focuses  on  the  use  of  literacy  in  the  Art  room.       We  are  all  aware  of  the  importance  of  literacy  and  numeracy  in  education.  There  is  plenty  of   evidence  to  show  that  educational  attainment  is  adversely  affected  when  fundamental  skills   are  not  acquired.  It  makes  good  sense  to  take  a  cross  curricular  approach  to  literacy  and   numeracy,  rather  than  making  it  a  subject  specific  one.  By  integrating,  acknowledging  and   reinforcing  skills  in  literacy  and  numeracy  we  can  help  our  learners  apply  these  skills  in   everyday  life.   As  Art  teachers  this  does  not  mean  employing  new  or  radically  different  methods.  The  good   news  is  that  we  have  been  embedding  and  reinforcing  literacy  and  numeracy  skills  in  our   classes  for  years.  The  difference  is  that  we  must  now  recognise,  acknowledge  and  plan  for   the  myriad  of  ways  in  which  we  facilitate  those  language  and  numeracy  skills.   This  resource  was  developed  by  Art  teachers  for  Art  teachers.It  focuses  specifically  on   Literacy  and  demonstrates  a  variety  of  literacy  methodologies  which  can  be  adapted  by  you   for  use  with  your  learners.  We  have  included  a  variety  of  exemplar  materials  which  can  be   photocopied  for  use  in  the  classroom.     We  have  focused  on  the  four  strands  in  literacy-­‐speaking,  listening,  reading  and  writing.   Activities  are  provided  in  each  area  but  you  will  find  that  these  skills  often  overlap  and  some   activities  integrate  one  or  more  areas.  There  are  suggestions  provided  for  varying  the   activities  as  well  as  supporting  materials  which  we  hope  you  will  find  useful.  This  booklet  is   designed  to  enable  us  to  develop  some  new  strategies  as  well  as  reminding  us  of  the   techniques  we  already  employ  on  a  day  to  day  basis.     We  are  greatly  indebted  to  the  Art  PDST  team  of  Local  Facilitators  and  their  learners,both   past  and  present,  who  have  generously  contributed  materials  for  this  booklet.       Maria  Moore     Margaret  O’Shea   PDST  Associates  for  Art     Conor  Harrison   National  Co-­‐ordinator,   Cultural  &  Enviromental  Eduction     February  2013  
  • 6.  ©   Page  6                         Looking  and  Responding                                                          
  • 7.  ©   Page  7     Looking  and  Responding       Rationale  for  looking  and  responding  in  the  art   classroom     Why  is  it  important  for  our  students  to  look  and   respond  to  their  own  work  and  the  work  of   others?  What  effect  does  it  have  on  students’   learning?  How  does  it  affect  their  completed   work  and  how  does  it  affect  their  performance?     Why  do  we  want  our  students  to  look  and   respond?     • To  use  terminology   • To  understand   • To  develop  confidence   • To  understand  process   • To  develop  a  sense  of  wonder   • To  enjoy  the  experience         If  we  facilitate  looking  and  responding  in  the  art  class,  what  will  the  OUTCOMES  be?     Observations  &  Evaluative  Judgments  Improve     ▼   Forms  a  Better  Understanding     ▼   Forms  Better  &  More  Informed  Decisions     ▼ Better  Experience  &  Better  Work       How  do  we  go  about  getting  our  learners  to  look  and  respond?     One  of  the  most  useful  ways  of  encouraging  learners  to  look  at  and  respond  to  their  own   work  and  important  work  by  artists  and  designers  is  to  encourage  them  to  ask  and  answer   questions.  
  • 8.  ©   Page  8       Questioning     The  role  of  questioning  in  the  art  classroom     • Can  check  prior  knowledge     • Can  provide  variety  of  focus   • Can  be  targeted  to  gain  attention   • Can  check  that  a  lesson  has  been  absorbed   • Can  cause  learners  to  think  in  a  critical  fashion         Targeted  questions       The  reality  in  the  majority  of  Art  rooms  is  that  we  teach  to  mixed  ability  groups.  It  is  obvious   that  we  cannot  ask  every  learner  every  question,  so  targeted  questioning  is  a  very  useful   technique.  Targeted  questioning  is  where  you  ask  a  named  learner  a  question  which  is   commensurate  with  their  ability.   • It  helps  build  a  sense  of  trust  and  fosters  confidence.   • Learners  will  be  more  willing  to  participate  and  learning  increases.     • When  learners  make  mistakes  it  is  important  to  correct  the  mistake  in  a  sensitive   manner,  at  the  same  time  acknowledging  their  contribution.       Wait  time       Research  has  proven  the  importance  of  allowing  learners  ‘wait  time’  to   answer  questions.  Allow  3-­‐5  seconds  of  wait  time  for  a  lower  order  question   and  5-­‐8  seconds  for  higher  order,  when  a  learner  answers  give  a  further  2-­‐3   seconds  before  you  respond.  This  gives  learners  time  to  think  further  about   the  opinion  given  and  may  elicit  further  responses.       Using  Lower  &  Higher  Order  Questioning  in  the  Classroom     We  use  lower  order  questions  to  give  learners  the  opportunity  to  demonstrate  basic   knowledge  &  understanding.  Characteristics  of  lower  order  questions:     • The  answers  are  closed;  there  are  often  a  single  or  limited  number  of  answers.  
  • 9.  ©   Page  9     • Who,  when,  why,  how,  where?   • Describing  in  one’s  own  words.   • Remembering  (dates,  details,  etc.)   • Recognising  (styles,  artists,  art  works)         Higher  order  questions  require  learners  to  give  answers  which  require  synthesis,  analysis   and  evaluation.  Characteristics  of  higher  order  questions:     • Compare  &  Contrast   • Demonstrate  how  something  is  made  &  constructed   • Identify  motives  behind  the  work   • Create  a  new  product  based  on  similar  or  contrasting  themes  &  materials  etc.                                                              
  • 10.  ©   Page  10     Learning  Windows     LOOKING  &  RESPONDING  -­‐  ALTERNATIVE  APPROACHES       There   are   many   ways   of   approaching   the   principle   of   looking   and  responding.  One  of  the  better  ways  to  undertake  this  is  to   find  interesting  entry  points  into  a  piece  of  work.                   The  Aesthetic  Window     The  entry  point  through  which,  learners  respond  to  formal  and   sensory  qualities  of  a  subject  or  work  of  art.     Possible  Methods   • Examine  Colour   • Explore  Line   • Identify  Composition   • Look  at  Balance   • Recognise  Pattern         The  Narrative  Window       The   entry   point   through   which,   learners   respond   to   the   narrative  or  story  elements  in  a  work  of  art.     Possible  Methods   • Write  a  Story   • Create  a  Poem   • Script  a  Play   • Compose  a  Story          
  • 11.  ©   Page  11       The  Logical/Quantitative  Window     The  entry  point  through  which,  learners  respond  to  aspects   of   a   subject   or   work   that   invites   deduction   or   numerical   reasoning.     Possible  methods   • Measure   • List   • Sort  or  Group   • Compare  &  Contrast           The  Experiential  Window       The  entry  point  through  which,  learners  respond  to  a  subject   or  work  of  art  by  actually  doing  something  with  their  hands  or   bodies.     Possible  Methods   • Doing,  Role  Playing  or  Performing   • Peer  Teaching  &  Group  work   • Reconstruct  a  Work  of  Art   • Visit  a  Gallery         The  Foundational  Window     The  entry  point  through  which,  learners  respond  to  the  broader   concepts  of  philosophical  issues  raised  by  a  subject  or  work  of   art.     Possible  Methods   • Reflect  &  Consider   • Question  &  Evaluate   • Criticize  &  Judge   • Reason  &  Justify        
  • 12.  ©   Page  12                                   Active  Teaching  Methodologies                                                        
  • 13.  ©   Page  13     A  Gallery  Visit     Looking  at  Art,  Craft  and  Design     Robert Ballagh ‘Three People with Jackson Pollock' (1973)   How?   1. Introduce  the  students  to  an  exhibition.   2. Divide  the  class  into  groups  of  four  and  assign  artwork  from   the  exhibition  to  be  investigated.   3. Using  a  worksheet  students  research  the  artwork  and  plan  a   presentation.   4. Time   is   then   allocated   for   group   work   to   merge   students’   key  concepts.   5. Feedback  is  given  to  the  class  on  a  group  by  group  basis.   6. Time  is  allocated  to  each  speaker  to  answer  questions.   7. Presentations  are  given,  in  turn,  by  each  group  during  the  following  class.     Applications   • Use  to  encourage  active  and  meaningful  engagement  with  exhibitions.   • Can  be  adapted  to  looking  at  resolved  classroom  artwork.   • Use  to  introduce  students  to  a  local  art  gallery  or  heritage  centre.   • Can  be  a  starting  point  for  a  written  art  history  assignment.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   ****   ***   ***   ****   ****   ****   ****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *   ****   ****   *****   **   ****   ***   *****   ***   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     No  
  • 14.  ©   Page  14     Why  Do  it?   • This  methodology  will  develop  skills  in  observation,  reading  and  writing,  researching   and  speaking.   • Students   will   learn   to   be   selective   about   gathering   relevant   information   for   a   presentation.   • It  will  generate  discussion  and  reflection  on  the  exhibition  content.   • Critical   thinking   will   be   used   by   students   when   justifying   their   selections   and   opinions  about  the  work  to  the  larger  group.   • They  will  gain  an  appreciation  for  artists’  mediums  by  studying  artwork  in  situ.   • It   gives   learners   the   opportunity   to   engage   with   artwork   and   articulate   their   reactions  and  opinions  openly.   • This  is  a  methodology  for  fostering  team  building  skills.     Variations   • This  methodology  can  be  applied  to  artwork  on  display  in  a  classroom  context.   • Students  can  work  individually  or  in  pairs,  for  smaller  class  sizes.   • It  can  be  adapted  to  suit  group  shows  and  museum  exhibitions.   • This  work  could  lead  to  a  PowerPoint  presentation  being  compiled  by  each  student   group  within  the  class.     Additional  Resources   • Hand-­‐out  for  Leaving  Cert  Students  Visiting  a  Gallery  can  be  found  at   http://www.nationalgallery.ie/Learning/Schools/Teachers/Leaving_Cert_Resources/ ~/media/Files/Education/Schools/Senior%20Cycle/NGI%20Exhibition%20Question% 20Handout%20pdf.ashx   • A  Guide  to  visiting  a  Gallery  can  be  found  on  Wikihow   http://www.wikihow.com/Visit-­‐an-­‐Art-­‐Gallery   • A  Guide  to  looking  at  artwork  can  be  found  on:   http://www.artjunction.org/archives/question_list.pdf       Appendix   • The  worksheet  used  named  ‘Looking  at  Art  Craft  and  Design’.      
  • 15.  ©   Page  15      Work  Sheet:  Looking  at  Art,  Craft  and  Design   Name  of  Student:   Year:   Date:     6  W’s   Who   Name  the  Artist  and  tell  me  something  interesting  about  them?     What   Describe  what  you  see?     When   Was  the  work  made  in  the  past  or  present,  what  is  your  proof?     With   What  materials  were  used  to  create  the  piece  of  Art?     Why   Why  did  the  Artist  make  the  piece,  what  was  the  idea  behind  it?     Wonder   What  do  you  think  about  the  work?,  do  you  like  it?       Is  the  art?  (circle  the  medium  that  best  describes  the  work)   Fine  Art       Textiles       Photography   Design       Jewellery       Film/Video   Craft       Glass       Installation   Graphic  design     Wood  work     Architecture   Painting       Sculpture       Street  Art   Ceramics       Stone  carving     Combination/Something  else?  
  • 16.  ©   Page  16      Art  Vocabulary   Circle  6  keywords/  phrases  from  the  boxes  below  that  you  would  use  as  starting  points  to  describe   the  piece  of  Art  that  you  have  chosen;   Two  of  your  selections  must  be  from  the  box  on  right  hand  side.       Thumbnail  sketch   Photograph  here                                                               Shape     Telling  a  story   subject       How  it  makes  you  feel?   Form     Composition         Link  to  something  you  have  seen  before?   Line     Negative  space         What  does  it  mean?   Texture     Colour           Why  did  the  Artist  do  it  that  way?   Tone     Warm/cold  colours       Would  you  make  changes?   Movement   Figurative         Is  it  well  made?   Mark  making   Style           How  does  it  compare  to  similar  work?  
  • 17.  ©   Page  17     Four  Corners  Debate   Debate   premise:   ‘William   Turner’s   paintings   should   not   be   grouped  with  those  of  John  Constable  and  Casper  David  Friedrich   in  the  Romanticism  movement’.   Title:  Snow  Storm-­‐Steam  Boat  off  a  Harbour’s  Mouth  1842     How?   1. Begin   by   briefly   revising   the   work   of   Turner,   Constable   and   Friedrich  using  a  slide  show  of  one  painting  from  each.       2. Place   four   large   sheets   in   the   four   corners   of   the   room   with:   I   Agree,  I  kind  of  Agree,  I  Disagree,  I  kind  of  Disagree.   3. Select  a  controversial  premise  (see  above)  for  the  purpose  of  the   debate.   4. Students  move  to  the  corner  that  best  matches  their  opinion  and  discuss  and  formulate  their   opinions   for   5   minutes.   Notes,   text   books   and   Mind-­‐Maps   are   permitted   to   support   the   development  of  their  argument.   5. A   spokesperson   from   the   first   group   gives   feedback   to   the   class   on   their   opinion   for   30   seconds.   6. Students   are   permitted   to   change   their   groups   having   been   persuaded   by   what   was   said   before,  moving  on  to  the  next  group  for  feedback.   7. This  is  repeated  until  all  four  groups  have  given  feedback  once.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   ****   *   **   ****   ***     **   *****   Skills  Used     Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *   *****   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   *   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     Setup  a  seating   area  in  each  corner   of  the  room.   No  
  • 18.  ©   Page  18     8. Now   that   groups   are   finalised,   10   minutes   is   spent   on   establishing   and   developing   their   arguments.  Arguments  should  be  balanced,  clear  and  have  logical  conclusions.   9. Each   group   should   draft   one   concise   paragraph   of   writing   expressing   their   rationale   for   choosing  their  opinion.   10. To  conclude,  each  group’s  spokesperson  provides  feedback  on  the  final  argument.     Applications   • The  development  of  students’  fluency  with  the  material  through  discussion.   • To  encourage  deeper  engagement  with  the  reading  material.   • To  help  students  to  assimilate  information.   • A  method  of  developing  comprehension.     Why  Do  it?   • To   challenge   students   to   engage   with   the   material   by   forming   opinions   and   supporting  them  through  discussion  thereby  developing  critical  thinking.     • By  sharing  information  with  the  class  and  listening  to  other  perspectives,  deeper   learning  is  achieved  by  the  participating  students.   • Students  develop  skills  in  negotiation  and  teamwork.   • By   engaging   orally   and   through   listening,   students   gain   confidence   in   their   understanding  of  the  learning  materials.     Variations   • Students  can  be  involved  in  setting  the  debate  question.   • This   methodology   can   be   shortened   by   limiting   it   to   ‘for   and   against’   a   particular   argument.   • This  can  be  used  as  a  starting  point  for  setting  an  essay  assignment.   • This  can  be  used  at  the  end  of  a  chapter  of  Art  History  as  a  revision  exercise.     Additional  Resources   • Resources  on  debate  in  the  classroom  can  be  found  on  the  following  webpage   sponsored  by  The  Saskatchewan  Elocution  and  Debate  Association  (SEDA).   http://www.saskdebate.com/media/2875/2007gamesandactivitiesguide.pdf      
  • 19.  ©   Page  19         Appendix   • Attached  are  examples  of  the  written  work  from  this  lesson  conducted  with  a  1st   year  group.   • Text  and  supporting  material  for  drafting  of  arguments.     Appendix   1st  Year  Students’  work  from  3  Groups:  I  Agree,  I  kind  of  Disagree  and  I  Disagree.                
  • 20.  ©   Page  20     The  Basics  of  Romantic  Art   Time  Period:  1800-­‐1860   Romanticism  (or  the  Romantic  era/Period)  was  an  artistic,  literary,  and  intellectual  movement  that   originated  in  Europe  toward  the  end  of  the  18th  century  and  in  most  areas  was  at  its  peak  from   approx.   1800   to   1840.   The   Industrial   Revolution   emerged   in   the   latter   part   of   the   18th  century,   starting   in   England   and   spreading   to   France   and   America.   This   revolution   brought   with   it   a   new   market  economy,  based  on  new  technology—machine  tools  and  machine  power  instead  of  human   tools  and  animal  power.   Romantic  artists  hoped  to  inspire  an  emotional  response  in  those  who  viewed  their  art;  but  instead   of  seeking  to  inspire  faith  as  their  predecessors  had,  most  sought  to  evoke  a  nostalgic  yearning  for   rural,  pastoral  life,  the  stirrings  of  life’s  mysteries  and  a  sense  of  the  power  and  grandeur  of  nature.   Art  of  this  period  also  depicted  the  romantic  ideal  of  nationalism,  but  for  reasons  of  length,  we  will   focus  on  landscapes  in  this  passage.   Romanticism  first  showed  itself  in  landscape  painting  and  from  as  early  as  the  1760s  British  artists   began  to  turn  to  wilder  landscapes,  storms  and  Gothic  architecture,  even  if  they  had  to  make  do   with  Wales  as  a  setting.  Caspar  David  Friedrich  and  J.  M.  W.  Turner  were  born  less  than  a  year  apart   in   1774   and   1775   respectively.   They   were   to   take   German   and   English   landscape   painting   to   the   extremes  of  Romanticism.   Turner  was  fascinated  by  the  mood  of  nature  and  her  ever  changing  effects.    He  continually  sketched   the  clouds,  the  sky  and  his  natural  surroundings.  Turner  was  particularly  fascinated  with  the  power   of   the   ocean.   It   is   said   that   he   had   once   asked   to   be   lashed   to   the   mast   of   a   ship   in   order   to  “experience  the  drama”  of  a  mighty  storm  at  sea.  Romantics  believed  that  God’s  presence  was   embodied   in   nature   and   that   nature   was   evidence   of   His   existence.   Turner   saw   light   as   a   divine   emanation  and  played  with  it  in  pictures  to  evoke  that  truth.                     Fishermen  at  Sea  by  JMW   Turner,  1794  
  • 21.  ©   Page  21     Wanderer  above  the  Sea  of  Fog,  by  Caspar  David  Friedrich,  1818.     German  artist  Caspar  David  Friedrich  was  a  quintessential  Romantic  artist;  this  is  a  quintessential   Romantic  painting.  It  conveys  both  the  infinite  potential  and  possibilities  of  man  and  the  awesome,   mysterious  grandeur  of  nature.  The  popular  Romantic  theme  of  the  greatness  of  man  contrasted   with  the  sublimation  and  power  of  nature  is  shown  here.  The  man  has  climbed  high  and  conquered   much,  only  to  see  that  there  are  infinite  vistas  still  out  there,  shrouded  in  a  fog  that  hides  what  lies   beyond.     Abbey  in  an  Oak  Forest,  by  Caspar  David  Friedrich,  1810.  Another  captivating  painting  by  Friedrich   depicting  the  ruins  of  an  abbey  church  which  has  become  a  graveyard.  It  captures  several  different   Romantic   elements   at   once.   As   in   Turner’s   abbey   piece,   nature   has   reclaimed   man’s   handiwork.   Friedrich  loved  to  paint  scenes  in  wintertime;  the  stark  leafless  trees  and  grey  pall  evoke  that  sense   of  melancholy,  yearning,  and  mystery  that  Romantics  so  prized.                 Wanderer  above  the  Sea  of  Fog,  by  Caspar   David  Friedrich  1818  
  • 22.  ©   Page  22       The  Haywain  by  John  Constable   Romanticism   also   had   to   do   with   a   renewed   look   at   nature   and   mankind’s   relationship   with   it,   making   landscape   paintings   in   particular   much   more   important   and   popular   as   a   result.  The   Haywain  by  John  Constable,  shown  above,  is  a  great  example  of  that.     Other   Romantic   painters   used   emotion   in   their   work   to   rally   political   awareness,   like   Eugene   Delecroix  did  in  his  painting  entitled  Liberty  Leading  the  People.                       Eugene  Delecroix    Liberty  Leading  the  People.   It   was   a   fairly   gruesome   painting   for   that   time,   and   although   based   on   the   French   Revolution   of   1830,  it  was  obviously  highly  “romanticised”  by  Delacroix  with  bodies  piled  high  and  a  symbolically   bare-­‐breasted  woman  (denoting  liberty,  or  freedom)  carrying  the  national  flag  through  the  burning   city.    
  • 23.  ©   Page  23         Steamer  in  a  Snowstorm   Joseph   Turner   was   a   man   whose   later   landscapes   and   seascapes   are   often   seen   as   a   precursor   to  Impressionism  in  the  later  19th  century.  You  can  barely  make  out  the  steamboat  in  Steamer  in  a   Snowstorm  (or  even  what  the  scene  is  at  first)  but  once  you  know,  the  amazing  power  and  fury  of  a   winter  storm  at  sea  can  clearly  be  felt  throughout  this  painting.  Turner’s  painting  is  probably  one  of   the  best  examples  of  Romanticism,  clearly  showing  a  deliberate  move  away  from  the  perfection  of   classicism,  towards  modernism.              
  • 24.  ©   Page  24     On-­‐line  Interview   Interview  with  an  Artist  via   How?   1. Students  will  have  prior  knowledge  of  topic  related  to  the   artist   they   will   interview   in   order   to   generate   interview   questions.  For  example  if  they  are  to  interview  a  sculptor   they  will  perhaps  have  had  an  introduction  to  public  art,   an   interview   with   a   fashion   designer   preceded   by   a   workshop  in  fashion  design.   2. Students   will   work   as   a   group   to   generate   as   many   questions  as  they  can.  This  can  be  undertaken  as  a  group   exercise  or  individually.     3. The  questions  have  to  be  sorted/ranked  by  the  students   (in  collaboration  with  the  teacher).  The  teacher  can  then   plan  a  structured  approach  to  prior  learning  around  the   topic  before  the  interview  takes  place.   4. Test   the   technology   beforehand.   Send   the   list   of   questions   to   the   interviewee   to   ensure   a   more   targeted   response.   If   the   group   is   large   consider   using   a   data   projector  rather  than  a  P.C.   5. Students  will  have  predetermined  who  asks  which  particular  question  and  will  have   appointed  a  chairperson  to  record  answers.   6. To   conclude,   the   interviewee   will   have   the   opportunity   to   pose   questions   to   the   students.           Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   **   *   ****   ****   ***   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   **   ****   **   ***   ***   *   **   *****   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     No  
  • 25.  ©   Page  25     Applications   • An   insightful   way   of   comprehending   a   practitioner’s   view   of   the   world   of   Art   &   Design.   • To  encourage  consideration  of  the  artist’s  role  in  society.   • To  develop  familiarity  with  various  forms  of  information  gathering.     Why  Do  it?   • It  provides  a  student  centred  staring  point.  It  increases  the  student’s  interest  in  the   topic  and  raises  their  level  of  motivation.     • It’s  immediate.  Students  get  instant  feedback.  It  is  a  new  way  to  uncover  information   and  it  brings  the  real  world  into  the  classroom,  making  art  relevant.  Everyone  has   access  to  the  information,  irrespective  of  ability.   • Students  are  more  receptive  to  information  from  questions  they  themselves  have   asked.   It   encourages   students   to   ask   for   specific   information.   As   they   have   determined   the   information   sought   they   have   experienced   managing   their   own   learning.   • It  helps  to  create  an  environment  conducive  to  learning.     Variations   • Students  can  be  involved  in  setting  the  questions.   • They  can  search  for  a  local  artist  and  invite  them  to  be  interviewed.   • Students   can   assume   the   guise   of   an   artist   (historical)   and   be   interviewed   by   the   class  on  screen.     Additional  Resources   • www.skype.com  (for  details  on  how  to  set  up  Skype)   • http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/752  (interviewing  artists  in  the  classroom)     Appendix   • Attached   are   samples   of   questions   generated   by   a   second   year   group   interviewing  a  stone  mason.    
  • 26.  ©   Page  26     Questions  for  Skype  interview       • How  do  you  engrave  letters  on  stone?   • How  do  you  print  letters  on  glass?   • How  long  does  it  take?   • How  long  will  the  lettering  on  the  stone  last?   • What  gave  you  the  idea  to  do  lettering?   • What  age  were  you  when  you  started?   • How  did  you  paint  the  blue  writing  in  the  carved  letters?   • Where  was  the  first  place  you  did  this?   • How  could  we  improve  our  lettering?   • How  useful  is  lettering  to  business?   • What  is  the  easiest  material  to  carve  into?   • What  machines  do  you  use  for  lettering?   • Have  you  ever  done  lettering  on  anything  other  than  stone?   • Have  you  ever  done  lettering  on  a  grave  for  anyone  famous?   • Have  you  ever  made  a  mistake  in  lettering?   • How  do  you  erase  a  letter  if  you  get  it  wrong?   • What  inspired  you  to  do  this  type  (ransom)  lettering?   • Why  did  you  decide  to  do  lettering  as  a  career?                
  • 27.  ©   Page  27     Bringing  Art  to  Life     Re-­‐enacting  works  of  art       http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/michelangelo-­‐merisi-­‐da-­‐caravaggio-­‐the-­‐supper-­‐at-­‐emmaus   Caravaggio  ‘Supper  at  Emmaus’  (1601)   How?   1. Introduce  three  artists  and  their  work  using  a  Power  Point   presentation  to  students.   2. Divide   the   class   into   three   drama   groups   and   assign   a   painting  to  each.   3. Groups  begin  by  looking  at  their  painting,  consider  casting   roles   and   staging   of   the   scene.   In   particular   students   should  look  carefully  at  clothing,  pose  and  facial  expressions.   4. Using  a  worksheet  students  write  a  script  for  a  short  drama  lasting  3  minutes.   5. Students  plan  improvised  props,  costumes  and  stage  movements.   6. Groups  rehearse  drama  of  paintings  and  video  record  them.   7. Films  are  edited  adding  titles  and  credits.   8. Films  may  be  screened.         Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   ***   *****   ****   ****   *****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *   *****   *****   ****   *   *   ***   ****   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes   Students  will  use   the  room  freely  to     develop  drama.   No  
  • 28.  ©   Page  28     Applications   • This  methodology  can  be  applied  to  both  painting  and  sculpture.   • Art  work  can  be  used  as  a  starting  point  for  a  full  length  drama  lasting  5  minutes.   • It   can   be   used   to   consolidate   learning   about   a   particular   period   in   Art   History   or   Artistic  movement.   • It  can  be  carried  out  with  any  junior  or  senior  cycle  class.     Why  Do  it?   • By   looking   at   the   story   behind   the   paintings   students   will   gain   a   thorough   understanding  of  the  artwork.   • Students   will   develop   literacy   skills   in   writing   and   speaking   by   drafting   and   performing  scripts.   • Imagining  the  dialogue  or  story  preceding  the  painting  is  a  good  way  of  remembering   the  painting  and  its  historical  context.   • This  type  of  active  learning  recognises  all  abilities  and  styles  of  learning  and  is  easily   differentiated.   • Students  are  encouraged  to  critically  reflect  on  the  paintings  and  interpret  them.  By   students   having   autonomy   over   the   learning   process   greater   motivation   and   engagement  is  achieved.   • Independent   thinking   and   learning   is   encouraged   through   the   use   of   this   methodology  as  students  are  tasked  with  devising  original  scripts  and  dramas.   • Students   will   learn   to   plan   dialogue   and   dramatic   movements   suited   to   a   specific   theme.     Variations   • This  methodology  can  be  adapted  to  a  photographic  project  presenting  the  work  in   comic  strip  format.   • Certain  paintings  can  be  selected  for  dramatizing  where  all  students  in  the  class  are   involved  in  the  same  drama.   • Student  roles  can  be  divided  into:  Story-­‐board,  scripting,  actors,  filming  and  editors   making  one  resolved  drama.     Additional  Resources   • A  YouTube  re-­‐enactment  of  ‘The  Last  Supper’:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpDG8eav2iQ  
  • 29.  ©   Page  29     Appendix   • Worksheet  for  dramatizing  a  painting.   • Background  Information  on  three  artists  given  to  TY  students.     Worksheet  for  Dramatising  a  Painting     Artist:                                                                                                                     Title:   Cast     Names  of  Characters     Names  of  Students                         Props  and  Costumes:           Scene  Description:         Script:                        
  • 30.  ©   Page  30     Background  Information  for  bringing  Art  to  life   Selected  works:   — The  Last  Supper  by  Leonardo  da  Vinci   — Oath  of  the  Horatii  by  Jacque  Louis  David   — Supper  at  Emmaus  by  Caravaggio   Leonardo  da  Vinci  -­‐1452  -­‐1519  (High  Renaissance)     ‘The  Last  Supper’   — Renaissance   -­‐   a   cultural   movement   which   began   in   Italy   and   spread   throughout   Europe.  Scholars  of  the  time  became  interested  in  how  the  world  works;  the  art  of   the   time   became   more   realistic   concentrating   on   nature,   real   settings   and   perspective.     — The   Last   Supper-­‐   The   final   meal   that   Jesus   shares   with   his   Disciples   before   he   is   crucified  on  the  cross.  Leonardo  chooses  the  moment  that  Jesus  tells  them  ‘one  of   you  will  betray  me’.   — Repeated  references  are  made  to  the  number  three  …apostles  sit  in  threes…three   windows   behind   them…the   three   points   of   Jesus’s   triangular   form…perhaps   a   reference  to  the  holy  trinity   — From  the  left-­‐  Bart,  James  and  Andrew  look  on  in  surprise.  Judas,  Peter  and  John  are   next,  Judas  carries  a  money  bag  and  has  his  arm  on  the  table,  Peter  wields  a  knife   and  points  it  away  from  Jesus  perhaps  predicting    the  aggression  that  is  to  happen  in   the  garden  of  Gethsemane.  Young  John  swoons  in  shock.  On  the  other  side  of  Jesus,  
  • 31.  ©   Page  31     Thomas   is   upset,   James   looks   stunned   with   arms   in   air   and   Philip   appears   questioning.  Final  grouping  is  Matthew  and  Jude  who  turn  to  Simon  in  discussion.     — All  diners  are  seated  on  one  side  of  the  table  to  avoid  excluding  the  viewer.  Jesus   himself  is  in  centre  of  the  vanishing  point,  all  lines,  angles  and  lighting  point  to  him.   — It  is  a  fresco  painting,  found  on  the  back  wall  of  the  Refectory  in  the  chapel  of  Santa   Maria  delle  Grazie  in  Milan.   Jacques-­‐Louis  David  1748-­‐  1825.     ‘The  Oath  of  the  Horaitii’   Neo  Classical  Art-­‐  a  movement  which  looks  to  the  ancient  art  of  Greece  and  Rome  for  its   inspiration.  The  high  ideals  of  classical  art  became  the  cornerstone  of  a  new  truth  in  art   which  looked  to  uncover  a  sense  of  moral  integrity.  It  can  be  described  as  highly  heroic,   courageous   and   serious.   Colours   were   at   times   sombre   to   imply   high   morals   and   self-­‐ sacrifice.       •  This  work  is  set  in  699BC,  a  time  when  Rome  was  at  war  with  Alba.  It  depicts  three   members   of   the   Roman   Horatii   family,   (left)   who   were   chosen   by   their   father   (centre)  to  duel  against  three  members  of  the  Curiatii  family  from  Alba.    The  women   on  the  right  are  either  sisters  of  or  are  married  to  the  men  on  either  side  of  the  duel.   The  men  show  no  emotion  while  the  women  are  overcome  with  sadness.    
  • 32.  ©   Page  32     • As   is   typical   of   David’s   work   the   figures   are   heroic   and   full   of   integrity.   Although   painted  before  the  Revolution,  the  painting  became  a  symbol  of  loyalty  to  the  French   King  and  State.   Caravaggio  1571  -­‐  1610     ‘Supper  at  Emmaus’   Baroque-­‐  a  very  varied  epoch  in  Art  history  which  usually  displays  dynamic  emotion  in  an   immediate  way.    It  can  also  show  very  high  levels  of  detail  in  the  rendering  of  cloth  or  skin.   • This  painting  shows  a  common  religious  theme  in  Art  history;  the  moment  when  the   resurrected  Jesus  reveals  himself  to  the  disciples  Luke  and  Cleophas  who  respond  in   disbelief.  Luke  wears  a  scallop  shell,  a  sign  of  a  pilgrim;  the  figures  are  life  size  and   dramatic  in  their  presence.  It  shows  the  recurring  theme  of  an  everyday  event  being   interrupted  by  a  sublime  happening.   • Achieves  a  heightened  sense  of  realism  that  attempts  to  observe  the  human  being  in   both  a  physical  and  emotional  way.  Creates  intense  drama  and  effect  with  dramatic   use  of  lighting.        
  • 33.  ©   Page  33     Back  to  Back   A  listening/speaking  methodology     Back  to  back  in  action  in  class   How?   1. Sitting  back  to  back  in  pairs,  learner  1  describes  an  image   in  detail,  while  learner  2  draws  the  image.     2. Learner   2   does   not   see   the   image   until   the   end   of   the   exercise   3. Learners  will  need  an  image,  pen/pencil  and  paper.   4. Learners  are  given  5-­‐7  minutes  to  describe  the  image  in  as   much  detail  as  possible.   5. Their   partner   listens   carefully   and   draws   what   they   describe-­‐no  peeking!     Applications   • This  method  can  be  used  to  introduce  a  new  topic.   • To  help  learners  to  describe  in  words  the  contents  of  an  image.   • To  encourage  learners  to  listen  carefully   • To  use  correct  terminology  when  describing  a  work  of  art,  craft  or  design.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   ***   **   ****   ***   *****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *   *****   **   *****   *****   *   *   *****   ***   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     Learners  sit  back  to   back,  in  pairs.      
  • 34.  ©   Page  34       Why  Do  it?   • To  challenge  students  to  engage  with  the  material  by  using  the  correct  terminology   when  describing  a  work  of  Art,  Craft  or  Design.   • It  can  be  great  way  to  generate  discussion  about  a  new  topic.   • It  could  be  a  fun  way  to  revise.   • It  is  very  quick  and  easy  to  do.   • Encourages  whole  class  participation.       Variations   • This  could  evolve  into  a  “Pictionary”  game,  with  teams  competing  to  describe  and   recognise  a  work  of  Art,  Craft  or  Design.   • Learners  could  reverse  the  process  and  write  a  description  while  looking  at  an  image.   • This   exercise   could   be   extended   by   asking   learners   to   focus   on   adding   the   colours/tones  to  the  correct  part  of  the  drawn  image.                        
  • 35.  ©   Page  35     Guest  Speaker   Learning  by  Listening       Inez  Nordell  giving  a  presentation  on  Costume  Design     How?   1. The  teacher  gives  students  background  information  they   should  take  note  of,  engage  with  and  respond  to,  using  a   template.   2. During  the  talk,  students  write  down  key  words  and  any   new  vocabulary  that  they  hear.   3. Following  the  talk  the  teacher  writes  the  key  words  on  the   board.   4. Students  are  required  to  give  their  own  definition  of  each   word.   5. Students  are  then  asked  to  look  up  the  words  in  the  dictionary  and  compare  and   correct  the  meanings.     Applications     • To  encourage  students  to  listen   • To  introduce  new  vocabulary.   • To  develop  comprehension.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   ****   **   **   **   **   **   ****   **   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   *   *   **   *****   **   *****   ****   **   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     Room  is  prepared   for  speaker  to  give   talk.   No    
  • 36.  ©   Page  36     Why  Do  it?   • Pupils   can   engage   with   the   guest   speaker   and   can   become   independent   learners   through  personal  note  taking  and  effective  questioning.     • They  can  assess  what  information  is  most  relevant.   • The  language  and  vocabulary  used  by  the  guest  speaker  can  help  pupils  gain  a  better   understanding  of  the  topic.  These  new  terms  can  be  promoted  and  used  extensively   in  future  art  classes.   • Pupils’   communication   skills   will   be   reinforced   through   active   listening   and   questioning.     Variations   • The  guest  speaker  can  be  brought  to  the  class  through  digital  means  for  example   Skype.   • A  follow  up  visit  by  the  speaker  may  be  arranged  to  provide  a  workshop.   • Students  can  watch  a  DVD  or  You  Tube  film  and  apply  this  methodology.   • Mind  Mapping  can  be  used  to  record  information  while  the  speaker  is  presenting.     Additional  Resources   • Webpage  for  Listening  Strategies:   http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-­‐lesson-­‐plans/listening-­‐and-­‐ speaking-­‐strategies.cfm   • A  link  to  using  MP3  player  to  develop  listening  skills:   http://www.britishcouncil.org/professionals-­‐podcast-­‐english-­‐listening-­‐downloads-­‐ archive.htm     Appendix   • Guest  Speaker  Visit  worksheet            
  • 37.  ©   Page  37     Guest  Speaker  Visit  Worksheet     Student  Name:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Class:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Year  Group:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Topic:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Name  of  Guest  Speaker:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Occupation:-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Background  of  Guest  Speaker:                   Key  words:                     Other  information/questions  I  would  like  to  ask  :                    
  • 38.  ©   Page  38     Skimming  and  Scanning     How?   SKIMMING  is  a  method  of  rapidly  moving  the  eyes  over  text  with   the  purpose  of  getting  only  the  main  ideas  and  a  general   overview  of  the  content.   SCANNING  rapidly  covers  a  great  deal  of  material  in  order  to   locate  a  specific  fact  or  piece  of  information.     For  example,  you  skim  the  dictionary  to  find  the  ‘T’  section  but   you  scan  for  the  meaning  of  ‘tympanum’.  You  skim  the  textbook   for  the  Renaissance  section  and  scan  to  find  a  painting  by  Raphael.     Applications   • To  reinforce  keyword  vocabulary.   • A  way  of  developing  comprehension  and  understanding  of  a  particular  topic.   • To  encourage  deeper  engagement  with  the  reading  material.       Why  Do  it?   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   **   *   **   ***   ****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   ****     **   *   ***   ****   ***   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes       No  
  • 39.  ©   Page  39     1. Help  students  become  fast,  flexible  and  independent  readers.   2. Skimming  and  Scanning  helps  students  pick  out  specific  information  quickly,  training   them  to  tailor  their  reading  rate  depending  on  their  purpose.   3. Aids students to critically evaluate their own understanding.     Variations   2. Another  strategy  that  uses  the  skills  of  skimming  and  scanning  to  help  students  read   for  meaning  is  SQ3R.     2. SQ3R  stands  for  Survey,  Question,  Read,  Review  and  Recall.     Additional  Resources   http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/topic/skimming-­‐and-­‐scanning     Appendix   Student  Guide   Skimming   When  should  I  skim?   When  I  want  a  quick  idea  of  what  the  text  is   about.     ü Skim  means  to  look  quickly  through  the   text.  Looking  at  headings,  diagrams,   pictures  or  words  in  bold.  This  will  give   you  a  quick  idea  of  what  the  text  may  be   about.   ü Skim  can  mean  to  ‘skim’  through  the  text   reading  quickly  to  get  the  gist  or  main   idea  on  the  topic.   ü Skim  can  also  be  to  read  the  first  and  last   paragraphs  to  get  the  gist  of  the  topic.     Scanning   When  should  I  scan   When  I  want  specific  information.     ü Scan  means  to  look  through  the  text   quickly  to  find  specific  information,   e.g.  keywords   ü Scan  can  also  mean  to  look   throughthe  text  to  find  the  answers   to  questions.      
  • 40.  ©   Page  40     Art  History  Timeline   Using  information  to  make  a  timeline                                    Pablo  Picasso  (1881-­‐1973)   How?   1. Show  documentary  on  Picasso  by  Alastair  Sooke,  (BBC   Modern  Masters  series).   2. Make  reference  to  the  sequential  development  of   Picasso’s  life  and  work  using  this  video.   3. Provide   students   with   a   timeline   template   (with   hyperlinks  to  vetted  websites)  and  an  explanation  of  how   to  complete  it.   4. Introduce  the  class  to  relevant  websites  that  students  can   access  during  their  development  of  a  timeline.   5. In  the  second  session,  using  an  ICT  room  with  internet  facilities,  instruct  students  to   research  and  compile  the  timeline.   6. Rewriting  and  condensing  text  into  the  students’  own  words  is  encouraged  rather   than  copying  and  pasting  exclusively.   7. Students   are   required   to   present   their   work   for   display   in   the   classroom   where   a   general  discussion  and  reflection  on  the  assignment  will  take  place.       Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   *   ***   *****   *   *   ****   ***   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   *   *   *   *   *****   ****   **   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     Carried  out  in  ICT   Room.   No   http://www.biographyonline.net/artists/pablo-­‐
  • 41.  ©   Page  41     Applications   • This  methodology  can  be  applied  to  any  Art  History  period,  movement  or  individual   artist.   • It  can  be  used  as  an  introduction  or  conclusion  to  Art  History  schemes  of  work.   • Used  to  reinforce  learning  and  develop  new  vocabulary  related  to  a  genre  of  art.   • Could  be  applied  to  each  section  of  the  Art  History  course.     Why  Do  it?   • This  methodology  promotes  independent  learning  by  students.   • Students  will  develop  good  research  techniques.   • It   is   suited   to   students   of   mixed   ability   as   the   complexity   levels   can   be   easily   differentiated.   • Students   have   autonomy   over   their   selection   of   information   leading   to   greater   motivation  in  the  subject  area.   • Sequential  thinking  is  required  to  make  a  timeline  and  students  gain  experience  in   organising  information.   • ICT  skills  are  developed  by  creating  a  timeline,  by  researching  internet  websites  and   presenting  information  on  Microsoft  Word.   • Reading  (skimming  and  scanning),  writing  and  the  summarising  of  information  are   skills  developed  by  students  using  this  methodology.     Variations   • This  method  can  be  carried  out  manually.  Use  Art  History  notes  and  pre-­‐prepared   timeline  templates.   • Students  can  work  individually  or  in  groups  to  compile  a  timeline  depending  on  its   level  of  complexity.   • Comparative  timelines  can  be  constructed  using  a  similar  method  comparing  artists   or  Art  History  movements.                  
  • 42.  ©   Page  42     Additional  Resources   • Picasso   by   Alastair   Sooke   as   part   of   the   BBC   Modern   Masters   series:   http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p007hs2n   • Instruction  on  how  to  make  a  timeline  using  Microsoft  Word:   http://www.microsoft.com/education/en-­‐us/teachers/how-­‐to/Pages/creating-­‐ timeline.aspx     Appendix   • Attached  an  example  of  a  completed  Timeline,  compiled  by  a  1st  year  student.                                                            
  • 43.  ©   Page  43                                                                               !"#$%&&'())"*&+&,"-(./& & & 1903:Thiswastimewhen blindnesswasrepresented inmostofhisworkssuch asTheBlindman'sMeal andtheportraitofCelestina paintedthisyear. January,1907:!Beginspainting "LesDemoisellesd'Avignon" 1909: Cubismfirstdevelopedbetween 1909-Itisduring1909that Cubismfirsttookshapewiththe helpofGeorgeBraque.Both theseartistsanalysedshapes andtranslatedthemintoimages. Hespendsthemonthsin Avigon.BraqueandDerain aremobilisedinthewar whichpresentstheendof cubismasamovement.He returnstoPariswithEvain October. ! ! BirthofsonPaulo.Figures inpaintingsbecomemore classicalandmonumental GuernicawaspaintedbyPicassoto expresshisoutrageoftheGerman bombingoftheBasquetownof GuernicaonApril26,1937during theSpanishCivilWar.Guernicashowsthetragedies ofwarandthesufferingitinflictsuponindividuals, particularlyinnocentcivilians. WeepingWomanisanintensely personalimageandisanemblemof thesufferingoftheSpanishnation.It capturesamoodofmoralanxiety thathauntedthosewhowitnessed theSpanishCivilWar Thistalentedartistpassed awayon8thApril,1973. 19031907/91913/19141921/192219371973 1903 PicassopaintsTragedy WrightBrothersfirstflight FordMotorCompany founded Anti-Semiticpogromsin Russia ThefilmGreatTrain Robberyisreleased June5th -Automaticwasher& dryerareintroduced.1914OutbreakoftheFirst WorldWarstartswhen GermanyinvadesFrance ! ! JamesJoycePublishes Ulysses. OnNovember5,1937,Adolf Hitlerheldasecretconference intheReichChancelleryduring whichherevealedhisplansfor theacquisitionofLebensraum, orlivingspace,fortheGerman peopleattheexpenseofother nationsinEurope. Atabout16:30onMonday,26 April1937,warplanesoftheGermanCondorLegion, commandedbyColonelWolframvonRichthofen, bombedGuernicaforabouttwohours.Germany,at thistimeledbyHitler,hadlentmaterialsupporttothe Nationalistsandwereusingthewarasanopportunity totestoutnewweaponsandtactics.Later,intense aerialbombardmentbecameacrucialpreliminarystep intheblitzkriegtactic . Thedecisionbythevast majorityoftheIrishpeople tojoinwhatwasthenthe EuropeanEconomic Community(EEC)in1973. &&&&&&&&&&&&
  • 44.  ©   Page  44     Art  Workstation   Pop  Art  Worksheet     Whaam!  1963  -­‐  Lichtenstein   How?   1. Set   up   resource   stations   in   the   classroom.   These   may   include   a   combination   of   books   (textbooks   &   reference   books),   prepared   texts,   short   video,   internet   site   addresses,   posters   etc.   It   is   important   that   there   are   a   variety   of   information   sources.     Students   can   use   all   available  resources.     2. Begin  by  introducing  and  discussing  Pop  Art.  Explain  the   learning   objectives   of   the   lesson.   Students   can   work   in   groups.  Each  group  is  supplied  with  a  Pop  Art  Worksheet.   Students  are  encouraged  to  find  the  information  for  the   Pop  Art  worksheets  within  a  time  frame.     3. Students   must   delegate   work   within   their   own   group   in   order   to   complete   the   exercise  on  time.  Therefore  students  must  assess  both  the  required  information  and   the  strengths/weaknesses  of  their  group  and  plan  accordingly.   4. Students  may  seek  the  teacher’s  assistance  however  the  focus  is  on  working  on  their   own  initiative.  The  teacher’s  role  here  is  to  support,  monitor  workstations  and  direct   focus  when  necessary.   5. Students  regroup  to  compile  the  information.   6. At  the  end  of  the  allotted  time,  learning  is  consolidated  by  the  teacher,  drawing  on   the  knowledge  and  understanding  achieved  by  the  students.     Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   **   *   ***   ****   ****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   *****   *****   ***   **   **   **   ***   ***   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes                                                      No    
  • 45.  ©   Page  45     Applications   • To  develop  a  familiarity  with  the  variety  of  information  sources  available.   • To  encourage  deeper  engagement  with  a  chosen  topic.   • To  help  students  assimilate  and  qualify  material  by  skimming  &  scanning.     Why  Do  it?   • To  encourage  independent  learning  within  the  security  of  a  group.   • To  allow  students  the  opportunity  to  experience  a  range  of  learning  approaches.   • Students   will   engage   meaningfully   with   material,   identify   key   points   of   information,  record  and  share  findings  with  their  group.     • Students  learn  to  appreciate  the  value  of  teamwork,  collaboration  and  decisive   contributions  to  the  group.   • The   physically   active   nature   element   of   this   activity   will   appeal   to   the   kinaesthetic  learner.   • Students  actively  seek  information  rather  than  receive  it  passively.     Variations   • Can  be  used  for  any  topic  in  Art  History  &  Appreciation.   • Students  can  work  in  pairs  or  individually  to  complete  the  worksheet.   • Can  be  used  to  summarise  a  movement/period  of  Art  History.   • Source  materials/resources  can  be  provided  to  the  group  if  space  is  at  a   premium.   • Students  could  set  up  the  resources  for  a  topic  for  different  groups.     Additional  Resources   • Website:  www.moma.org/collection   • National  Portrait  Gallery  website:  www.npg.org.uk  (information  and  activities).   • Website:  edu.warhol.org/ppt/Pop_Art.ppt  (PowerPoint  presentation)     Appendix   • Attached  are  a  number  of  examples  of  the  Pop  Art  Work  Sheets.    
  • 46.  ©   Page  46     Pop Art Worksheet Definition  of  Pop  Art   In  the  speech  bubble  below  write  how  you  would  describe  Pop  Art…   Include  the  following  words  in  your  definition…  late  nineteen  fifties;  nineteen  sixties;   consumer  culture;  popular  media;  cultural  icons…       Pop  Artists   Name  the  artists  involved  in  this  movement  below…   ________ _________ ________ _______ ________
  • 47.  ©   Page  47     Looking  at  Abstract  Expressionism  and  Reasons  why  this  new   style  of  art  emerged  in  both  England  and  America…   Describe  the  style  of  art  that  was  popular  before  Pop  Art  emerged…                       (Use  the  images  below  to  help  write  your  answer)  
  • 48.  ©   Page  48     Reasons   Changes  that  happened  in  society  during  this  time  and  which  influenced  many  artists   included:   o New  technologies  (Hollywood  movies,  colour  TV)   o New  popular  interests  (comic  books,  consumer  goods  such  as  coca  cola)   o History  (post  war  art)   o The  rise  of  an  affluent  society  in  both  America  and  Europe   o A    wealth  of  popular  imagery   o The  rise  of  the  celebrity…   Give  examples  of  each  word  underlined,  in  the  world  which  we  live  in  today…    
  • 49.  ©   Page  49     How  did  the  role  of  the  artist  change  with  Pop  Art?     Use  some  or  all  of  the  following  words  in  your  answer…     Celebrity  status   Film  maker   Fashion  designer   Mass  product  rather  than  an  individual  work  of  art   Humour     Use  of  everyday  objects   Commercial  brand   Myth  surrounding  the  artist   Mass  media   Embracing  consumerism   Andy  Warhol,  David  Hockney,  Henry  Geldzahler  and  friend…    
  • 50.  ©   Page  50     Join  the  terms  below  with  an  image  that  best  describes  their  meaning…   (More  than  one  term  may  be  applied  to  the  same  image)       Mass  media   Polular  media   Consumer  society   Mass  reproduction   Cultural  Icons   Soft  sculptures   Giant  sculptures   Repetition   Garish/Bold   colours   Packaging   Art  for  art’s  sake   Mass  production   Clean  lines   Flat  colours   Mass  media   Polular  media   Consumer  society   Mass  reproduction   Cultural  Icons   Soft  sculptures   Giant  sculptures   Repetition   Garish/Bold   colours   Packaging   Art  for  art’s  sake   Mass  production   Clean  lines   Flat  colours  
  • 51.  ©   Page  51     Mass  media   Polular  media   Consumer  society   Mass  reproduction   Cultural  Icons   Soft  sculptures   Giant  sculptures   Repetition   Garish/Bold   colours   Packaging   Art  for  art’s  sake   Mass  production   Clean  lines   Flat  colours  
  • 52.  ©   Page  52     Pop  Art  and  You…   Can  you  think  of  packaging  we  use  in  today’s  world  that  is  universally  popular?         Name  an  icon  living  in  today’s  world  that  Andy  Warhol  might  use  in  his  art  practice,  if  he  was  still   alive  today…               If  you  were  to  design  a  large  scale  sculpture  or  a  soft  sculpture,  similar  to  the  examples  below,  for   your  school  what  object  would  you  chose  and  why?    
  • 53.  ©   Page  53     Looking  at  and  discussing  an  image  of  Pop  Art  …..                                           Just  what  is  it  that  makes  todays’  homes  so  different,  so  appealing?   Poster  collage  designed  by  Richard  Hamilton  for  exhibition  entitled  ‘This  Is  Tomorrow’,  in  1956.   Label  this  artwork  with  the  following  words  and  describe  their  meaning…     Domestic   interior   scene;   stereotyped   couple;   comfortable   living;   glamour;   affluence;   modern   accessories;   collage;   magazine   cut-­‐outs;   mass   produced   product;   ironic   tone;   humour;   scale;   Dadaism  reference;  use  of  text;  post-­‐war  Britain;  American  influence    
  • 54.  ©   Page  54     Pass  the  Buck   Art  History  and  Appreciation  Lesson   Using  Video,  DVD‘You  Tube’  or  ‘Smart  History’  videos  to   encourage  learning  through  listening,  writing  and  speaking.     http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/Masaccio.html   How?   1. Write  a  higher  order  question  on  the  board  and  ask  the  students  to  listen  carefully  to  a  DVD,   Video,   You   Tube   or   Smart   History   video.   (In   this   example   the   smart   History   website   was   used  ,  see  link  above,  and  the  question  posed  was:     • Masaccio’s  (1401-­‐1428)  grasp  of  perspective  and  three-­‐dimensional  modeling  is   seen   in   the   “The   Tribute   Money”.   Discuss   Masaccio’s   work   with   detailed   reference  to  the  Tribute  Money,  the  period  in  which  it  was  produced,  its  subject   matter,  composition,  materials  and  the  techniques  used  in  its  production.    (Q  2  European  Section  L.C.  Higher  Level  2012)     2. Students  work  in  pairs  and  have  a  strict,  short  time  limit  (example  5  minutes)  to  draft  an   answer  to  a  difficult  question.  It's  best  if  they  work  on  large  A2  paper  with  felt  pens.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   ****   ***   ***   ****   ****   ***   ****   ****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice     *****   ***   *****   *****   *****   *****   *****   ***   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     No  
  • 55.  ©   Page  55     3. When  the  time  is  up,  ask  the  students  to  pass  their  unfinished  answer  to  the  pair  of  students   behind  them  and  receive  the  work  of  the  pair  in  front.   4. They  now  have  five  minutes  to  continue,  not  their  own  answer,  but  the  received  answer   from  the  pair  in  front,  picking  up  from  wherever  it  was  left.  They  are  encouraged  not  just  to   add,  but  to  cross  out  bits  they  don't  agree  with,  redraft  and  correct  spellings  and  grammar   mistakes.   5. When  5  minutes  are  up,  papers  are  passed  on.   6. The  newly  received  answer  is  continued  for  a  further  five  minutes.   7. And  so  on  until  the  students  have  complete  answers  or  10  minutes  before  the  end  of  class   time.   8. The  answers  are  then  returned  to  their  original  authors,  who  have  the  opportunity  to  draft   the  final  polished  version  of  the  answer.     Applications   • Use  to  encourage  students’  listening,  speaking,  writing  and  reading  skills.     • To  help  students  to  assimilate  information  by  reading  and  scanning  for  keywords.   • A  way  of  developing  comprehension  and  understanding  of  a  topic.   • Can  be  a  revision  exercise  at  the  end  of  a  scheme  of  work  or  topic.       Why  Do  it?   • This  activity  trains  students  in  crucial  exam  technique,  particularly  the  art  of  writing  precise   and  full  answers.   • It  promotes  a  more  conscious  approach  to  writing,  including  planning,  accuracy,  attention  to   time  and  speed,  awareness  of  audience.   • Even  though  the  material  might  be  heavy  and  serious,  the  activity  itself  is  light.  No  one  gets   too  bogged  down.  The  pace  and  the  passing  make  it  sparky  and  fun.       Variations   There  are  so  many  variables  in  this  activity,  for  example:   • Vary  the  time  for  each  round.  Give  four  minutes  for  the  first  round,  five  for  the  second,  six  for   the  third  and  so  on  to  allow  enough  reading  and  thinking  time  as  the  answers  become  fuller.   • Vary  the  length  and  complexity  of  the  tasks.  Differentiation  can  be  built  in.   • Vary  the  questions,  so  each  pair  starts  with  a  different  question  -­‐  this  really  keeps  people  on   their  toes.  Students  have  to  switch  their  thinking  to  a  new  subject  every  round.  This  simulates   the  pressure  of  an  exam.   • In   the   first   round   give   students   enough   time   to   write   a   complete   answer.   Then,   the   pair   behind  don't  continue  it:  they  redraft  it.   • Or,   the   pair   behind   mark   the   answer   to   set   criteria.   This   is   particularly   powerful   if   exam   criteria   are   used.   Students   will   need   to   know   beforehand   how   an   examiner   approaches   a   script.      
  • 56.  ©   Page  56     Crossword     Crossword   How?   1. Using   keywords   for   the   subject   area,   devise   clues   for   a   crossword   suited   to   your   learners.   Input   clues   and   solutions  into  puzzle  maker  of  your  choice.     2. Print  and  copy  one  per  learner.   3. There  are  many  web  sites  available.     4. This  could  be  used  for  reinforcing  key  words  in  Art  history,   craft  or  design.     Applications   • Uses  key  words  to  reinforce  learning.   • Could  be  used  for  homework  or  as  a  form  of  revision   • Taps  into  skills  learners  use  both  in  and  out  of  school.       Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   *   ***   *****   *   *   ***   ***   *   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   *   *   *   *   *****   *****   ***   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes       no  
  • 57.  ©   Page  57     Why  Do  it?   — A  quick  way  to  reinforce  learning;  can  be  used  as  a  homework  exercise  or  as  a   method  of  revising  a  topic.   — Very  popular  with  learners.   — Quick  and  easy  to  do.   — Fun     Variations   — Students  could  devise  their  own  crosswords  using  list  words.   — The  crosswords  could  be  compiled  and  used  in  an  Art  crossword  book.   — Learners  could  work  in  pairs  to  solve  the  clues.     Additional  Resources   Good  websites  include….     https://crosswordlabs.com/ http://www.crosswordpuzzlegames.com/create.html http://edhelper.com/crossword_free.htm http://www.puzzle-maker.com/CW/   Appendix   — Attached  is  a  crossword  and  answer  page  based  on  Neo-­‐Classical  Art.                
  • 58.  ©   Page  58     Neo-­‐Classical  Art     Across   1. Very  sad   5. The  _____  of  Marat     6. Jacques  Louis  _____     7. Happened  a  long  time  ago   9.          Standard  of  perfection.                  10.      Rising  up.                  12.      Home  to  Vatican.                  13.      Free  standing  object.                  14.      Paint  was  applied  this  way.                  16.      Equal.                  20.      Place,  not  flat.     Down   2. The  study  of  buildings.   3. Without  clothing.   4. Of  lines.   8. Birthplace  of  the  Renaissance.   9. Jean  Auguste  Dominque  ______                  11.    Ingre’s  bather.                  15.    ____  of  Horatii.                  17.        Offical  french  artist  club.                  18.        Very  far  in  the  past.                  19.        A  skill  prized  by  artists.    
  • 59.  ©   Page  59     Distillation/Conversion   Create  a  Curriculum  Vitae  for  an  artist                   Rembrandt  contemplating  a  job  offer…..   How?   1. This  is  an  exercise  where  students  can  work  in  pairs  or   individually.  Students  choose  an  artist  (one  whom  they   have  prior  knowledge  of)  and  have  access  to  resources   for  information  such  as  reference  books,  internet,  video,   text   books   etc.   They   are   challenged   to   find   information   relating   to   their   chosen   artist.       2. Students  are  then  given  a  Curriculum  Vitae  template.     3. From  the  information  gathered  the  students  are  then  required  to  reduce  (distil)  the   existing  information  and  complete  a  C.V  for  their  chosen  artist.   4. The  CV  can  be  typed  and  printed,  or  hand  written.  Where  possible  consider  the   historical  style/  context  of  the  period  in  which  the  artist  lived.  It  may  also  include   illustrations  if  desired.       Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   *   **   *   **   ***   ***   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   **   *   *   *   ****   *****   ***   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes       No     C.V.  
  • 60.  ©   Page  60     Applications   — Where  students  are  familiar  with  the  concept  of  writing  a  C.V  (L.C.V.P  students).  This   is  a  cross-­‐curricular  activity.   — Material  can  only  be  condensed  if  it  is  understood.  If  students  struggle  with  distilling   the  information  it  can  show  where  their  difficulties  lie.   — It  can  serve  as  a  revision  (mind  mapping)  exercise  where  students  focus  on  pockets   of  factual  important  information.  It  allows  students  to  become  selective  regarding   information  used.     Why  Do  it?   — This  method  can  assist  students  in  the  filtering  of  non-­‐essential  information  in  text.  It   gives   students   confidence   to   evaluate   and   remove   unnecessary   material   and   attribute  status  to  key  information.     — To   challenge   students   to   engage   with   the   material   critically   and   to   support   independent  research  skills.     — By  showing  students  how  information  provided  can  be  condensed  to  just  key  facts   this  contributes  towards  essential  revision  skills.     Variations   — Students  can  choose  any  artist  from  any  period  in  art  history.   — Completed  works  can  be  used  as  visual  aids  in  the  classroom.   — Can   be   used   as   a   homework   activity,   lesson   summarisation,   craft   skills   project   (calligraphy  for  example).   Additional  Resources   — http://www.wga.hu   — www.recriutireland.com  (  for  CV  templates)   Appendix   — Attached  are  examples  of  the  written  work  from  this  lesson  conducted  with  a  6th   year  group  and  a  2nd  year  group.   — The  sample  CV  template  text  given  to  students  in  preparation  for  this  lesson  and   used  as  supporting  material  for  first  draft  of  the  C.V.    
  • 61.  ©   Page  61       Insert   portrait   here  
  • 62.  ©   Page  62     Annotating  drawings   Using  annotation  to  develop  ideas   Leonardo  da  Vinci  sketchbook  page  showing  muscles  of  the  neck  and  arm   with  annotation   How?   1. Learners  make  drawings  from  observation,  as  they  do  so   they  also  make  notes  to  record/explain  what  they  plan   to  do.   2. Drawing  materials  and  primary  sources.   3. They   continue   to   draw   and   use   the   note   making   as   a   form   of   personal   shorthand   to   explain   their   thought   processes.       Applications   — A  way  of  developing  ideas  for  craft/design.   — A  method  to  record  techniques  and  remember  the  correct  process.   — An  age  old  method  of  problem  solving     Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun     Articulation   *****   ***   ***   ****   *   ***   ***   ***   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   *   *   *   *   *   *****   *****   *****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes       No  
  • 63.  ©   Page  63     Why  Do  it?   — It  encourages  learners  to  engage  and  demonstrate  their  thought  process.   — Learners   can   think   through   designs   and   ideas   in   order   to   identify   and   resolve   potential  problems.     — They  can  use  it  to  record  chronologically  the  techniques  used  in  a  given  craft.     Variations   — Learners  could  use  this  technique  to  explore  the  different  qualities  found  in  an   object/objects.   — Learners  could  illustrate  techniques  step  by  step.     — Learners  could  explore  the  expressive  qualities  of  a  variety  of  words.     Additional  Resources   Examples  of  sketchbooks  can  be  found  on   — http://www.drawingsofleonardo.org/   — http://goya.unizar.es/InfoGoya/Work/Italiano.html   — http://www.scribd.com/doc/6990304/Leonardo-­‐Da-­‐Vinci-­‐Sketch-­‐Book-­‐05         Appendix   — Attached   are   examples   of   annotated   drawings   from   a   2nd   year   group   when   developing  images  suitable  for  a  lino  print.              
  • 64.  ©   Page  64       Annotated  sketchpads        2 nd  Year  Students   Urban/Rural  Girls  Secondary   School  
  • 65.  ©   Page  65     Mind  mapping     Art  History  and  Appreciation  Lesson               How?   1. Ask  students  to  convert  a  piece  of  text  based  on  the  Romantic   Period  of  Art  History  into  a  Mind-­‐Map.   2. Firstly  the  teacher  will  read  aloud  the  text  to  the  class.   3. Students   will   work   in   pairs   sharing   a   copy   of   the   text;   one   between  two.     4. On  an  A3  sheet  of  white  paper,  using  colour,  draw  a  central   image  with  the  heading  Romanticism  representing  this  period   of  Art  History.   5. Draw   four   radiating   branches,   each   with   a   different   colour,   that  account  for  the  four  main  points  in  the  passage  of  writing.  Each  line  should  also   have  a  key  image  along  with  a  word  to  represent  these  points.   6. Additional   lines   branch   out   from   these   providing   more   detail   and   information.   All   branches  should  have  a  connected  structure  stemming  from  the  central  image  of  the   Mind-­‐Map.   7. At  the  end  of  the  lesson  evaluate  with  the  class  what  areas  they  chose  as  main  points   and  discuss  some  of  the  sub  headings  chosen  as  well  as  the  imagery  that  was  used  to  act   as  a  symbol  for  the  information.   8. To  conclude,  discuss  other  applications  for  Mind-­‐Mapping  with  the  class  as  a  tool  for   reading  and  understanding.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   ****     *   ****     **   *   **   Skills  Used     Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   ***       *   ****   ***   **   *   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes                No  
  • 66.  ©   Page  66       Applications   — To  encourage  deeper  engagement  with  reading  material.   — To  help  students  to  assimilate  information  by  reading  and  scanning.   — A  way  of  developing  comprehension  and  understanding  of  a  topic.   — It  can  be  used  as  an  effective  memory  aid  and  active  study  tool  for  taking  notes.   — Provides  opportunity  for  rapid  revision.   Why  Do  it?   — It   develops   skills   of   condensing   information   and   promotes   independent   learning   by   developing  students’  discernment  of  what  is  pertinent  and  thereby  developing  critical   thinking.     — It  caters  for  a  variety  of  learning  styles  and  offers  scope  for  lesson  differentiation.   — Active   learning   is   the   core   benefit   of   this   activity   providing   opportunity   for   deeper   learning  rather  than  learning  by  rote.   — Having   converted   linear   notes   into   a   Mind-­‐Map,   information   is   more   accessible   for       review  by  the  student  for  the  purpose  of  preparing  for  examination.   To  equip  students  with  note  taking  skills  in  all  subject  areas.     Variations   — Working  in  groups,  students  can  Mind-­‐Map  different  aspects  of  one  topic  with  a  view  to   combining  them  as  a  class  resource  for  display.   — Mind-­‐Maps  can  be  used  as  a  reference  to  answer  exam  questions  in  class.   — Presentations  can  be  given  by  students  on  a  particular  Art  History  topic  using  a  Mind-­‐ Map  as  a  focus  for  the  talk.   Additional  Resources   — Tony  Buzan  who  is  the  leading  authority  on  Mind-­‐Mapping  and  wrote  ‘Radiant  Thinking’.   — Also  see  ‘Concept-­‐Mapping’  by  Joeseph  Novak.   — For  a  full  explanation  on  Mind-­‐Mapping  and  Concept-­‐  Mapping  see:  Beyond  Monet:  The   Artful  Science  of  Instructional  Integration  by  authors  Barrie  Bennett  and  Carol  Rolheiser   (2008).   Appendix   • Attached  are  examples  of  work  from  this  lesson  conducted  with  a  first  year  group.   Appendix  
  • 67.  ©   Page  67     1 st  Year  Student  Work:  Very  Good  Standard                 1 st  Year  Student  Work:  Good/Average  Standard                 1 st  Year  Student  Work:  Fair  Standard      
  • 68.  ©   Page  68     Writing  a  story  based  on  Art   A  story  about  Goya’s  ‘The  3rd  of  May  1808’     Francisco  de  Goya’s  ‘The  3rd  of  May  1808’   How?   1. Begin  by  teaching  students  about  Goya’s  painting  ‘The  3rd  of   May  1808’  and  its  historical  context  using  a  Power  Point.   2. Working  in  pairs  for  10  minutes,  ask  students  to  brainstorm,   using   an   A4   sheet,   ideas   for   including   themselves   in   the   painting.   3. They   are   encouraged   to   imagine   what   might   have   taken   place   before   and   after   the   event  in  the  painting,  considering  its  content  and  the  social  history  of  its  time.   4. Individually,  students  will  then  spend  the  remainder  of  the  class  developing  a  narrative   that  includes  them  (the  student)  in  the  painting.   5. When   the   story   is   written,   students   type   and   print   their   story   for   display   with   the   painting  in  the  classroom.         Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   *   ****   **   **   *   ****   *   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   ****   *       *   *   *****   ****   *****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     No  
  • 69.  ©   Page  69     Applications   — This  methodology  can  be  used  to  contextualise  a  scheme  of  work  about  painting.   — It  can  be  used  as  an  introduction  to  an  artist  or  period  of  Art  during  an  Art  History   lesson.   — This  can  be  used  as  a  cross-­‐curricular  assignment  linking  Art  History  with  English.   — An   example   of   the   work   resulting   from   this   could   be   published   in   the   school   yearbook.     Why  Do  it?   — This  is  a  fun  activity  and  will  lead  to  good  participation  levels  and  motivation.   — Students  get  to  re-­‐live  this  painting  through  storytelling  and  empathise  with  people   of  the  time.   — Literacy  skills  are  being  developed  through  creative  writing  which  includes  factual   content.   — This  active-­‐learning  methodology  will  enable  the  class  to  remember  this  period  of  Art   History  vividly.     Variations   — Students  can  work  in  pairs  for  the  duration  of  this  task.   — This  methodology  can  be  applied  to  sculpture  and  prints.   — Students   can   include   a   group   member   (working   in   pairs)   in   the   narrative   adding   interest  and  depth  to  the  work.   — Pod  casts  of  these  stories  (having  been  narrated)  can  be  made  of  the  finished  work   for  presentation.     Additional  Resources   • Guidelines  on  writing  and  describing  a  painting:   http://twp.duke.edu/uploads/assets/painting.pdf   • Creative  writing  website:   http://creativewriting.ie/online-­‐writing-­‐courses/   Appendix   • Information  on  Goya’s  painting  ‘The  3rd  of  May  1808’   • Examples  of  students’  work  from  Junior  cycle  
  • 70.  ©   Page  70     Information  on  Goya’s  painting  ‘The  3rd  of  May  1808’     Francisco  de  Goya   • Date  -­‐  1746-­‐1828   • From  –  Madrid,  Spain   • Style  –  Romantic       Definition  of  Romanticism:   These  artists  strove  to  break  free  from  artistic  rules.  They  were  independent  of  the  social   order   and   chose   their   own   subjects.   Some   romantics   were   interested   in   the   beauty   of   Nature   exhibiting   its   power   and   vastness.   Others   showed   interest   in   the   simple   dignified   peasant,  shown  to  be  the  victim  of  power  and  corruption.  Above  all,  they  set  out  to  capture   the  moment  of  Drama  and  action.   Goya’s  contribution  to  Art   • He  painted  with  originality  and  freedom  in  line  and  texture.     • He  sought  after  the  truth  in  all  his  works.   • In  portraits  he  captured  the  true  unflattering  character  of  the  sitter.   • In   political   work   he   showed   the   horrors   of   war,   and   in   his   murals   the   inner   turmoil  he  suffered.     Influence  for  the  painting   Goya  was  influenced  by  the  political  climate  of  Spain  and  France,  which  included  the  French   occupation  of  Spain  and  its  subsequent  war.   Napoleon   I   of   France   crowned   himself   Emperor   in   1804.   Spain   controlled   access   to   the   Mediterranean,   and   so   the   country   was   politically   and   strategically   important   to   French   interests.  Charles  IV  was  the  reigning  Spanish  ruler,  Napoleon  took  advantage  of  the  weak   king  by  suggesting  the  two  nations  conquer  and  divide  Portugal,  with  France  and  Spain  each   taking  a  third  of  the  spoils,  and  the  final  third  going  to  the  Spanish  Prime  Minister  Manuel   de  Godoy.  However  Godoy  was  tricked,  and  accepted  the  French  offer.  He  failed  to  notice   Napoleon's  true  intentions,  and  was  unaware  that  his  new  ally  and  co-­‐sovereign,  the  former   king's   son   Ferdinand  VII   of   Spain,   was   using   the   invasion   merely   as   a   ploy   to   seize   the   Spanish  Parliament  and  throne.  Ferdinand  intended  not  only  that  Godoy  be  killed  during  the   impending  power  struggle,  but  also  that  the  lives  of  his  own  parents  be  sacrificed.    
  • 71.  ©   Page  71     History   • Under  the  guise  of  reinforcing  the  Spanish  armies,  23,000  French  troops,  entered   Spain  unopposed  in  November  1807.   • Even   when   France's   intentions   became   clear   the   following   February,   the   occupying   forces   found   little   resistance   apart   from   isolated   actions   in   disconnected  areas.   • Although  the  Spanish  people  had  accepted  foreign  monarchs  in  the  past,  they   were  deeply  resentful  of  the  new  French  rule.   • On  2  May  1808,  provoked  by  news  of  the  planned  removal  to  France  of  the  last   members  of  the  Spanish  royal  family,  the  people  of  Madrid  rebelled  in  the  Dos  de   Mayo  Uprising.   • A   proclamation   issued   that   day   to   his   troops   by   Marshall   Murat   read:   "The   population  of  Madrid,  led  astray,  has  given  itself  to  revolt  and  murder.  French   blood  has  flowed.  It  demands  vengeance.  All  those  arrested  in  the  uprising,  arms   in  hand,  will  be  shot”.                           The  3rd  of  May  1808   • This  painting  was  painted  in  1814.   • It  is  a  typical  Romantic  work  where  Goya  captures  the  dramatic  moment.  
  • 72.  ©   Page  72     • Though   the   painting   depicts   a   particular   event,   it   goes   beyond   the   death   of   individuals  to  make  a  powerful  anti-­‐war  statement.   • The  strong  line  of  light  coming  from  the  oversized  lantern  at  the  axis  of  the  painting   divides  the  soldiers  from  the  citizens,  highlighting  their  faces,  drawing  our  attention   to  them.   • On   the   right   of   the   painting,   the   regular   line   of   the   soldiers   symbolise   their   dehumanised  mechanical  form  and  action.  The  victims  are  an  irregular  group  facing   the   light,   their   human   features   and   feelings   create   a   stark   contrast   with   their   executioners.   • Colour  is  used  symbolically  and  sparingly  in  the  work.  The  soldiers  are  in  darkness,   the  victims  are  in  the  light  symbolising  evil  and  good.  The  only  definite  colours  are   the  white  shirt  and  yellow  pants  of  the  central  victim  and  the  red  blood  of  the  dead.   • In   the   background   we   see   the   city,   none   of   the   buildings   can   be   identified,   their   ghostly  silhouette  against  the  starless  sky  adds  to  the  nightmarish  atmosphere  of  the   proceedings.   • The   spectators’   eye   is   immediately   drawn   to   the   man   in   white,   whose   arms   are   raised   in   protest.   His   pose   carries   deliberate   echoes   of   the   crucifixion;   a   fitting   association  for  an  innocent  symbol  of  persecution  and  martyrdom.   • Goya  took  pains  to  depict  the  condemned  men  as  individuals,  each  with  differing   reactions  to  their  fate.  A  monk  lowers  his  head  and  clasps  his  hands  in  prayer  while   his  neighbour  stares  his  killers  in  the  face,  defiant  to  the  last.   • In   contrast   to   their   victims   the   soldiers’   expressions   are   hidden   from   the   viewer,   underlining  their  role  as  the  faceless  perpetrators  of  violence  and  oppression.                              
  • 73.  ©   Page  73     Examples  of  students’  work  from  Junior  Cycle     Goya:  The  Third  of  May  1808   By  3rd  year  Student,  Co.  Sligo   I  have  been  dragged  from  my  own  home  into  the  darkness  of  the  outside  world,  into  the  pain   and   cross-­‐fire   of   the   guns   as   the   dark   clothed   figures   pulled   more   innocents   from   the   warmth.   Panic   flooded   the   small   crowd   that   was   being   herded   like   cattle   ready   for   the   slaughter.   Women  cried  for  their  abandoned  children  that  were  left  on  the  doorstep  to  be  turned  into   soldiers  to  aid  our  captors.  We  were  dragged  down  the  cobbled  streets  and  alleyways  and   soon  the  lights  of  the  street  were  left  behind  us.  Through  the  blind  panic  of  the  capture  I   heard  the  armed  speak  in  their  native  tongue;  their  tongues  guided  by  the  grudge  of  the   rebellion.     We  were  thrown  into  a  field  beside  a  mound  of  hay  still  golden  from  last  week’s  harvest.   Fear  spread  through  us  as  we  fell  to  our  knees,  regretting  every  wrong  we  did  except  for   standing  up  for  our  independence.     A  man,  balding,  wise  and  fierce  would  not  accept  his  capture  and  tried  to  run.  A  bang  echoed   in  the  field  and  smoke  rose  from  a  barrel  of  a  gun.  He  fell  to  the  earth  with  a  heavy  thud.   Everyone  around  me  got  to  their  knees  praying  and  begging  for  mercy.  God  could  not  help  us   now  and  I  knew  it,  but  I  kept  quiet,  because  the  only  thing  that  they  had  left  was  their  faith.   A  breeze  blew  against  us  and  rippled  across  the  shirt  that  I  knew  would  be  the  only  one  if  I   survived.  Now  certain  that  our  homes  were  raided,  I  knelt  before  them  and  held  my  head  up   strongly  saying  words  that  I  knew  would  echo  in  the  minds  of  the  executioners.  ‘‘You  may   take  only  a  few  of  us,  but  the  rebellion  will  last  as  long  as  there  is  Spanish  blood  flowing   through  the  veins  of  the  innocent.  You  will  fail….’’   A  shot  rippled  through  me  and  I  went  blind,  fallen  to  the  sodden  earth.            
  • 74.  ©   Page  74     Goya:  The  Third  of  May  1808   By  3rd  Year  Student,  Co.  Sligo   One  night  I  was  sleeping  in  my  bedroom  when  a  lot  of  guys  came  in,  they  put  me  in  a  bag   and  dragged  me  out.  As  they  dragged  me  through  the  town,  I  tried  to  get  out  of  the  bag,  but   every  time  I  tried  they  would  beat  me  with  a  stick.  When  I  poked  my  head  out,  they  finally   whacked  my  head  and  knocked  me  out.     When  I  woke  up  I  was  on  the  outskirts  of  the  town  and  there  was  a  dead  body  next  to  me.  As   I  looked  around  there  was  a  lot  of  people  crying.  I  stood  up  with  my  arms  outstretched  and   said  ‘let  my  people  go!’.    The  light  was  reflecting  of  my  white  shirt,  the  people  around  me   were  wearing  dark  and  tattered  clothes.  Right  before  they  shot  me  I  …….   BANG.  They  shot  me  straight  in  the  head.  As  I  lay  there,  dead,  the  mud  took  the  shape  of  my   body.                                        
  • 75.  ©   Page  75     Art  Language  Explored   Explore  Art  Exam-­‐Paper  Questions  and  Art   Terms.                 How?   1. Through  class  discussion,  make  a  redraft  of  two  exam   questions   replacing   ordinary   words   in   the   questions   with  a  list  of  ‘art  terms’  on  the  board.   2. Make  a  distinction  between  ordinary  and  higher  level   by  attempting  to  re-­‐draft  a  question  from  each  with   the  help  of  the  class.   3. Explore   an   art   exam   question   and   discuss   techniques   for   comprehension   like   underlining  keywords  and  separating  out  tasks  being  asked  of  the  student  in  the   question.   4. Using   a   worksheet   and   in   pairs,   ask   students   to   give   their   interpretation   and   alternative  choice  for  a  list  of  art  terms  used  in  exam  papers.   5. On  a  second  worksheet,  ask  students  to  separate  an  exam  question  into  the  tasks   being  asked  by  the  question.   6. Ask  students  to  redraft  an  exam  question  in  everyday  language  by  using  the  art   terms  provided.   7. To  conclude  students  will  provide  feedback  on  a  part  of  their  worksheet  to  the   rest  of  the  class.   Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   *   ****   **   ***   *   ****   ****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *   ****   *   ***   *   **   ****   *   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes     No  
  • 76.  ©   Page  76     Applications   — This   methodology   can   be   used   as   part   of   a   program   of   revision   leading   up   to   examination  in  5th  and  6th  year.   — This  activity  could  be  a  precursor  to  developing  a  subject  specific  word  bank.   Why  Do  it?   — This  activity  encourages  students  to  problem  solve  in  pairs  developing  understanding   and  comprehension.   — It  will  provide  students  with  confidence  in  reading  and  interpreting  exam  language  in   art.   — By  redrafting  questions  and  words  it  develops  reading  and  writing  skills  through  the   use  of  critical  thinking.   — It  encourages  the  manipulation  of  information  rather  than  rote  learning.   — This  methodology  teaches  students  how  to  coherently  engage  with  exam  questions;   a  skill  transferable  to  all  exam  settings.   — This   activity   involves   active   learning   by   working   in   pairs   and   in   dealing   with   a   common   challenge   around   exam   paper   terminology;   all   leading   to   better   class   motivation.   Variations   — This   methodology   can   be   adapted   to   gain   an   understanding   of   art   terms   used   in   practical   processes   like   printmaking,   design   and   ceramics.   In   the   place   of   exam   questions,   statements   can   be   used   with   the   context   of   the   particular   discipline   in   mind.   Additional  Resources   • Art  examination  papers  can  be  downloaded  on  the  website:  http://www.examinations.ie   • Helpful  information  on  exam  papers  an  exam  strategies:   http://www.mocks.ie/LeavingCert/Subjects/Art.aspx     Appendix   • Worksheet  one:  A  list  of  art  exam  terms  to  be  interpreted  and  reworded.   • Worksheet  two:  Separate  exam  questions  into  tasks  and  redraft  an  exam  question   using  exam  terms.      
  • 77.  ©   Page  77         Worksheet  One:  A  list  of  art  exam  terms  to  be  interpreted  and  reworded       Words/phrases     Interpretation/Understanding     Alternative  words   Subject  matter       Name  a  work  that   fits  into  one  of  the   following   categories       Overall  plan   • Exterior   • interior       Composition   • medium   • use  of  colour.       General  information       Decorative  features       Innovations       Influences       Subject  matter       Discuss  in  detail       Making  reference       Theme,  periods       Composition       Style       Materials       Techiques       Illustrate  your   answer          
  • 78.  ©   Page  78     Worksheet  Two     Separate  exam  question  into  tasks  and  redraft  an  exam  question  using  exam  terms.       Separate  this  exam  question  into  tasks  and  underline  in  question.     Section  III  –  Appreciation  of  Art.  Ordinary  Level  2012   16.  Answer  (a)  and  (b).     (a)  Name  an  art  gallery  or  museum  or  interpretative  centre  that  you  have  visited  and     describe  two  exhibits  that  you  found  interesting  and  explain  why.     (b)  Describe  how  your  visit  would  influence  you  in  planning  an  exhibition  of  art  work     in  your  own  school.      Illustrate  your  answer.     Task  1:     Task  2:     Task  3:     Task  4:       Separate  this  exam  question  into  tasks  and  underline  in  question.     SECTION  II  -­‐  European  Art      (1000  AD  –  Present).  Higher  2012.   Masaccio’s  (1401-­‐1428)  grasp  of  perspective  and  three-­‐dimensional  modelling  is  seen     in  the  “The  Tribute  Money”  which  is  illustrated  on  the  accompanying  sheet.       Discuss  Masaccio’s  work  with  detailed  reference  to  the  Tribute  Money,  the  period  in     which  it  was  produced,  its  subject  matter,  composition,  materials  and  the  techniques     used  in  its  production.     and   Name  and  briefly  discuss  one  other  artist  from  this  period.         Illustrate  your  answer.     Task  1:                                                                                                                                      Task  2:     Task3:                                                                                                                                        Task  4:     Task  5:                                                                                                                                      Task  6:     Task  7:                                                                                                                                      Task  8:      
  • 79.  ©   Page  79     Redraft  the  following  question  using  art  terms  from  worksheet  one.     Jot  down  what  you  know  about  the  work  of  an  artist  or  chat  about  a  couple  of  pictures.   Don’t  forget  to  put  in  stuff  on  what  makes  him/her  so  god,  what  it’s  all  about,  what  they   used  to  put  it  all  together  (paint  and  stuff).  And  remember  to  draw  a  picture  or  two  to   help  explain  your  answer.       Student  redraft  of  question                     Example  answer  when  student  is  finished  (conceal  from  student)       Describe  and  discuss  the  work  of  your  chosen  artist/designer  making  detailed  reference     to  two  specific  works.  Refer  to  style,  subject  matter,  materials/media,  techniques  and     influences.                  Illustrate  your  answer.                          
  • 80.  ©   Page  80      Word  Search   Using this word search is a fun way to reinforce vocabulary and aid studentsʼ comprehension.   How?   1. The  objective  of  a  word  search  puzzle  is  to  find  and  mark   all  the  words  hidden  inside  the  box.     2. The   words   may   be   arranged   horizontally,   vertically   or   diagonally.       3. Students   are   provided   with   a   list   of   words,   but   more   challenging  puzzles  may  let  the  students  figure  them  out.     Applications   — To  reinforce  keyword  vocabulary.   — A  way  of  developing  comprehension  and  understanding  of  a  particular  topic.   — To  encourage  deeper  engagement  with  the  reading  material       Literacy   Purposes     Thinking   Emotional   intelligence   Independence   Interdependence   Multi-­‐sensation   Fun   Articulation   *****   ***   **   *   **   ***   ****   *****   Other  Skills       Individual  work   Group  work   Moving   Speaking   Listening   Reading   Writing   Looking   Choice   *****   ****     **   *   ***   ****   ***   ****   Specific  Room   Layout                Yes       No  
  • 81.  ©   Page  81     Why  Do  it?   1. Word  searches  are  useful  for  the  building  of  vocabulary.     2. It  is  a  way  of  teaching  synonyms  and  antonyms  and  keeps  new  vocabulary  words   in  front  of  the  students  so  they  see  them.     3. Exposure  to  new  words  better  the  chances  they  will  make  them  their  own  and  use   them  on  a  daily  basis  to  reinforce  a  particular  skill.   4. There   is   a   kinaesthetic   element   to   this   activity,   which   helps   students   to   stay   focused.     Variations   • Can  be  an  individual  or  group  activity.   • This  activity  can  be  used  to  reinforce  keywords  at  the  end  of  a  lesson.   • Can  be  set  as  a  homework  activity.     Additional  Resources   • http://www.discoveryeducation.com/…   Appendix   • Attached  an  examples  of  a  Neo-­‐Impressionism  word  search.                    
  • 82.  ©   Page  82     Neo-­‐Impressionism  Word  Search                                       C   A   K   B   G   I   X   D   W   W   P   T   W   S   V       V   L   S   R   R   Q   F   F   W   O   D   A   D   L   O       G   S   A   F   Y   U   J   O   I   K   N   R   I   A   D       L   N   N   I   D   S   S   N   Y   M   Q   U   S   S   I       D   D   C   E   Y   X   T   H   Q   M   T   E   Q   K   V       C   L   Y   T   Y   I   H   K   S   X   E   S   R   G   I       C   O   M   P   L   E   M   E   N   T   A   R   Y   S   S       S   B   L   I   T   H   I   O   X   H   R   T   K   N   I       I   T   S   O   C   S   I   G   N   A   C   O   Z   S   O       S   M   O   N   U   T   A   B   W   J   P   P   K   G   N       H   H   E   D   I   R   W   R   J   N   Q   T   G   E   I       M   R   V   Y   V   N   S   S   T   S   L   I   G   I   S       F   K   F   R   A   P   Y   T   G   N   O   C   F   T   M       E   L   U   E   R   V   E   H   C   M   O   S   V   J   J       E   T   T   A   J   D   O   F   V   Z   M   C   H   J   G                                         BRUSHSTROKES   CHEVREUL   COLOUR   COMPLEMENTARY   CONTRAST   DIVISIONISM   DOTS     GRAND  JATTE   OPTICS   POINTILISM   SEURAT   FRENCH   SIGNAC    
  • 83.  ©   Page  83                       Additonal  Literacy  Information  and   Activities                          
  • 84.  ©   Page  84     SMOG  Readability  Test     The   SMOG   formula   developed   by   McLaughlin   (1969)   suggested   that   the   name   stood   for   “Simple  Measure  Of  Gobbledygook”.  It  is  a  useful  tool  for  gauging  readability  as  it  gives  a   figure  that  can  be  compared  to  the  reading  age  of  the  students.  The  higher  the  readability   figure  the  more  difficult  the  passage.  Follow  these  simple  steps  and  you  will  get  a  rough   guide  to  the  reading  level  of  the  book.     Open  the  textbook  in  three  different  places  at  random  and  use  the  SMOG  formula.   1. Select  a  text.       2. Count  10  sentences  together  from  that  text  to  work  on.         3. Count  the  number  of  words  in  those  sentences  that  have  3  or  more   syllables       4. Multiply  this  by  3.             5. Circle  the  number  below  which  is  closest  to  your  answer:     1    4    9    16    25    36    49    64    81    100    121    144    169       6. Find  the  square  root  of  the  number  you  circled     Number   1   4   9   16   25   36   49   64   81   100   121   144   169   Square   Root   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13     7. Add  8  to  your  answer  to  get  the  readability  level.         3 x ______ = ______ Adapted  from  ‘Between  the  Lines’    Literacy  at  Junior  Cycle  by  Aideen  Cassidy  and  Bernadette  Kiely.  
  • 85.  ©   Page  85     Before,  During,  After  Reading   Reading  is  an  interactive  process  of  constructing  meaning  and  the  following  strategies  will   help  students  in  the  reading-­‐thinking  process.     The  Before,  During  and  After  Approach  to  reading  contains  these  strategic  elements:     BEFORE  READING     DURING  READING     AFTER  READING       • Identify  the  purpose  of  the   text  (factual  or  narrative)   • Activating  background   knowledge  (K-­‐W-­‐L)  Chart   • Identify  the  text  type  and   features   • Reviewing  and  clarifying   vocabulary   • Key  words   • Text  layout   • Visual  literacy   • Background  knowledge   • Punctuation  patterns   • Phonic/Spelling  patterns   • Motivation/purpose  for   reading  the  text   • Critical  literacy   • Literacy  devices     • Vocabulary   • Predicting   • Checking  for   meaning/clarifying   • Questioning   • Linking  the  visual  and  the   written   • Re-­‐reading  for  meaning   • Articulating  reading   strategies     • What  have  we  learnt?   • How  will  this  help  us  with   future  learning?   • Paraphrasing  important   information   • Identifying  the  main  idea   and  details   • Making  comparisons   • Connecting     • Drawing  conclusions   • Summarise   • Analysing  (Students  make   judgments  and  form   opinions  using  explicit   information  from  the   reading)   • Critical  literacy   • Activities   • Assessment        
  • 86.  ©   Page  86     Writing  Frames   Writing  art  essays  and  reports  is  a  challenge   for  students  at  every  level.    Differentiation   requires  that  we  break  down  the  difficult   task  of  writing  extended  pieces  of  work,   giving  students  a  ‘ladder’  up  to  this  high-­‐ order  skill.   There  are  a  number  of  ways  of  assisting   students  with  their  writing,  including:   • Breaking  the  writing  task  down  into  a   series  of  tasks.       • Worksheets.   • Writing  frames.     • Showing  students  exemplar  work  and  asking  them  to  grade  this  and  learn  from  it   • Making  your  learning  outcomes,  assessment  criteria  and  grade  descriptors  explicit   and  clear.     Benefits  of  writing  frames     Writing  frames  can  help  students  by:   • Providing  students  with  starting  points  when  confronted  with  a  blank  sheet  of  paper.   • Writing  frames  offer  a  structure  and  overview  for  the  piece  of  writing.   • Raising  motivation  and  esteem  by  helping  students  write  successfully.   • Discouraging  copying  by  providing  a  structure  that  helps  students  to  understand,   select  and  structure  information  appropriately.   • Encouraging  students  to  move  to  higher  levels  of  structuring  and  expressing  their   ideas.  If  planned  appropriately,  writing  frames  are  an  excellent  way  of  differentiating   tasks  to  meet  the  needs  of  all  students.     Beware  of  the  following:   • Limiting  creativity.  Students  do  not  have  to  stick  to  the  writing  frame.   • Students  becoming  too  dependent  on  frames.  Avoid  this  by  encouraging  students  to   in  construct  their  own  writing  frames  and  help  them  internalise  the  process  so  that   no  frame  is  needed.   • Setting  the  frames  in  stone  (by  printing  off  hundreds  or  laminating  them  for  all  time).   Allow  scope  for  adaptation  and  development.    
  • 87.  ©   Page  87     ART  CRITICISM   DESCRIBE  –  ANALYSE  –  INTERPRET  –  EVALUATE   Edmund  Feldman,  Professor  of  Art  at  the  University  of  Georgia,  developed  an  easy  four-­‐step  method  for   evaluating  a  work  of  art.   This   strategy   provides   students   with   structure   for   viewing   artwork   and   reflecting   on   the   content   that   is   contained  in  the  imagery.   Describe   • Name  the  artist     • Name  the  artwork     • When  was  the  work  created?     • What  objects  are  in  the  painting?     • What  time  of  day  or  night  is  it?     • How  can  you  tell?     • What  is  the  mood  of  the  work?     Analyse   • What  is  in  the  foreground,  mid-­‐ground,  background?     • How  has  the  picture  been  arranged.     • What  colours  are  used  and  how  have  they  been  arranged?     • What  shapes  are  there  and  how  have  they  been  arranged?     • Are  there  any  leading  lines  and  if  so,  where  is  your  eye  lead?   • Is  there  any  use  of  contrast?  If  so  where.   • Is  there  any  use  of  pattern?  if  so  where.     • Is  there  a  sense  of  space  or  perspective.     • Are  there  any  special  techniques  employed  by  the  artist?   • How  has  the  artist  used  colour  in  this  work?     • How  was  texture  used  in  this  artwork?     • How  were  light  and  dark  tones  used  in  this  work?     Interpret/Meaning       • What  do  you  think  the  artist  was  trying  to  say  through  this   work?     • How  does  this  work  relate  to  you  and  your  life?     • Why  did  the  artist  create  this  work?     • What  is  the  theme  of  this  work?     Evaluate/Opinion       • Has  your  first  impression  of  this  work  changed?  If  so,  what          made  you  change  your  mind?   • What  value  does  this  work  have?  (Beautiful  work  of  art,  shows          important  message,  religious  belief,  etc.)  Support  your  opinion.   • What  have  you  seen  or  learned  from  this  work  that  will  change                      something  about  you?    
  • 88.  ©   Page  88     Structure   Useful  starters   Useful  Vocabulary   Introduction:  describe   the  work  –  pretend   you  are  telling   someone  who  cannot   see  it     ………………..  was  completed  by…………….  in   …………….     The  work  portrays  ….     suggests,  conveys,  conjures  up,   recalls,  recreates,  when  looked  at   closely,  from  a  distance   Artist’s  intention       I  think  the  artist  is  trying  to………..   The  reason  I  think  this  is  because  ………….   exaggerate,  distort,  conjure  up,   recreate,  observe,  reflect,  express   mood  or  ideas,  explore  material,  line,   tone,  texture,  colour,  shape,  see,   feel,  think,  imagine   Source  of  inspiration   and  influences     I  think  the  artist  worked  from  ………….  because   …………….   The  artist  prepared  for  this  work  by  …………….   observation     memory   imagination   supporting  sketches   photographs     Your  reaction     The  work  makes  me  feel    ………….  because   ……………….   happy,  sad,  suggests,  evokes,   conveys,  mood,  feeling,  atmosphere,   recalls,  reminds  me  of   Use  of  form     The  work  has  been  composed  to  ……………………   balanced,  symmetrical,  foreground,   background,  arrangement,   composition,  design,  strong  lines,   lead  the  eye,  shapes,  small,  large,   angular,  curved.     Use  of  colour  tone   and  texture     The  artist’s  use  of  ……………….  suggests   ……………………   I  think  he/she  has  done  this  to  suggest   …………………………   hot,  cold,  bright,  dull,  vivid,  sombre,   pastel,  clashing,  matching,  range,   variety,  rough,  smooth,  broken   Style     The  artists  style  is  …………………   I  can  tell  this  by    ……………………..   Technique,  abstract,  realistic,   surrealistic     Conclusion     I  like/dislike  this  work  because    ………………….        
  • 89.  ©   Page  89      Word  Meaning  Checklist   A  checklist  is  useful  to  help  students  become  aware  of  when  they  do  and  do  not  understand  the   meaning  of  words.   Word  Meaning  Checklist     Topic:        General Art Terms                      Name:    ______________________________     Read  each  word,  Put  a  tick  in  the  column  that  states  how  well  you  know  this  word.     Words     I  Know  it  well.   I  use  it     I  know  it  a  bit     I’ve  seen  it  or   heard  of  it.     I’ve  never   heard  of  it.   Chiaroscuro           Composition           Emulsion           Gouache           Impasto           Sfumato           Zoomorphic           Imprint           Intaglio           Monogram           Tempera           Painterly           Perspective           Figurative           Abstract           Contemporary           Genre            
  • 90.  ©   Page  90     Predicting  Meaning   Word   Page  or   context   What  I  think  the  word   might  mean   Dictionary  help   (if  needed)   Retell  in  my  own   words  or  draw  a   picture  to  show   the  meaning                                          
  • 91.  ©   Page  91     Match  key  words  to  given  definitions  
  • 92.  ©   Page  92      Annotating  Images           The  Arnofini  Wedding   Jan  Van  Eych   ! Dog symbol of fertility Shoe indicates holy Ground Single candle is a symbol of God’s presence The inscription on the back wall translates “Jan Van Eyck was here, 1434” suggests that the artist was a witness to the wedding Crystal prayer beads on the wall and the image of Saint Margaret protector of women in childbirth, carved on the top of a high- backed chair next to a bed … suggest the piety of the couple. Fruit symbol of innocence Green is the symbolic colour of fertility. She is not pregnant: the pose simply emphasises the stomach, which at the time was regarded as a focus of beauty. It could also perhaps indicate fertility?
  • 93.  ©   Page  93      321  Strategy     3   2   1   Things  I  learned   Things  I  found  interesting   Things  I  don’t  understand                                    
  • 94.  ©   Page  94      SQ3R   SQ3R  is  a  useful  technique  for  fully  absorbing  written  information.  It  helps  you  to  create  a   good  mental  framework  of  a  subject,  into  which  you  can  fit  facts  correctly.  It  helps  you  to   set   study   goals.   It   also   prompts   you   to   use   the   review   techniques   that   will   help   to   fix   information  in  your  mind.   The  acronym  SQ3R  stands  for  the  five  sequential  techniques  you  should  use  to  read  a  book:   Survey   Question   Read   Recite   Recall   Look  at  cover,  title,   illustrations,  first   sentence,   headings,  last   paragraph.   What  do  you  know   about  the  topic   already,  what’s  the   author’s  purpose  in   writing  this,  is  it   fact  or  opinion,  is   there  any  evidence   of  bias?   Ask  yourself  what   is  this  about.   What  do  I  need  to   know?  Are  there   questions  I  have   to  answer?   Specific   information  I   must  find?  What   evidence  is  there   for  the  points   made?   Read  the  passage     carefully,  identify   main  idea  and   details.   Can  you  follow   the  sequence  of   events,   distinguish   between  facts   and  opinions?   Re-­‐read  the  parts   you  think  are   important  and   any  parts  you  are   not  sure  of.   Note  key  points.   Summarise  points   for  your   classmate.   This  is  done   with  the  book   closed.  Have   the  questions   been   answered?   Remember  the   key-­‐  words  or   main  points.   Tell  your   classmate.     Graphic  Organisers   Graphic   organizers   are   known   by   different   names,   such   as   maps,   webs,   graphs,   charts,   frames,  or  clusters.   Regardless   of   the   label,   graphic   organizers   can   help   learners   focus   on   concepts   and   how   they  are  related  to  other  concepts.       Fauvism   1904  -­‐1908   Henri  Mazsse   Andre  Derain   Wild  brushwork,   primary  colours,   simplified  subject   ma|er  and   abstraczon.  
  • 95.  ©   Page  95           Georges   Seurat   Sunday   A}ernoon  on   the  Island  of   La  Grande   Ja|e   Poinzllism   Divisionism   Dots   Neo-­‐ Impressionist  French   Bathers  at   Asnières   Shape   Organic   Natural  world   Human  forms   Geometric     Manmade   forms    
  • 96.  ©   Page  96       Examples  can  be  found  at:-­‐   www.slss.ie/resources/c/1138/GraphicOrganiser%5FFinal%2Epdf     Impressionism   1870s-­‐1900   Subject  Maler   Everyday  life  urban  living   People,  Places   Leisure  pursuits   Theatre,  Dance  halls   Materials   Un  primed   canvas   Poppy  seed  oil   instead  of   linseed   Spectrum   colours   Synthezc   pigments   Square  headed   brushes   Tubes  of  paint   Pastels   Characterismcs   Anz  academic   Synthesis’s  light  and   colour   Open  composizon   Unusual   perspeczves   Full  colour-­‐no  half   tones   Absence  of  Black  for   shadow   Black  was  a  colour  in   its  own  right   Capturing  reflected   and  refracted  light   Divided   brushstrokes   Where   Paris  and  its   environs   Countryside   Riverbanks   Armsts-­‐Painmng   Monet   Renoir   Degas   Morisot   Cassa|   Pissarro   Armsts-­‐ Sculpture   Auguste  Renoir  
  • 97.  ©   Page  97     Visual  Verbal  Squares          
  • 98.  ©   Page  98     Cloze  Test     A  cloze  test  exercise  is  a  "fill-­‐in-­‐the-­‐blanks"  activity  where  the  learner  uses  clues  from  a  list   of  words  that  have  been  deliberately  removed  from  the  text.   The   cloze   procedure   is   a   test   of   reading   comprehension.   Responses   reveal   both   text   comprehension  and  language  mastery  levels.   Paolo  Uccello  Cloze  Test   Tips         Read  over  the  words  in  the  box  a  few  times  before  reading  the  text.  Skip  the  spaces  you’re   not  sure  of  and  fill  in  the  ‘definites’  first.  The  first  two  have  been  done  as  a  guide.       realistic   forstortening     depth   Renaissance   San  Romano     recede   perspective   lifelike     artificial   fallen  figure   space       Paolo   Uccello   was   one   of   the   Renaissance artists   who   eagerly   accepted   new   Renaissance   ideas.   His   concern   for   ____________   is   evident   when   you   analyse   his   painting  The  Battle  of  ____  _________  .  Bodies  and  broken  spears  are  placed  in  such  a  way   that   they   lead   your   eye   into   the   picture.   Notice   the   _______   _______   in   the   lower   left   corner.  Here  Uccello  used  a  technique  known  as  ____________  ,  (drawing  figures  or  objects   according   to   the   rules   of   __________   so   that   they   appear   to   ________   or   protrude   into   three-­‐dimensional  _______  ).   Yet,  even  with  all  its  _______  ,  you  would  never  say  that  this  work  looks  _________  .  It  is   more   like   a   group   of   puppets   arranged   in   a   mock   battle   scene.   By   concentrating   on   __________  ,  Uccello’s  figures  and  their  actions  do  not  seem  ___________  .  The  world  that   he  painted  is  compromised  and  almost  looks  ___________  .    
  • 99.  ©   Page  99     Warm-­‐up  Activity  Ideas   Could  be  used  at  the  beginning  of  class  as  a  plenary  activity.   Anagrams     Name  of  an  artist/artwork   JEAN  ARP       PREJAAN     SALVADOR  DALI       LSRDOILAVAA   THE  MONA  LISA       SNHAAETOILM   THE  NATIONAL  GALLERY   YAAALILLGNONEH   GISLEBERTUS       LEBSUTRESIG   Odd  one  out     Provides  an  opportunity  for  students  to  debate  with  each  other.     1. Write  or  project    a  set  of  four  terms  on  the  board,   2. For  each  set,  students  identify  what  they  think  is  the  odd  one  out.   3. Ask  students  to  feedback  and  justify  their  answers.   4. Devise  lists  which  allow  for  more  than  one  possible  answer  in  order  to  promote  further   discussion.     LINEAR   LINO   COIL   REGISTRATION   WAX   PALETTE   OIL  PAINT   BRUSH   VAN  GOGH   CEZANNE   GAUGAIN   SEURAT   BLUE   GREEN   RED   PURPLE   REALISM   SURREALISM   PERSPECTIVE   POP  ART   TEMPERA   CANVAS   BRUSH   BRONZE   WEAVE   NEEDLE   APPLIQUÉ   CARVE   POLLOCK   DONATELLO   OLDENBURG     RODIN   NAVE   AISLE   AMBULATORY   PORTAL     Hangman     Name  of  artist/artwork  –  parts  of  body  can  be  parts  of  famous  painting.    
  • 100.  ©   Page  100     Useful  Websites   http://www.jcspliteracy.com/   www.pdst.ie   http://www.nbss.ie/   http://www.nala.ie/   http://www.ncse.ie/   http://www.ncca.ie/        
  • 101.   ©