What public water supplies should learn from bottled water brands

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The bottled-water industry is exceptional at branding. What one brand positions as an advantage, another characterizes as a shortcoming. The public water sector needs to lear

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What public water supplies should learn from bottled water brands

  1. 1. Nebraska Section AWWA Water-Tasting Competition 2013 Fall Conference Kearney, Nebraska
  2. 2. Presented by the Public Information Committee Mary Poe (DHHS), chair Jami Cerone (HDR) Eric Obert (JEO) Brian Gongol (DJ Gongol)
  3. 3. Taste Testers
  4. 4. Scoring Flavor Scent Appearance Aftertaste (all on a 1 to 10 scale)
  5. 5. And while they're tasting...
  6. 6. Are you delivering premium water without even knowing it?
  7. 7. What makes for a premium water? People pay for perceived quality
  8. 8. So premium quality is...? Special treatment, purification, or minerals
  9. 9. The funny thing is... There's not much difference between high-priced bottled waters and many municipal waters
  10. 10. Let's glance at what's inside
  11. 11. Exhibit #1: Aquafina
  12. 12. Look! It's been purified!
  13. 13. From an exotic source? Nope.
  14. 14. Exhibit #2: Crystal Geyser
  15. 15. "Bottled at the source"
  16. 16. "Bottled at the source" Couldn't the same be said if you have storage tanks near your wells?
  17. 17. Clever marketing: "There is a difference"
  18. 18. Powerful suggestive words: "Mountain" "Spring" "Geyser" "Alpine" "Crystal"
  19. 19. Exhibit #3: Dasani
  20. 20. Purified, with minerals added... "for taste"
  21. 21. Does a "green" bottle make a product environmentally friendly?
  22. 22. Salt added
  23. 23. Dasani water quality info could not be located for this presentation
  24. 24. Exhibit #4: Evian
  25. 25. From the French Alps
  26. 26. Mineral content as desirable selling point
  27. 27. How many groundwater systems tout filtration through "mineral-rich sands and soils"?
  28. 28. Is it better because it's traveled thousands of miles?
  29. 29. Exhibit #5: Fiji
  30. 30. Better because it's artesian?
  31. 31. How many times is your public water "touched by man"?
  32. 32. How deep must a well be to qualify as coming from "deep within the earth"?
  33. 33. From Fiji to Kearney: 6,591 miles
  34. 34. Exhibit #6: Glacier Clear
  35. 35. Purified, but not really from a glacier
  36. 36. It's from Minneapolis
  37. 37. Exhibit #7: Ice Mountain
  38. 38. Is your public water "Pure", "Quality", "Natural"?
  39. 39. From Michigan
  40. 40. Do consumers use less plastic when they drink from the tap?
  41. 41. Are your well sites "carefully selected"?
  42. 42. Exhibit #8: Nestle Pure Life
  43. 43. "Enhanced with minerals"
  44. 44. From an Indiana public water supply
  45. 45. Exhibit #9: Perrier
  46. 46. Mineral content commands a premium price
  47. 47. "Mineral water" but "Low mineral content"
  48. 48. Is well-traveled water somehow better water?
  49. 49. One bottle: 8% of your daily calcium
  50. 50. Exhibit #10: Resource
  51. 51. Electrolytes "for taste"
  52. 52. "Natural spring water with naturally-occurring electrolytes"
  53. 53. Exhibit #11: Smart Water
  54. 54. Vapor-distilled, with electrolytes added
  55. 55. Positioning distilled water against spring water: Clouds vs. the ground
  56. 56. Bottled at multiple sites
  57. 57. So...how about those electrolytes?
  58. 58. The following data comes from the websites (or labels) of the respective brands
  59. 59. Bicarbonates
  60. 60. Calcium
  61. 61. Chlorides
  62. 62. Magnesium
  63. 63. Nitrates
  64. 64. pH
  65. 65. Potassium
  66. 66. Sodium
  67. 67. Sulfates
  68. 68. Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)
  69. 69. Important note None of this is intended to denigrate the products shown
  70. 70. Bottled water brands have a lot to teach us in the public water sector
  71. 71. Take credit for your source quality
  72. 72. Take credit for your treatment process
  73. 73. Take credit for your "electrolytes"
  74. 74. Help people understand that they get bottled-water "quality" almost for free
  75. 75. Source data http://www.aquafina.com/downloads/bottledWaterInformation_en.pdf http://www.crystalgeyserasw.com/docs/Bottled%20Water%20Report%202013%20-%20benton%20TN.pdf http://www.dasani.com/dasani/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/dasani_report.pdf http://www.evian.com/files/Evian%20AWQR%202012%20ENG%20All%20Other%20States.pdf http://www.fijiwater.com/media/newsroom/FW_waterquality.pdf http://www.drinksmartwater.com/img/smartwater_water_quality.pdf http://premiumwaters.com/assets/files/quality/2013_Chippewa_RO_English.pdf http://www.nestle-watersna.com/asset-library/Documents/IM_BWQR.pdf http://www.nestle-watersna.com/asset-library/Documents/PL_ENG.pdf http://www.perrier.com/en/discoverperrier.html http://www.nestle-watersna.com/asset-library/Documents/R_ENG.pdf
  76. 76. Thanks for your attention! ● And thanks to our water-tasting contest participants and judges ● For details from this presentation, contact Brian Gongol: brian@gongol.net

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