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From Telephony VUI to Smartphone NUI
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From Telephony VUI to Smartphone NUI

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Moving from design of unimodal speech-enabled applications to multi- modal smartphone applications is not always straightforward. Bouzid highlights fundamental differences between these contexts and ...

Moving from design of unimodal speech-enabled applications to multi- modal smartphone applications is not always straightforward. Bouzid highlights fundamental differences between these contexts and how we can transfer what we have learned from telephony-based IVR space to build highly usable voice solutions on the smartphone platform. Kelly discusses how understanding users, their environments, their devices, and available software tools can allow organizations to create powerful, engaging multimodal designs.

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From Telephony VUI to Smartphone NUI From Telephony VUI to Smartphone NUI Presentation Transcript

  • From Telephony VUI to Smartphone NUI Ahmed Bouzid, Head of Product, Angel August 14, 2012
  • Moving from the Phone to the Smartphone
  • Why Spoken Conversation?§  Speech is Natural§  Conversation is Natural§  Speech is efficient: speaking requires less effort than typing§  Use cases •  Dictation •  When searching is easier than selecting •  Several interactions that require simple responses •  Hands are busy •  Eyes are busy •  Short questions from device •  Short responses from user •  Sharing a spoken joke with friends
  • Why Conversation?Multi-step Interactions aimed at solving a problem/accomplishing somethingUser: What is Chipotle trading at?App: Chipotle Mexican Grill is at $321.56. Up just a tad.User: What’s the highest it has been in the last three months?App: July 10 was highest in the last 3 months, trading at $344.21.User: Buy 100 shares.App: You have Schwab and Fidelity. Which would you like?User: Schwab.App: Got it. I see you have an account ending in 2234. Use that account?”User: Yes.App: OK. 100 shares at Market or at a Specific Price?User: Market.App: Got it. That trade has been placed for 100 shares at market. I will send you an email confirmation when the shares are purchased.
  • Telephony VUI§  IVR is intrusive: Caller called to speak to a human (Serving not the caller but the business)§  Only the Audio Mode: For input (Speech, DTMF), For output (Voice and sounds)§  Clear interaction End Points§  Interaction is Time Metered (Utility business model)§  User must give their Full Attention to IVR§  Personalization potential: low§  Low sound quality: Played to caller and spoken by caller
  • Smartphone NUI§  User engages UI Voluntarily: I want to speak to my assistant§  Multi-modality available: user gets to input in more than one mode§  Start and End points are Fuzzy§  Interaction is Task focused: engage to accomplish a specific task (Task Completion business model)§  Multiple Tasks on at the same time§  User Not Trapped in the interaction: may Pause and return at their leisure. Pausing is natural§  Personalization potential: high§  User seems to tolerate Delays more on Smartphone than IVR§  High Sound Quality: Played to user spoken by caller
  • Telephony VUI vs Smartphone NUI     Telephony   Smartphone   Engagement  Type   Compulsory   Voluntary   Interac5on  Modes   Exclusively  Audio   Mul5-­‐modal   Interac5on  Unit   Time   Task   Interac5on  End  Points   Clear   Fuzzy   ABen5on  Monopoly   High   Low   Tolera5on  for  Delays   Low   High   Sound  Quality   Low   High  
  • VUI Strategies§  Pausing: –  In telephony need full VUI –  In Smartphone, just stop and then resume§  Latency –  Telephony: Percolation sounds –  Smartphone: Visuals§  Error Strategies –  VUI: NI/NM §  Pause if no inputs in Smartphone §  Use MM if no match on Smartphone §  More room to help with handling errors: §  Display what user can say §  Offer tutorials to user –  Non-VUI §  Telephony: Hold the caller until transaction is done. §  Smartphone: Asynchronous alerting. Don’t need to hold the user. Send alert when transaction done.
  • UI Strategy DifferencesBehavior   Telephony  VUI   Smartphone  NUI  Pausing   Taxing  on  caller   Leverage  Visual  Latency   Limited  to  Audio   Leverage  Visual  Error  Strategies   Taxing  on  caller   Leverage  visual  Web  Service  Comple5on   Hold  the  caller  un5l  done   Message  the  user  when  done  
  • Conversational NUI-  Transaction requires multiple pieces of information-  Complex requests that can be efficiently formulated in a sentence: “What’s the highest it has been in the last three months?”-  Short responses from user: “Schwab,” “Yes,” “Market.”-  Short commands from user: “Buy 100 shares.”
  • How Visual helps Audio•  Redundancy•  Visual Confirmation•  No match issues: present menu to select option/or give keyboard to type•  Help: visual help more effective than spoken help•  Complementary info: Show bill/show device•  When visual is needed: location in bill•  Summary of info. collected•  Enable user to quickly correct info provided earlier
  • Pause Case§  Pause Point: where in the conversation did the pause occur§  Age of Pause: how long ago? –  If resuming ordering a book from 5 minutes ago, then ask if want to continue –  If resuming ordering a book from 5 hours ago: then ask if want to continue + provide summary of where left off –  If resuming ordering book from 5 days ago: then start from scratch (maybe selections are obsolete, etc.).
  • Multi-Tasking Issues §  Task suspension and resumption §  Task stacking §  Abandonment Management §  Task prioritization §  Local- versus remote-transaction contention resolution