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The creative talent

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presented at the Conference "Mind in Movement" - University of Pavia (Italy) 2011

presented at the Conference "Mind in Movement" - University of Pavia (Italy) 2011

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  • 1. the Creative TalentMassimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 2. introducing myselfI’m a psychologist and a psychotherapist, working with individuals and families . I’malso a supervisor in social services for childrenI teach the so called “Milan Approach” to systemic psychotherapy at the Milan Centreof Family TherapyI also teach in the Conservatory of Music, Cuneo and lead learning groups in theUniversity of PaviaI’m a member of the International Association for the Study of Dreams. I’m currentlyserving as a Member of the Board of Directors in the period 2011 – 2013I’m an amateur musician and I play violin in the Orchestra Sinfonica AmatorialeItalianaas an author, I focus on creative change related to dreams and music. My last book is“The Composer’s Dream”, published by Pari Publishing Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 3. in this presentation, consistently with thesubject and with the ideas I’ll bring forth, Iwill rely not only on verbal language butalso on other languages, mainly onmusic, and I will make a frequent use ofmetaphors Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 4. I claim that being gifted with a creative talentmeans having peculiar abilities in translationand re-translation of experiences occurringinto different realms of reality, each onespeaking its own peculiar language Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 5. thus, creativity will be considered mainly in arelational frame, so that“to be creative” meansto be able to evoke, in someone else,experiences putting in dynamiccommunication different “layers” and realmsof reality such as: Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 6. - the nearly chaotic basis of consciousness, bothindividual and collective- the narrative description of the self (“identity”both of individuals and of communities)- the bodily aspects of reality (throughmovement, sensitivity and perception)- the symbolic aspects of reality (languages) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 7. examples Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 8. Massimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 9. in this piece of music the basic sounds ofnature, like chirps, evoke and getintertwined with the basic structures ofwestern tonal music, like simples scales andarpeggios.It all raises up into the listener the echoes ofexperiences such that in verbal languagethey could be defined as “the beauty andhappiness of a natural way of life” Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 10. a feeling like this is quite clearly expressed by CarlGustav Jung in his “Memories, Dreams Reflections”when speaking about his stay in the “Tower” hebuilt in Bollingen.In Bollingen silence surrounds me in a nearly sensibleway, and I live “in a modest harmony with nature”.Thoughts occur that date back in centuries, and inthe meantime they anticipate a future far fromnow; struggle for creation is appeased: creativityand play are side by side. Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 11. Edvard Grieg’sbreathing and musicexcerpts from Peer Gynt’s suitesMassimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 12. Edvard Grieg was born 1843 in Bergen, Norway.When he was 16 studying at the Conservatory inLeipzig (De), contracted TBC. He gave up to laterresume, but fret over the incompleteness of hisstudies ever since.His left lung completely collapsed so that he couldbreath only with a part of his right lung. All life longhe suffered from breathing disease worsening thedepression he fell into in 1869 because of the deathof his only 13 months daughter. The consequencesof breathing issues on the cardiac muscle led him todeath at the age of 64. Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 13. despite his very serious troubles in breathing, untiladvanced age Grieg used to be a strong mountainhikerin 1874 Henrik Ibsen invited him to write the stagemusic for his drama Peer Gyntin 1888 and 1891, out of those 22 pieces of music,Grieg drew the most famous Symphonic Suitesechoes of his health state and habits can be easilydetected in this music Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 14. morning moodMassimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 15. Aase’s deathMassimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 16. Massimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 17. thanks to its incipit on the weak tempo (anacrusis),the sorely simple cells raising all the first movement ofthe 5th Symphony recall to memory the sound ofpopular dances from the european tradition like“sarabanda” or “allemanda” (deutsche)in turn it recalls the unresolved issue of Beethoven’slife: “the yearn for a normal life”, meanwhile his wholelife was overwhelmed with the peculiar troubles andjoys of creativitya demanding “destiny knocking at his door”, onceagain… Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 18. creativity implies vicinity to chaosin personal identityin mental healthin cognitive pathwaysin the process of creation itself Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 19. examples Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 20. vicinity to chaos in personal identityand belongings Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 21. Gioachino Rossini (1792 – 1868)was his father “Il Vivazza “, or the Count Andrea Perticari? On 29 February 1792 a beautiful baby boy was born in Pesaro and was christened the same day with the names Giovacchino and Antonia, his paternal grandparents. Indeed, just five months had passed since the baby’s parents were married. The mother, Anna Guidarini, about twenty years old, was a pretty young dressmaker gifted with a nice soprano voice. The father, who was already thirty-three, was a horn player and had arrived from Lugo di Romagna to take on the role of trumpet player in the town. He was known as Il Vivazza (a man with an exuberant character), but his real name was Giuseppe Antonio Rossini. But serious doubts regarding Gioachino being biologically the son of Vivazza have been put forward. He was a beautiful boy with noble features…perhaps Anna’s spring passion flared up whilst squeezed in an aristocratic embrace, that of Count Andrea Perticari, it is said. Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 22. Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)used to consider himself as being born in 1772 insteadthan 1770 and was pleased of the widespread gossipthat he was son of a King of Prussia. All life long hecomplained for being a misunderstood aristocrat.Richard Wagner (1813 - 1883)the true story of his birth would take the entirepresentation… most likely his real father was not thePolice Officer Friedrich Wilhelm Wagner, but theactor, playwright and portraitist Ludwig Geyer (whobore a pretty Jewish last name!)Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791)entire books have been written on the controversialstory of his death and burial Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 23. vicinity to chaos in mental health Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 24. Gioachino Rossini (1792 – 1868)suffered from a severe depression for around25 years one thing the creative person and the psychically suffering personshare is a condition of sensitivity, a magnified condition relative to theaverage person. The creative person is more vulnerable than the averageperson in regard to the mystery of being, in which he participates in amuch more intense way than others. “In sensitivity one exposes oneself, one exposes a nude more nude than the skin which, as form and beauty, inspires the statuesquearts: the nude of a skin offered for contact, for a caress that always –even equivocally in voluptuousness – is a suffering for the suffering ofothers.” Emmanuel Lévinas Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 25. vicinity to chaos in cognitive pathways Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 26. Wouldnt you like to visit Herr Gold-smith again?-but what for?--what?--nothing!-just to inquire, Iguess, about the Spuni Cuni fait, nothing else.nothing else?-well, well, all right. Long live allthose who, who-who-who-how does it go on?-Inow wish you a good night, shit in your bed with allyour might, sleep with peace on your mind, and tryto kiss your own behind; I now go off to never-never land and sleep as much as I can stand.Tomorrow well speak freak sensubly with eachother. Things I must you tell a lot of, believe it youhardly can, but hear tomorrow it already will you,be well in the meantime. Oh my ass burns like fire! an excerpt from awhat on earth is the meaning of this!-maybe muckwants to come out? yes, yes, muck, I know you, Wolfgang’s letter tosee you, taste you-and-whats this--is it possible? his cousin MariaYe Gods!-Oh ear of mine, are you deceiving me?- Anna Thekla,No, its true-what a long and melancholic sound!- November 5th, 1777today is the write I fifth this letter. Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 27. vicinity to chaos in the creative process Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 28. a Giacomo Puccini’s autograph of one page of “the Girl from the Golden West”Massimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 29. the story of the Bach’s “Air on the G string”at the beginning of a story its location in timea space is fundamental, but when we searchfor reference points in the chronology ofBach’s musical production, we inevitablystumble across problems that trigger endlesscontroversies among scholars Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 30. Massimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 31. actually it is almost always difficult, and at timesimpossible, to date Johann Sebastian Bach’s musicalproduction preciselywe have to make use of hypothetical expressionsthat give a sensation of suspension: ‘it seems…’, ‘itemerges…’, ‘presumably…’, almost…’it seems that Bach composed the Orchestral Suite inD major (BWV 1068), presumably between 1729 and1737, in Leipzig where he conducted the CollegiumMusicum founded by Telemann Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 32. the suite consists of five movements; the second ofthese is the Ariait is almost certain that he obtained the suite fromone of his previous compositions with concertanteviolin dating back to the final period of his stay inKöthen, where he had served as Kapellmeister to thecourt of Prince Leopold between 1717 and 1723 Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 33. here the problems of dating the suite cannotbe said to be entirely solved: indeed, thoselistening to the second movement (adagio manon tanto) of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 6(BWV 1051) will recognize a very similar melodyin the fugue for two voices assigned to violas Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 34. Massimo SchincoConservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 35. if the Brandenburg Concertos bear the dedicationdate of March 24, 1721, several parts that wereintegrated into them were certainly composedpreviously; the oldest, amongst which is the ariaunder discussion here, probably date back to theWeimar period, between 1713 and 1717 Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 36. as on many other occasions, we have beforeus a musical idea that exists, albeit in variousforms, in an all but ephemeral way within thecomposerit is as if an idea would “visit” the creativeperson, and he or she has the skills necessaryfor receiving it and working on it later on  Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 37. the ordinary logics of causes and effectscannot be applied to creativitywe have not the time left now to dwell on it.I’ll just hint, For those who are fond of these inquiries, that, as ageneral model of explanation, I rely the most onDavid Bohm’s and F. David Peat’s insights onimplicate/explicate – and superimplicate - ordersgenerative ordersholomovement Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 38. all these models finally allow us to take seriously theimpression that, at times, creations create their authorsrather more than the other way round the same impression we have with dreaming both dreams and creativity sprout from theimplicate, enfolded, unexpressed side of reality, growsup in the explicate, unfolded, expressed one and to“the other side” they return in an unceasantmovement… …and when it’s over, it is for real Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 39. John Lennon1940 - 1980Yeah. I don’t believe in the Beatles, that’s all. I don’tbelieve in the Beatles myth. “I don’t believe in theBeatles”–there is no other way of saying it, is there?I don’t believe in them whatever they were supposedto be in everybody’s head, including our own headsfor a period. It was a dream. I don’t believe in thedream anymore.…And then the fuckin’ fans tried to beat me into being a fuckin’ Beatle or anEngelbert Humperdinck, and the critics tried to beat me into being PaulMcCartney. (from Jann Wenner’s interview on Rolling Stone Magazine, 1971 ) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 40. creative persons own the necessary skills toguarantee the unfolding of this process, which are:openness to chaos (inner thin boundaries) sensitivityselective attentioncapability of producing metaphors (creativity is notpsychosis – psychosis is a failure in the creativeprocess)capability of mastering a techniquecapability of waitingcapability of playingcapability of working and renouncing Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 41. the “price” that is paid:self-perception of diversity and isolationrigidity (tendency to yes/no attitude)exposure to violent oscillations of mood (exaltationvs. depression, anxiety vs. laziness)tendency to take things to the limitcompensatory behaviors (e.g. addictions,vulnerability in relationships)need of outer thick boundaries to protect the innerthin boundaries (e.g. tendency to affiliation to rigidsystems, narcissism) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 42. examples Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 43. John Lennon1940 - 1980Do you think you’re a genius?Yes, if there is such a thing as one, I am one.When did you first realize that?When I was about 12. I used to think I must be a genius, but nobody’s noticed. Iused to wonder whether I’m a genius or I’m not, which is it? I used to think, well, Ican’t be mad, because nobody’s put me away, therefore, I’m a genius. A genius isa form of madness, and we’re all that way, you know, and I used to be a bit coyabout it, like my guitar playing.If there is such a thing as genius–which is what... what the fuck is it?–I am one,and if there isn’t, I don’t care. I used to think it when I was a kid, writing me poetryand doing me paintings. I didn’t become something when the Beatles made it, orwhen you heard about me, I’ve been like this all me life. Genius is pain too. (from Jann Wenner’s interview on Rolling Stone Magazine, 1971) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 44. John Lennon1940 - 1980People like me are aware of their so-called genius at ten, eight, nine... I alwayswondered, “why has nobody discovered me?” In school, didn’t they see that I’mcleverer than anybody in this school? That the teachers are stupid, too? That allthey had was information that I didn’t need. I got fuckin’ lost in being at highschool. I used to say to me auntie “You throw my fuckin’ poetry out, and you’llregret it when I’m famous,” and she threw the bastard stuff out.I never forgave her for not treating me like a fuckin’ genius or whatever I was,when I was a child.It was obvious to me. Why didn’t they put me in art school? Why didn’t they trainme? Why would they keep forcing me to be a fuckin’ cowboy like the rest of them?I was different, I was always different. Why didn’t anybody notice me? (from Jann Wenner’s interview on Rolling Stone Magazine, 1971) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 45. Eric Clapton1945 -“(addiction to drugs or alcohol)… it is an obsession. A part ofmy personality is obsessed with pushing things to the limit. Itcan be of great use when my obsession is funneled intoconstructive thoughts or creativity, but it can be destructiveas well, mentally, physically or spiritually. I guess this is whathappens to an artist who,when he feels his mood swaying – something we all suffer from, when we are creative –instead of facing reality being aware that this is an opportunity of creation, turns himselfto something that will switch that mood off and stop that irritation. And this can bedrinking, heroin, or anything else.One doesn’t want to face that creative urge, because he knows the self-exploration thatshall be undertaken, the suffering that shall be carried on. This happens mainly, or in aquite painful way, to artists.Until they do not understand what it is that does this to them, they will keep doingsomething to kill this.” (from Robert Palmer’s interview on Rolling Stone Magazine, 1985) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 46. “consciousness is urge ofcreation”Henri Bergson (1859 – 1941) Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 47. consciousness needsobstacles to get over so toraise up creativitysometimes the more harshand demanding are theobstacles, the more sublimeare creativity’s outcomes Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 48. The most beautiful seahasnt been crossed yet.The most beautiful childhasnt grown up yet.Our most beautiful dayswe havent seen yet.And the most ) beautiful wordsI wanted to tell youI havent said yet Nazim Hikmet to his wife, from the prison of Bursa, Anatolya, 1940 Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo
  • 49. Thank You Massimo Schinco Conservatory of Music G. F. Ghedini, Cuneo